Breakfast Time creek

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 08:20
ThreadID: 135168 Views:2139 Replies:5 FollowUps:13
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Ok a slow day...
As far as I can determine from google and Wikipedia, there are 2 Breakfast Time creeks in the world. Both are on the Oodnadatta track. One near William creek, and the other near the Flinders Rangers. They don't appear to be connected.

Does anyone know the origin of the naming of these creeks? ( apart from the obvious that they were both found at breakfast time).

Lastly I recall seeing photos of the Flinders Ranges one going from dry to flooding on a forum recently. Does anyone know where those photos are located?
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:24

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:24
Yep a slow day.

Can't help you with the origin of your Breakfast Time creek names. I can say that there definitley weren't any such names in WA.

There are however numerous Dinner Camps, Creeks, Hills and Bores in WA. Maybe our early WA Explorers and Pioneers didn't have time to eat breakfast.


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Reply By: Bob R4 - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:43

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:43
https://www.facebook.com/leo.beinke/videos/10211993260606614/?pnref=story

see if that gets it for you Tony

Cheers, Bob
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:04

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:04
That's the one.

Amazing.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:08

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:08
What is this current fad about changing a normal video screen into a vertical letterbox slot where you can't see the full picture and often miss out on some of what the photographer is trying to show.

You see it on TV all the time where someone's mobile phone footage has been used, but the two outer thirds are blurred out.

Makes no sense to me

EDIT: I've seen this clip "unclipped" and it's much, much better.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:31

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:31
I agree Frank why do people take videos vertically?? But unless I'm mistaking, like most phone videos, it's not clipped. The person who took the video held the phone in portrait like the would for a call, not landscape mode.

If there is a landscape version I'd be interested to see that, but I think you'll find that is as good as it gets.


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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 11:37

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 11:37
.
Tony, vertical videos are usually taken by blondes. They believe that all their photos will pour out of the phone if they tip it over!
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:00

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:00
Here's one where the outer edges are not blacked out but blurred, indicating that there is more there ....

So in the words of Prof J S Miller, "Why is it so?".
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:07

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:07
Err ahhh thats a video trick to make the video more appealing. It's exactly the same image but blurred and magnified in the background to fool people.

Don't tell me you have been falling for that trick all these years Frank.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:08

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:08
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Hi Frank,

That technique is to give an impression of a wider field of view than if the the original was just left as a narrow vertical format.

If you look closely you can see that a duplicate of the original image is split in two, blurred, then attached to either side of the original to create an impression of a wider format.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:10

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:10
"Don't tell me you have been falling for that trick all these years Frank."

Probably, Tony. :-( :-(
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:10

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:10
I need to type faster tony!
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:26

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:26
I've fooled by worse Frank. LOL
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 19:51

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 19:51
The odd thing is that you almost never see anybody holding a camera in portrait mode!

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Follow Up By: Member - Blue M - Thursday, Jun 29, 2017 at 01:03

Thursday, Jun 29, 2017 at 01:03
My little fat fingers always find a way to cover the lens.
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Reply By: Nomadic Navara - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:59

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 09:59
This page only shows one. Probably it is a long creek that you crossed twice. Alternately the other one was wrongly labelled, the site in the link is the Australian Gazetteer.
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:25

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 10:25
Peter, it finds the other one, near William Creek if you add a dash to the search.
'breakfast-time creek' Typical Government. It doesn't have a dash anywhere, -
except on that search page.

They are definitely different. They're about 300km apart at their closest points and flow in opposite directions.The Flinders Rangers one starts in the Flinders and drains into Lake Torrens.

The William Creek one starts just north of William Creek township, and drains into Lake William.
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Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:33

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 12:33
Some good reading on nomenclature history of place names in S.A. in the link below.

Nomenclature history in S.A.

Bullock-team drivers and Camel-team drivers were the originators of most of the early Anglo-Saxon names for many lesser-known locations in Australia, because they were, very often, the first, and the most regular travellers, to or through the location.

They were also the ones most familiar with the relatively-unexplored terrain, and the ones most questioned about the "tiger country" terrain and features.

Pioneering surveyors were the next source of naming for features, as they surveyed new country for development.
Quite often, the surveyors sought out locals to gather names for features - and it was often bullockys and pioneering locals who provided the local name to surveyors!
In lesser numbers of cases, Aboriginals provided the name, and it was anglicised.
Breakfast Time Creek gets a mention in the link above, as well as bullock-team drivers.

Below is a very old lantern-slide photo of one of the Breakfast Time creeks, possibly taken by Flynn of the Inland.
I find it interesting that he appears to be using the creek bed as a track.
I would have thought that most creek beds would have been too soft for the skinny buggy tyres.
Maybe he was only camped there overnight, but I would have expected Flynn to be too bush-savvy to camp in creeks in the Outback.

Breakfast Time Creek

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: Member - Blue M - Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 16:38

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017 at 16:38
I got into a heated discussion at work one day about where a river started and finished. so I looked for something to prove me right and I found this site called Bonzle

I am not sure if the information is 100% correct, but I cannot find anything to prove it wrong.

Cheers
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