Inox or Lantec

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 22:05
ThreadID: 133815 Views:3967 Replies:5 FollowUps:3
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Hi
I have been perched at beach area for a few weeks and noted a bit of rust starting to form on my van wheel lugs

I was going to give the van a good spray of inox when I get home but some one mentioned lanotec was a good option as well

Lanotec does seem a good option but am concerned dust May get stuck to it

The next part of the question, would it be better to just use the lanotec (heavy duty) instead of the inox on the rest of the van.



Richard

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Reply By: Athol W1 - Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 22:27

Tuesday, Nov 22, 2016 at 22:27
Rich
I would use a liberal amount of Lanotec on all exposed metal surfaces, it is a good light duty rust preventer as well as a lubricant, but not for high speed lubricant applications. I would also recoat every few weeks whilst in a high salt or abrasive environment.

Regards
Athol
AnswerID: 606115

Follow Up By: Member - Rich - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:20

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:20
Athol
Doesn't the lanotec attract dust and sand in that it sticks to it?



Richard
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Follow Up By: Athol W1 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 08:01
Rich
One of the best ways to preserve iron from the effects of the moisture and corrosive effects of the atmospheric conditions is to apply a product that remains flexible, or in a semi liquid state. Valvoline Tectyl 506 is possibly one of the best products to protect iron or steel from corrosion or rust and it remains in a non solid state and also attract dust and sand, it is not suitable for applications not the likes of your wheel nuts but excellent on protected areas of the chassis (or internal body panels of your car).

Many years back I was involved with maintaining/servicing the vehicles used as Surf Lifesaving on the Gold Coast, we found that a liberal monthly spray of a mixture of Tectyl 506, Auto trans oil and a small amount of Turps on all exposed areas had a vast effect on the life of these vehicles that spent around 8 hours of every day of their life parked on the beach within about 30 metres of the eaters edge, and yes they did attract s fair share of dust and sand. Lanotec was not available at that time.

Regards
Athol
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Reply By: gbc - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:52

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 07:52
Penetrol. Lanox will heat up and run when you use the brakes. Inox won't achieve much in that situation.
AnswerID: 606120

Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:56

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 15:56
Rich

The simple way would be to get some car polish and polish the rust stain of the wheel nuts .
If you put lanotec all over them its hard to clean off and attracts dust and dirt and sand .

Inox is easier to get off but will attract dust and dirt as well.

They are not ideal for this application, maybe a small amount of inox or WD 40 where the wheel nut touches the rim , but only a quick squirt .

Cheers
AnswerID: 606141

Reply By: Member - Rich - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 16:57

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 16:57
Thanks all
AnswerID: 606143

Reply By: The Explorer - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:12

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:12
My suggestion would be to buy a spare set of wheel nuts (possibly cheaper that polishing/coating the current ones on a continual basis).

When you feel the need to display shiny wheel nuts, whip them out - bingo! job done.

Cheers
Greg
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AnswerID: 606151

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:30

Wednesday, Nov 23, 2016 at 23:30
I can imagine it now....oh, it must be a special occasion, Rich has whipped out his shiny nuts. :-)
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