Long Range Fuel Tank - Ford Ranger

Submitted: Friday, May 05, 2017 at 15:43
ThreadID: 134799 Views:6694 Replies:13 FollowUps:13
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Good afternoon Ladies and Gentlemen,

We Have down graded from the Ti 550 Pathfinder, to a ford Ranger px mk11 xlt, with the Pathfinder we were getting 12.9 liters per 100 klms, so with long travels we usually carried only a couple of Jerry cans, but with this new vehicle we are doing 20.9 litre per hundred klms, so we are now looking at a long range fuel tank.

Now in doing this according to Ford, the sender unit will not read accurately and the trip meter distance to empty will not be accurate either, can any one shed some light on these issues for me please, and also maybe supply a couple of answers to solve our fuel problems.

I am a bit adverse to being stuck in the middle of no where with no fuel, to get me and the wife home.
thank you all,

Broody H2

New Photos of the new outfit coming soon stay tuned,
Broodie H3
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Reply By: new boy - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 16:41

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 16:41
Hi Broodie I have a 2014 Ranger and also went through the long range tank exercise and was told the same thing by Ford about the sensers. At aprox $1500 I couldn,t justify the expense unless you are doing very remote touring as there is nowhere on the main routes you need a greater range than 300ks . I tow a 3tn van we have just done 8800 accross the Nullabor and back doing 18.8 lp100 I carried 20ltrs spare which was poured into the tank on the last leg home to get home without having to top up at servos enroute. The long range tank might save you 2 stops on the Nullabor compared to me for a saving of $30 thats 50 crossings to break even plus its good to stretch out and get the bones moving . Just my thoughts
AnswerID: 610821

Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:02

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:02
hi Newby,
we tow a 2.6 tonne dirt road van and we would like to go to some of the remote places that we use to go to with a tent and a Cortina 440l mk2, back in the 70's, only this time we would like to be out of the dirt, the fuel is used when your camped up and you go off the next morning on your daily excursions, where there are no fuel stations within 300 klm, and you do 200 on a day trip in four wheel drive, OK we are not towing the van, but we will be when we move off to out next camp spot. with the range we are getting at the moment, a long range tank seems our only option. but as we have only had the vehicle for a few weeks yet everything is open for discussion
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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 16:54

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 16:54
Broodie, firstly, that's an upgrade mate :D :D

Has the Ranger got significantly larger wheels / tyres fitted ?
Or a lot of mods / weight ?
That seems like an excessive lt/100 from my experiences with others, unless you're towing ?

The long range tank would serve you well anyway, I have (in the PK) 126lt Long Ranger tank, and a Dolium 60lt in the tub, so around 185lt of fuel gets me on a lot of longer trips without the need to get fuel remote too often . . . I top off all the way to a last fuel destination, small top offs as it gets more expensive as you get more remote.

I think you have good options for the PX, tanks seen to be around 140lt with same or more ground clearance.

In the meantime, learn the fuel gauge idiosyncrasies for fuel used from total top off to full mark, 3/4 mar, 1/2 mark, 1/4 mark, yellow warning light, and empty line.
Just record all fills, top off when you get to each point and note how many lt.
You soon get to know exactly what's what, and how much you're really using per 100km, not by the car computer which is not entirely accurate.
AnswerID: 610822

Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:15

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:15
Hi Les,
the Ranger is stock standard at the moment except for the Hayman Reese hitch, and the fuel milage was worked on three very short trips, by pencil and paper and a calculator, with the amount of fuel actualy put into the tank and the milage on the odometer, at one fill it was up to 23.9 but that was going through some pretty hilly country, came home a different way and it came back to 19.9, but we had a tail wind and the van was missing 160 liters of water, it makes a difference.
Just a quick question does your long range tank read accurately on the fuel gauge?????.
thanks for you input it is greatly appreciated.
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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:31

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:31
Read you are towing, so would expect about that especially if hilly terrain in your initial short drives.
I assume you were towing on those drives ?

For sure the wind direction and strength is either a godsend or a curse, with or without something hitched up !!

My tank when topped off stays there until I've done pretty much 400km, when the needle is right on the gauge full mark.
I know then I have a safe 80lt up my sleeve.
From the full mark, the gauge goes down relatively evenly per 1/4 marks on the gauge, usually about 20lt per mark, so on blacktop drives without a lot of terrain, no wind to speak of, and siting on 100 / 110, I get around the 800km range on top of the first 400km.

I'd be looking at ways to better tune the engine for best economy.
Maybe a chip / exhaust will help with the towing, allow you to not push it as hard, have some up your sleeve power wise, you just have to drive them easy as with better power / torque people sometimes 'use' it instead of nursing along, and use same or more in fuel / 100.

It's hard to say if you could / should be getting much better than high teens with your caravan, there are so many variables with weights, if an auto and may be better towing out of overdrive, etc.

I know if I do around the limit I get low to high 10s, if I drop to 90 I get about 0.5 to 1lt better econ, it's usually not worth worrying about.

