ARB TPMS

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 14:28
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I see ARB now has a TPMS, choice of on-valve or internal sensors.
I have googled and searched Exploroz for independent feedback but without success.
Does anyone have them?
Comments welcome, specially on whether it is hard to reprogram them after you air down for sand or back up again for highway.
In general, researching for which TPMS I should get, there is a lot of older information out there, but it appears that types and models come and go quite regularly.
CJ
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Reply By: catmandoo - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:15

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:15
Hi CSeaJay,

I have not heard about the ARB TPMS, but I have used the Inawise TPMS for some years now. I have the 12 wheel system (5 car and 5 caravan). The sensors are internal.

When 4wding and airing down, it is just a simple matter of resetting the receiver by holding the reset button for a few seconds to re-calibrate the unit. It then applies the algorithms to the base settings at the time of the reset.

When you air up, you just repeat the procedure.

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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:18

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:18
X2 for the Inawise, great units and good customer support. Also if you get the type with the code buttons makes it real easy when rotating tyres.

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Reply By: Kazza055 - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:56

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 15:56
Really depend on what you want to monitor, it seems that the ARB unit will only do 4 tyre.

I have the INNOTECHRV 10 SENSOR TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING SYSTEM that I purchased back in 2014 at a cost of $453.00 AUD

This allows me to monitor all 8 road tyres plus the car and van spares.

The Australian seller is wipath.com.au - contact Craig.
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Reply By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:24

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:24
Just a question for those with sensors on the spare. I had a set similarly and the spare one rarely activated as they wake up with the rotation of the wheel. Used to take a few minutes in the morning to come up on the screen.

Stopped fitting them on the spare wheel and kept them in case of damage to the ones on the moving wheels
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:43

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:43
My inawise send once every 10 minutes from memory even if there's no rotation.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:32

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:32
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Tom, why would you want to monitor the tyre on the spare?
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Allan

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Follow Up By: TomH - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 22:46

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 22:46
Well if you buy a 10 unit set you have 4 on car 4 on van and what do you do with the other 2 If they are inside the rim ones I would put them on my spares so that if I got a puncture the new wheel would have one fitted. With the screw on the valve types you can just swap it onto the wheel you refit.
Make sense???

You could ask Kazzza the same question.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 23:39

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 23:39
Sorry Tom, I didn't phrase my question well.
I got the impression that you were wanting to observe the spare tyre pressure as you travelled and I couldn't see the point in that.

Both my spare tyres have internal sensors installed but they are not activated on the display until they are fitted to an axle for use.
With external sensors it does make sense to not leave them on the spare until needed.
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Allan

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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:40

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 16:40


$300

or you could buy a "Similar one" like the Blaupunkt for around $170

or other "similar" generic ones for around $105

But of course you don't get the ARB logo.

To change sensors you also need to buy a programming tool.

For less than ARB sell it you can get a lot better.

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Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 17:19

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 17:19
I can't comment on the ARB unit.

But I use the Doran 360, has performed flawlessly over 4 years, covering all kinds of terrain.

The senders are sealed units and the system is programmed easily.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy

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Follow Up By: CSeaJay - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:01

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:01
Landy

Please advise what is the procedure you have to follow when you stopped to air down from say highway pressures to sand (say 40psi down to 25)
What exactly do you have to do on the Doran unit?
Cheers, CJ
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Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:45

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:45
Haven't done it myself but if I was going from my usual 45PSI to 20PSI for a beach run, I would just turn the monitor off.

My reason for having the TPMS is so I can monitor the car and van tyres while travelling at highway speed where a deflating tyre could go unnoticed cause damage to the tyre. The TPMS is going to warn you of a change in pressure/temperature.

I don't see to many people driving at highway speeds along a dirt track or beach.

If you are doing extended touring with lowered pressure you can always reset the pressure reading in the receiver but this would be a bit time consuming for an hours beach run.
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 13:32

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 13:32
Hi CJ

Once I have aired up or down I can reset a baseline pressure on the Doran 360 unit which takes less than a minute, literally...

