Long time, one clutch

Submitted: Saturday, Mar 11, 2017 at 22:00
ThreadID: 134453 Views:3600 Replies:8 FollowUps:22
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G'day everyone,

it was a big moment in the life of our mighty 80 series yesterday, we had a new clutch fitted.

The original clutch had given us good service for 592,050 kms but I have plans for this year which included giving the old dear a hiding - starting with Fraser Island followed by a muddy Gulf for a change, a casual trip across The Simpson and maybe some Canning Stock Route with everything in between.

Our mechanic, Nick at A1 Automotive at West Gosford, has been looking after the old girl for about the last ten years and he's often amazed by what I bring through his shed door - broken trailing arms, cracked control arm supports and various flogged out things - but he didn't believe it was the original clutch until he started pulling stuff apart.

The clutch wouldn't have lasted the year and I nearly drove through the front window of his office when I first took off.

We're looking forward to getting going on April 24.

Hoo roo
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Reply By: Paul E6 - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 00:10

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 00:10
It's funny on some new cars, can't even get a clutch to last 50k.
AnswerID: 609338

Follow Up By: eighty matey - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 08:26

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 08:26
Our mechanic reckons it's usually between 150,000 kms and 250,000 kms most clutches get replaced.
They reckon they were going to clear coat it and put it on the wall.
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FollowupID: 879199

Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 19:08

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 19:08
"It's funny on some new cars, can't even get a clutch to last 50k."

Mostly the short lasting clutches are the dual mass ones. They don't like very heavy duty, towing or engine mods.

The dual mass systems
PeterD
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Reply By: Member - Blue M - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 01:08

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 01:08
Eighty matey
You certainly had a good run out of it, much better than my previous 2006 Hilux.
First clutch at 70,000, second one in at 155,000.
Weakest part of a Hilux is the clutch.

Cheers
AnswerID: 609340

Follow Up By: Tim F3 - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 05:53

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 05:53
A great run for a clutch , i recently changed the original clutch in my 100 series turbo diesal at 355000 klm.
The labour cost was $440 which i thought was good.
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 07:05

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 07:05
Blue M,
I got rid of my '04 Hilux after 210k still with original clutch. That's with a lot of city driving but not much towing. The last of the old style Hilux before the body shape changed somewhat.

Regards
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Follow Up By: eighty matey - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 08:28

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 08:28
The boys were saying it was an advantage having no turbo on the motor.
It's a good feeling having a full clutch again.
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FollowupID: 879201

Follow Up By: Member - Warrie (NSW) - Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 14:43

Sunday, Mar 12, 2017 at 14:43
Hmmm, most of us would be in automatics- will they last 600,000 km? Mines at 270,000 km so has outlasted many clutches. I wonder what proportion of new 4WD's are manual these days......W
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 06:15

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 06:15
" most of us would be in automatics"

How do you figure that?
Neither of mine are and I would not want one.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 10:34

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 10:34
Malcolm M , have a look at sales stats , apart from Toyota 79 series utes [which do not yet come in auto] automatic 4x4 outsell manual by better the 10 to 1 across ALL brands , " would not want one" is silly statement with new age automatics that can and do the job better than any manual g/box …just look at F1 , not a 3rd pedal insight….
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Follow Up By: Member - Warrie (NSW) - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 16:58

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 16:58
Ten years ago a mate bought a manual Prado and the dealer told him then that 99/100 were autos. Guess what. He traded his in for an auto a few years later..W
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 07:20

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 07:20
Wonder how much of that is due to drivers not being taught how to use a manual box...
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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 08:56

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 08:56
"Wonder how much of that is due to drivers not being taught how to use a manual box."

I think it has a lot to do with the very high gearing of 1st gear. This makes for a lot of clutch slipping when manoeuvring vans and heavy trailer and hill starts. The torque converter in the auto provides up to 3:1 torque multiplication which in effect is a 3:1 extra gearing when staring.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 09:24

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 09:24
Nothing to do with 'not being taught how to use a manual box' , it has everything to do with the march forward of technology , 40 /50 years ago before it became the norm for women to work outside the home very few women drove but as more women found out ofhome work more women began to drive and manufactures followed the call for 'easier' vehicles to supply the demand …We once used to have to pay a 'premium' for an auto box ,now we have to pay a 'premium' if we want a manual g/box ….. won't be too far down the track for driverless cars to become the norm , that will be totally embraced by the 'fix my makeup and text on my way to work' brigade….
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Reply By: Member - Jack - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 09:02

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 09:02
Yep ... 480,000 in my trusty old 80 series (diesel) and I am on my second clutch, and I tow a Tvan now. No indications that it needs replacing as yet.
Jack
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Follow Up By: eighty matey - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 10:12