It might take you a trip or three more to get the feel for things, best way to use the Ranger gearing, right pedal, etc.
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Reply By: Kazza055 - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 17:08

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 17:08
I had a 137L LRT fitted to my D-Max by the dealer as I was sick of the poor range I had with my previous Challenger.
Yes the fuel gauge is not accurate and the distance to empty is out of wack. I need to use about 1/3rd of a tank before the gauge starts to move and then is shows as per normal. Also at this time the distance to empty starts working correctly - prior to this it is stuck on the maximum distance.
I soon figured out what my useful range was while towing, I have gone as far as 650k but use the figure of 500k as a safe range between refills.
As new boy has already stated, it cost a lot of money to fit a LRT but that was the choice I made and I do not regret making it, well worth the $1,500 for piece of mind.
AnswerID: 610824

Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 17:12

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 17:12
I have a 2014 BT50 which is basically a PX Mk 1 with a Mazda skin.

I do go to remote areas with my heavy hybrid camper/caravan. I need the range, I don't like jerries in with my stuff in the canopy and with crook shoulders can't manage them to and from the roof rack. Don't like the weight up there anyway. So I fitted a 145 litre Brown Davis replacement tank. They bend the float arm so that when the tank is empty the gauge reflects that.

On my model BT50 and the PX Mk1 the Distance to Empty (DTE) will be wrong as it's set for an 80 litre tank and the parameters are hard coded in the computer systems.

However, if you look that the Newranger forums, there is a guru there who has got into the coding for all sorts of stuff in the PX Mk 11 and I think one of them is tank size and DTE correction. Sorry, I can't find it now to provide a link, but I did read it before I went away in January so it should be there somewhere.Newranger forum

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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:19

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:19
thanks Frank,
Ill check out the web site forum sounds interesting and get back to you later.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 23:46

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 23:46
Found it!
Look at SAEB Build up PX2, page 3 onwards. The guy is a genius, it's mindblowing
You will need some analysis gear or a friend/tame mechanic who has it.
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Reply By: RMD - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:58

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 18:58
Broodie
Is the PX just as a ute or has a conopy fitted. The Nissan effectively had a canopy and the ute if just a ute will have the overflowing air hitting directly onto front of the slope of the van, almost at right angles. That will cause it to use MORE fuel.

Perhaps fit a deflecting wing or similar so it feeds the air up over the van.

I used to tow a smaller van, with a turbo landcruiser, a lot less weight of van, I know, but it returned 12 lt/hundred on a long trip. The wing on the rear roof of the wagon did work.
AnswerID: 610827

Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:43

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:43
Hi RMD, the Nissan was the ti550 station wagon with a v6 diesel engine, and every bit of computer type wizardry that man had invented in it, half of the stuff it had, I never worked out how to use, to complicated for me. At the moment the ford is still stock standard and has only done 4437 klm.
We have looked at putting a air deflector on the ute, but I have to decide what canopy I am going to fit, and that is an option that we may have to visit if the fuel economy doesn't improve in the future.
thank you very much for your input and different train of thought.
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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 19:40

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 19:40
Wow! That is some fuel difference, mine is nothing like that but your trial is over a very short period and distance + is it run in yet. I work mine out over thousands of K's.
Someone on the new ranger forum has worked out how to get the sums correct. with a long range tank but guess you will have too research it.

I have a 132l longranger tank in mine and know pretty well how much fuel I have used and how far it is to empty just by observation. At that weight van and the vehicle fully loaded I average under 17 litres per hundred.
AnswerID: 610830

Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:50

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:50
Hi Eagle, would you mind telling me which Ranger you have because I have been talking to a mate of min and his fuel economy is around 16 and he has a van similar to ours but his ranger is a pk, He also fitted the long range tank but talking to him this morning he does have issues with the gauges.
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 19:17

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 19:17
I will get back to you soon as I have no 240v power at the moment. Ranger is a px . I will try and find the distance to empty thread fix for a long-range tank on new ranger forum.

Always remember, many take their fuel as an overall trip with the van on, they don't count the K's when they have nothing on the back during that trip.

Tomorrow I maybe able to help find that thread on distance to empty with a long-range tank.


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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Sunday, May 07, 2017 at 14:06

Sunday, May 07, 2017 at 14:06
The information is on the newranger forum by saeb and stewart using dte in the search.

A forscan tool was used to adjust code parameters, from memory one of the people are on the development team for forscan.

Happy reading as there is a lot of it or you could become a member and send a message to saeb for more information.
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Reply By: Member - Murray R (VIC) - Friday, May 05, 2017 at 20:40

Friday, May 05, 2017 at 20:40
Hi Broodie
The PX Ranger has an engine save feature in that when the fuel gauge reaches empty but the engine will stop. Have heard of people who have fiited long range tanks in Rangers and had this problem with still plenty of fuel left, maybe 40 to50 litres due to incorrect fuel sender readings. Tank manufactures may have solved this by different tank shape. It would pay to check with Ford if your Ranger has this feature and with the tank maker them self to see if the fuel sender will read correctly from full to empty. Bending the sender float arm won't fix this problem. As others have said the New Ranger forum might get you some answers as well.