I do this as the Doran, like most systems, needs a baseline pressure to reference for the alarm functions to work. I guess you could just set a low baseline pressure and leave it at that, but that takes away the functionality of the unit. I set my baseline at the pressure I have the tyres inflated to and don't give my tyres a further thought unless I get an alarm.

What I like about the Doran 360…

A proven product and performer – I have covered 85,000klm of use over all terrain spanning 3-4 years flawlessly. And it has saved quite a few tyres. I’ve seen tyres destroyed very quickly due to no monitoring system. Apart from the cost, it could become a problem if you start to run out of tyres in a remote location.

Despite concerns raised by others on external transmitters, I have never lost a sensor due to it being located externally and I’ve given it plenty of opportunity to do so…

The sensors are a sealed unit – you can’t replace batteries. I like this as one of the main issues for external units is that once you break the seal to replace a battery you will never reseal it satisfactorily which in turn leads to an eventual failure due to corrosion.

The receiver, which is located in an overhead panel of the vehicle, uses a small antenna to receive a signal from the sensors. Despite the antenna’s location behind the panel, it picks up all transmitters, all the time, demonstrating the strength of the signal sent and the ability of the receiver to receive it. There is no need for a boost unit, but one is available if using on large trucks (for example).

It doesn’t have a temperature read-out, but alerts to overpressure, so if you input a baseline pressure to monitor, it will advise overpressure, which in effect is alerting to a temperature increase that should be investigated – either increase pressures, or reduce speed…!

Is the Doran 360 the only alternative – no, not by a long-shot, but whatever you choose look for quality and a proven product, there are plenty of products that will relieve you of hard earned cash for little value - and I speak from experience on that count...

Cheers, Baz
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Follow Up By: CSeaJay - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 15:12

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 15:12
Thanks
Unlike Kazza I find it important to set a new baseline. Two weeks of Simpson/hay river, at 20psi at times, I would like to know if a problem is developing straight away, specially in the van where you cannot see or feel a flat as readily as on the car.
Even more important when airing down for corrugations, where you would still do 60to 80 km/hr.
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Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 15:59

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 15:59
Maybe you need to re-read my post, specifically the last paragraph.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 19:05

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 19:05
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The beauty of my Inawise is that when you air-down, a press of the button lowers the alarm threshold instantly. Air-up and another press raises the threshold.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 17:20

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 17:20
Firstly, the only really reliable ones are internal as the are out of harms way and they give accurate temperatures which is very important. I have heard people complain of damage when getting new tyres. I have never met anyone who has had a tyre shop damage their sensors, and in 12 years I have never had an issue.
I have had Sensatyre monitors attached internally to the wheels for many years. I have them on the spare as well as the tyres are rotated. When you air down or up there is no reprogramming they always show the correct readings within seconds of any changes. They do not require movement to activate so turning on the ignition will give accurate readings within seconds. When airing up I do not have a trigger operated air hose it just has a clip on end. I clip it on the first tyre and experience tells about how long it takes to get to the required pressure. I then move it to the next tyre and while it is pumping up I check the Sensatyre monitor to see if I need more air and adjust if required when the second tyre is inflated, and so on with the other two (or more if you have a trailer of any kind) tyres. This method is much easier on the back as the tyre valve always seems to be at the bottom of the tyre and bending down with a trigger air hose is murder on the back. Its also quicker as you are mostly putting valve caps on and off while another tyre is being inflated.
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Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 18:16

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 18:16
Problem with the internal units is they need to be fitted by a tyre fitter.

Also if and when the battery goes flat you again need to visit the tyre fitter just to replace the battery.

Next time I get new tyres I am going to have shorter metal valve stems fitted.

