air conditioning fan

Submitted: Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 16:00
ThreadID: 133860 Views:2300 Replies:7 FollowUps:5
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The fan for my heater and air-conditioning is currently on working on the top 2 speeds on my 1999 Troopcarrier .
The fan switch is ok , but my mate tells me there is anther part down near the fan motor , I was wondering if anyone knows of the location , he thinks its called a static something !! ..any help would be appreciated .


Cheers
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Reply By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 16:47

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 16:47
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Hi Mark,

I had the exactly the same problem in my 2002 Troopy which, I think, would be no different to yours.

The problem is with an electrical resistor which is switched in series with the fan to control the current and hence the fan speed. This resistor is housed within the duct close to the blower discharge and can be accessed by some dismantling. Possibly the glove box needs to be removed... a simple enough task.
I cannot remember exactly how to locate the resistor module .... the workshop manual was of no assistance, I simply used observation and logic. I think it was a small panel on the duct with 3 or 4 wires connected and removeable by means of a couple of screws.

The resistor is an open coil of nichrome wire in three sections mounted within the duct in order to be cooled by the air flow. In my case, some grass fibres had lodged on the coils of the resistor and caused it to overheat and fuse in the centre of one of the coiled sections. I was able to repair it by carefully twisting the broken ends together. Not an elegant repair but, short of removing the whole assembly and welding the ends together or replacing the assembly, it worked and has continued to do so 18 months later.

Pity that I did not take photos and record my actions for the benefit of others but if you have specific questions I may be able to help. There may be some info on the LCOOL site but I always despair when searching there. You may also gain some clues from this link but beware the boring and self-important Youtube deliveries from American contributors. But some of the photos may help. You could also Google "Landcruiser air con blower resistor fail" and explore some of the results there.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 16:59

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 16:59
Here is another link that may be useful. This is an Australian post but beware or some American descriptions where the resistor location in the vehicle LHD models are reversed blower positions.
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Allan

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Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:15

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:15
Thanks Allan I thought you may know the answer .
I will have a good look around where the fan motor is housed and see if I can find the problem , I will let you know of the outcome .


Cheers

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:29

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:29
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Of course Mark, it may not be a failed resistor. It could also be a dirty connection in the cable plug that connects to the resistor module. Before tearing it all apart, try wriggling the plug with the A/C on and lowest speed selected. If you get any response from the blower clean the plug. RP7 or similar.

Some of those links reference the resistor location as "to the left of the clutch pedal" but I have had a look there and cannot see it. I still seem to remember it as near the blower discharge on the left side of the vehicle. But then, I have a lousy memory! lol Anyone else know where it is?
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Allan

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Reply By: swampy - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:29

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:29
hi
Typically fan resistors are in the fan housing or very occasionally on the inlet side of the evaporater .[next in line for after fan housing ].
As the resistors get hot they need air flow .

AnswerID: 606276

Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:34

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:34
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Yair, right-on Swampy. In my case, the accumulation of grass fibres did a good job of shielding the resistor from the cooling effect of the airflow. Lucky the whole thing didn't catch fire!
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Allan

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Reply By: Life Member TourBoy, Bundaberg - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:41

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:41
From memory if you look under the glovebox and up you will see a couple of wires going into the ducting, that's the resistor. I don't remember having to take out the glovebox when I replaced mine...however the memory isn't what it used to be, anyway it's a 5 min job.
Cheers,
Dave
2010 Isuzu FTS800 Expedition camper
2015 Fortuner
Had 72 cruisers in my time

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AnswerID: 606277

Follow Up By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 18:47

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 18:47
Thanks Tourboy.

Found it up near the fire wall on the ducting.

If I knew how to download a photo I could show anyone interested where it is.

Thanks all for your help
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Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:43

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 17:43
Ok thanks Swampy.

Will be putting my head back under the dash after tea .
AnswerID: 606278

Reply By: RMD - Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 23:53

Monday, Nov 28, 2016 at 23:53
It is great to know where the resistor is situated BUT, since the vehicle is a few years old, the fan motor bearings WILL BE DRY. When you start the fan, Usually on LOW anyway, the dry motor which doesn't want to spin or start freely will draw FAR MORE current than when lubed. That is the primary reason nearly all resistors burn out.

So, unless you are prepared to remove the fan motor and lubricate it's bearings with a decent oil, ALL future resistor units fitted to the vehicle will have a short life.

Most folk are happy to replace resistors because that is what they are told is the problem. Wrong, it is simply a symptom of a hidden problem, the dry fan bearings.

Mobil ! engine oil doesn't evaporate as quick as most normal lube oils and is what I use in starter bearings and fan motors and most long life situations. 'Cos it works.

Physical contaminants on the resistor will of course end or shorten it's life if obstructing airflow through the resistor which MUST be cooled to survive at it's rated amp flow. Remember, dry fan bearings = high start current, resistor glows red hot and beyond. They never should operate red hot, they are not designed to.

Lube the motor! or buy a box of resistors to keep you going.
AnswerID: 606286

Follow Up By: Wayne B16 - Wednesday, Nov 30, 2016 at 14:17

Wednesday, Nov 30, 2016 at 14:17
Thanks RMD and everyone else I have the same problem so now I know where to start, I was going to pull the switch out .
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Reply By: craigandej - Tuesday, Nov 29, 2016 at 04:12

Tuesday, Nov 29, 2016 at 04:12
Its the resistor located up high in the passenger footwell. 2 screws will get it out. There are a few variants in design depending on your vehicles year. They give up after a few years from rusting out from moisture intake via the fan. They are around $50 available on ebay or toyota dealer. Never heard of a fan bearings being the problem as they are sealed.
AnswerID: 606288

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