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Follow Up By: Outback Epicurean - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 10:55

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 10:55
Hi
Interested in this last comment. Have a PX with LRT but would like to know if this will actually cut out well before fuel is actually used. Can anyone give a definitive view rather than just heresay.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:46

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:46
On my Brown Davis 145 litre installation in my BT50 I can use all the useable fuel in the tank. Ie all but the last few litres.

I too have heard various stories - that it will cut out when the OEM DTE says 0km to go, or that it allows you to go 20 or 30 km past 0 then cuts out, etc.

I tested mine. I was carrying spare fuel just in case it ran out. I went 30 km past the 0 and not wanting it to run dry as that can cause damage I filled up. The tank took 135 litres from memory, so I think I could keep going and use most of the remaining 10 litres.

I have calibrated my Scangauge so it exactly matches calculated fuel consumption measured over thousands of km and many refills. I now use that as my primary fuel gauge.
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Follow Up By: Member - Broodie H3 - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:57

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:57
Hi frank, please excuse my lack of knowledge but what is a scan gauge and how does it work ????
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 13:41

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 13:41
Broodie,

It's a device that plugs into the diagnostics port under the bin near the driver's right knee (BT50 and Ranger). It can display any four of about 30 items and if you have codes available you can program it to display custom items.

On the issue of fuel, you can set up the tank size and then after a couple if fills and some adjustment according to the instructions, it is then calibrated and can pretty accurately show you litres remaining in the tank, distance to empty, etc

Most useful to me are Litres remaining, DTE, coolant temperature and transmission temperature, but any four of what is available can be displayed.

According to their website the Aussie distributor, Ample Outdoors, has closed down, so eBay is probably your best bet.

Scanguage link

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Reply By: MobiCondo - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 06:48

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 06:48
Thanks for this thread, very timely for me. Been a bit keen on the product, but the fuel economy has me some what taken-a-back. We currently have a Nov 96 build 80 series 4.2 L Diesel DX LandCruiser towing a heavy (3500Kg) off road van with the 20L/100 economy figures. We were hoping to get better by up grading the tug.
AnswerID: 610840

Reply By: gbc - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:32

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 11:32
The way you drive them makes a good difference. If I leave the cruise control on in the hills it will get through plenty. I drive the auto manually and let it slow down a bit uphill and that makes a big difference. All diesels have a happy spot, you'll find it at about 95-97 kph on the flat in sport mode or thereabouts. It's never going to keep up with a 550nm v6 though.
AnswerID: 610844

Reply By: Paul E6 - Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 22:24

Saturday, May 06, 2017 at 22:24
20.9 seems really high even for towing, and especially for a diesel.
AnswerID: 610864

Reply By: Member - Blue M - Monday, May 08, 2017 at 00:51

Monday, May 08, 2017 at 00:51
I have a simple way to work out my fuel usage. I always drive with the trip meter "A" showing.
When towing my van, I zero my trip meter when I fill up, if I get 100 kilometres per 1/4 tank all good.
99% of the time 400 clicks = 78 to 81 litres at the bowser.
When not towing, I zero my trip meter when I fill up, and if I get 150 kilometres per 1/4 tank all good.
98% of the time 600 clicks = 78 to 81 litres at the bowser.
I never partly fill a tank, and always Zero the trip meter, then there is no confusion.

Once I get to understand my vehicle, I could safely operate without a fuel gauge at all.

Cheers






AnswerID: 610901

Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Monday, May 08, 2017 at 07:53

Monday, May 08, 2017 at 07:53
Hi Broodie

Before you rush out and spend a lot of money, do this simple little task...

Plan where you intend to travel.

Plan where you can purchase fuel.

Add 10% to a worst case scenario .

One or two quality spare jerry cans are far cheaper that the cost to buy the long range tank.

I am speaking from past experience and the biggest issue that I had was not having and accurate fuel gauge. If you are not going to be travelling into very remote outback locations, where some fuel stops can be up to 800 kilomtres, then you will not need that extra 50 odd litres, and this then Leeds to the question, is 50 litres worth $1500?

Like I have said, I have been there and done and that, but never again and found it easier and cheaper to carry an extra Jerry if unsure.



Cheers


Stephen



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Reply By: Member - WBS - Monday, May 08, 2017 at 08:52

Monday, May 08, 2017 at 08:52
Everybody has to make compromises in life don't they. Getting the Ranger might just be a compromise you'll be able to live with. :)

I don't know what you are towing, where you are driving or your driving techniques are but that sort of fuel consumption seems a bit more than I'd expect to get.

I installed a 140litre Long Ranger Poly replacement tank in my BT50 (A very close relation to the Ranger) and can say that the fuel gauge behaves quite satisfactorily with the new tank. I keep detailed fuel consumption records and have been observing the gauges behaviour since I installed the new tank.

If anything you will always have more fuel left than the gauge shows but you should be able to rely on it. When the gauge shows half full the tank is near to half full and the same with quarter full. At 1/4 full you do have around 35 litres in the tank, so I continue to rely on my gauge. If the gauge shows empty I wouldn't be planning on pushing the limits.
WBS
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