Oh, by the way, the external sensor do detect the temperature through the metal part of the valve.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:44

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:44
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I use Inawise internal sensors with great results.
The batteries last for at least 7 years.
Mine were 6 years old and so I fitted new sensors (therefore new batteries) a couple of weeks ago when I fitted new tyres.
So it costs me a couple of hundred dollars each 6 years. I spend 12 hundred dollars on tyres each couple of years so it is "small change" but great security.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:47

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:47
I fitted my own , just needed to break the outside bead.

I have several sets oldest are nine years old and battery meter is still showing as full on the display. You'll need to replace your tyres before the batteries go flat.

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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 20:26

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 20:26
Hi Chris

You indicate no reprogramming required when airing up/down...

Can you expand on that for clarity? Do you need to reprogram the baseline low pressure you want monitored?

For example, lets say you are running 30psi all round and you have a low pressure warning set at 25psi, presumably you will need to reprogram the low pressure warning if you say set the tyre pressure to 20psi for sand work...otherwise you will be getting a low pressure warning??

When I refer to reprogramming with the Doran 360, I'm referring to the baseline pressure you want monitored if airing up/down...

Cheers, Baz
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Member, SunCoast) - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:21

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:21
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@HKB,
You fitted your own batteries to Inawise internal sensor/transmitters?
Well they are certainly not the same as the Inawise internals sensors that I have.
There is absolutely no way that you could fit new batteries to them.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:39

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:39
The sensors I have attached to the centre of the wheel and rim give much more accurate temp readings. They also alert you to binding brakes, leaving the handbrake on, and wheel bearing issues should you have them.
As for setting the low pressure warning. With Sensatyre monitors you can set the limit for all wheels in about 10 seconds, very easy. However I have it always set at 16psi and don't change it. At 16psi the tyre will not destroy itself if acted on straight away. So it does not matter what you are doing if the pressure drops to 16psi and you stop straight away you have not destroyed the tyre. If I am on the highway with pressures around 40psi and develop a leak I am likely to notice the drop in pressure, or rise in temp anyway. But if I don't and the as long as I stop when the alarm goes off the tyre will not be destroyed.
The Sensatyre units are sealed so when the battery starts to die which is a good for at least 7 years they need to be replaced with a new unit. You obviously time replacements with getting new tyres unless you are feeling energetic.
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Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:32

Friday, Jan 20, 2017 at 10:32
Alan,

I fitted the sensors to the wheels myself.

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Reply By: Member - Roachie - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:17

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 19:17
My Chevy Silverado comes from the factory with built in TPMS...internally mounted sensors. These work well but are not designed for low pressures (as you would use in sand etc)....just a USA law so people will know if/when they have a flatty.

However, I recently fitted a set of external monitors to my caravan, from Safety Dave.

Because I didn't want them to be over-exposed to the stones and tree roots etc, I drilled an extra hole in each rim, opposite the valve stem hole, but on a different angle. In this new hole, I fitted a short steel valve stem and permanently mount the sensor to that stem, leaving the original stem available for normal airing up/down.

It works well and the screen in the cab measures pressure and temperature, which have really wide-ranging parameters that the user can set and alter quite readily.
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Reply By: Burgo - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 20:23

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 20:23
I have had the ARB Internal TPMS installed for a couple of months now. Got them done when I replaced all 4 tyres, the fitter hadn't installed internal TPMS before and wanted me to do it once the tyres were off the rims, which I started doing, but once they saw how easy it was they did them all.

You do need an allen key to adjust the battery/sensor section to fit close to the wheel rim (this should prevent any damage if you get a flat or take the tyre off the rim).

They only support 4 wheels as mentioned above, but I suppose you could buy another set if you wanted more and have 2 displays running as the displays are small but easy to read - a feature I like a lot, but I don't know if the signal from the sensors is strong enough to work from a trailer and might depend on just where you place the display to receive the signals.

The display has audible warnings for leaks and if pressure is 8psi above or below the threshold you set - the threshold is for all wheels so if you run different pressures front and back you possibly need to use the mean average pressure.

Being plugged into the 12v the display is only powered when ignition is on, on startup it then displays the last readings and picks up the new readings once you're achieved 20kph.