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 10:12
I tow a trailer for work but we don't tow travelling. The new clutch feels better.
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Reply By: Member - DOZER - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 11:13

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 11:13
For some reason or another, the std poverty pack 80 series clutch never dies....mate changed his at 450000kms and it was still 50% low gearing in first plus low down torque certainly helps.....he never seems to go through brake pads either...Go the 80
b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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Classifieds: Landcruiser 200 series /100 series 4 alloy rims with tyres and nuts GC

AnswerID: 609358

Follow Up By: eighty matey - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 11:44

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 11:44
I have always tried to be sympathetic to the clutch by using low range before I burn out the clutch but they are an awesome vehicle
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 14:59

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 14:59
-
The Troopy has done 320,000km so I asked my mechanic if it may be wise to replace the clutch before I got stuck somewhere remote.
He said it should not be necessary as he sees me as a moderate driver and furthermore the 1HZ troopy does not have enough power to stress the clutch.
I can empathise with the "power" view but he has not seen me drive off-road! lol

So OPK, I'll live dangerously.
Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 609359

Follow Up By: eighty matey - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 15:39

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 15:39
G'day Allan,

I've been asking our mechanic whether we should fit a new clutch for a while. He hasn't seen the need until this year. I think that's the good thing about using the services of a good mechanic on a regular basis. Much like having a doctor that is familiar with the quirks of my body has our mechanic is familiar with the old Toyota.

The mechanic was saying on Friday that if we had a turbo charged motor the clutch probably wouldn't have lasted as long as it did because of the lack of power.

Have a good day.
Steve.
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Follow Up By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 16:39

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 16:39
Allan

Remote travel and a clutch with 320,000 km don't quite go together . Has your mechanic got xray vision . ??

Cheers
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Follow Up By: eighty matey - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:12

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:12
Our clutch has been travelling remote up to 590,000 kms.
I think having a mechanic that is aware of the history of the vehicle and the driver's history helps, Mark.

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Follow Up By: Member - Howard (ACT) - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:26

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:26
Have to agree
I have had 3 cruisers that have been well and truly remote when the clutch was still original and .over the 320 OOO km mark. 1 x 60 series and 2 x 80 series
in fact all 3 vehicles still had original; clutch fitted when sold and they were working perfectly.
BTW neither of the 2 petrol 80s ever had anything opened up on the motors or gearboxes ..
Howard
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Follow Up By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:27

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 17:27
Eighty

You can't really tell the condition of a clutch unless you do a visual inspection . If anyone wants to play Russian ruetette with an old clutch it's up to them .
Than again Allan wouldn't head bush with my spaghetti wiring . It's called calculated risk I suppose .

Cheers
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Follow Up By: eighty matey - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 19:40

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 19:40
Yes Mark but I drive my 80 every day in all sorts of conditions. Nothing ever really goes overnight and I can usually tell when things aren't right. Driving on corrugated roads is usually where I get caught out with something going without me picking up failures.
With what we have planned for this year I couldn't consider giving the clutch another test so we changed it.
Change a few flogged out bushes, replace the 108,000 kms Toyo M/Ts for another set and we're off into the sunset for six months.

Steve
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FollowupID: 879252

Follow Up By: Member - mark D18 - Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 19:51

Monday, Mar 13, 2017 at 19:51
Sounds good to me , enjoy the sunsets

Cheers
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FollowupID: 879253

Reply By: sweetwill - Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 08:01

Tuesday, Mar 14, 2017 at 08:01
And here I was thinking that my 80 was special when the clutch was changed at 350000 odd, it was only changed becuse I didn't trust it anymore.
AnswerID: 609373

Reply By: Old 55 - Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017 at 19:32

Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017 at 19:32
I changed the clutch in my 80 at 287000 as we were doing a Simpson crossing. When we pulled it out the mechanic said it would have done another 280 thou. Better safe than sorry
AnswerID: 609402

Follow Up By: eighty matey - Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017 at 19:57

Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017 at 19:57
I've been asking my mechanic for a few years whether we should put another clutch in the 80. He was confident it would be alright and this year was time to change it. He owned an 80 until recently so was aware of the ability of the vehicle and what to look out for.
In the last few years the fourby has travelled to the Simpson, Corner Country, Western Qld, Gulf Country, Kimberley and more, so it hasn't just been a city vehicle and when we're at home it tows a loaded trailer every week, mostly in city and freeway driving.
Toyota did a good job.
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FollowupID: 879294

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Wednesday, Apr 19, 2017 at 20:11

Wednesday, Apr 19, 2017 at 20:11
I recently changed my original clutch in my 4.2 patrol 415,000 ks, not because it was stuffed, because I was worried it may die when I least need it too. Cant argue with that kind of mileage.. Regards, Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

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Get out and do something instead!

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