Adjusting the threshold value is easy, press and hold the set button for 3 secs, then press to step thru the pressures 2 psi at a time until you get to what you want then press to save.

The remote fob ' sensor partner' is only $25 and enables you to set the location of each wheel on the display if you rotate wheels, or if you replace a wheel sensor. Replacement sensors are available. Batteries in the sensors supposedly last for some years, will have to wait and see how long that really is.

I've been very happy with the set...and was surprised there was so little information or reviews about them when I was looking to buy.

cheers
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Reply By: Member - Robert1660 - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:40

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:40
I have a SensaTyre internal system fitted to the Cruiser, the Tvan and the two spares. The internal setup in my opinion is preferred as it is less prone to mechanical damage when travelling off the bitumen.
The placement of the receiver has been a little problematic. The recommended place is underneath the vehicle, however I consider this to be not overly satisfactory. I currently have it installed on the cargo barrier, however it does have difficulty at times registering the pressure in the Tvan when I have a load in the back of the Cruiser. More work is needed to find a better position.
Rather ironically I have found that it is the temperature data of the tyre that is more useful than the pressure data. When the tyre is getting to 60 deg C then possibly you need to inflate it further or reduce your speed. Temperature is the biggest threat to tyres. Of course this relates to pressure, however pressure really does not tell you if the tyre is under threat as does temperature.
Based on this if your TPMS does not give accurate temperature measurements then it really is not producing the most useful data.
Hope this helps.
Robert
Landcruiser 200 Altitude Diesel + Tvan Murranji

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Follow Up By: Al-one - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:52

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 21:52
Hello Everyone,
I have had the ABR sensors fitted to my 4WD and caravan for some time now. They are the external ones and they have survived two trips to Cape York, a trip Tasmania and Western Australia without any damage. I would be happy to fit them again. Prior to these I had fitted a then popular canine brand which I returned for refund because, during the programming, the monitor thought the van was the 4WD and vice versa. This was unable to be reversed so I got a refund. No problems programing the ABR ones.
Cheers
Al-one
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Follow Up By: Idler Chris - Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 22:40

Thursday, Jan 19, 2017 at 22:40
Roberts' experience is exactly the same as mine. Heat is a big killer of tyres and like Robert when they get to 60 degrees I either stop for a cuppa and let them cool down a bit, drive slower, increase the pressure, or some combination of the three of them. I mostly have the display set on temp, not psi. If you get a slow leak the temp will rise long before they get to the low psi alarm setting. If you get a fast leak the tyre will quickly get to the low psi alarm (16 psi in my case) and as long as you stop straight away you will not damage the tyre any more than it already is.
As for the receiver, I certainly would not put it outside the vehicle. It has a very long cord so I would suggest moving further aft inside the vehicle.
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Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Saturday, Jan 21, 2017 at 10:36

Saturday, Jan 21, 2017 at 10:36
Sorry I have no experience with the ARB TPMS and don't know anyone who has them.

I have always used the external sensors. I run 2 sets of tyres on the Landcruiser and I use both a Tvan and a Caravan depending on the trip, so its dead simple to change from one to another. Or even lend them to someone.
I used a set of tyredogs for years - great on the car, not as good on the Tvan - couldn't reliably pick up.
Replaced them about 18 months ago with a set of 6 from ABRSidewinder (via Ebay or website) that cost $300. They are a great set - look identical to the Safety Dave ones above. The sensor is a bit bigger and heavier and on some rims they can cause scratching, but they work very well. The display is very easy to use. Simple button presses to program the sensors (they can be moved to different positions), to alter the alarm pressures, and to exclude the trailer tyres (for when the trailer is parked up. And if you have more wheels, just buy extra sensors (about $40 each).
They work 100% of the time on the Tvan. They were unreliable on the caravan which has zero offset wheels, so the sensors are shielded a bit by the alloy - so I extended the valve stems and they now work all the time too.
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