Diesel Storage

Submitted: Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 15:44
ThreadID: 136123 Views:1607 Replies:4 FollowUps:7
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I think this might have been talked about once before. I get a lot of different answers storing diesel fuel in an air tight drum. How long would it be ok till it starts going off?
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Reply By: RMD - Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 16:28

Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 16:28
The diesel doesn't go off but algae grows if any water is, either in the fuel as absorbed water within the fuel molecules, or there is water in the sealed container.

The algae grows where the fuel and diesel molecules meet each other.

Best way to store diesel for a length of time is to add an algeacide to the fuel to retard/stop any such algea growing in the first place.

Air tight means there is no inward or outward air flow whichwould carry slight amounts of moisture into the container if unsealed/beathing.
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Follow Up By: Dean K3 - Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 18:57

Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 18:57
Concur but wonder if it should read

he algae grows where the water and diesel molecules meet each other. ?

I asked same q on truck transport page on FB, general conclusion was to use ICT F10

I used about 100ml as a shock treatment on folks cruiser with 40l plus a fill up from bowser certainly reduced the exhaust emissions
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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 12:51

Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 12:51
Dean
I didn't know algea was male or female. Which is best?
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Follow Up By: Dean K3 - Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 16:48

Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 16:48
Copy n paste issue let out the T !
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Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Jan 21, 2018 at 14:37

Sunday, Jan 21, 2018 at 14:37
Sorry Dean, I was overcome by the fumes!
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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 19:57

Friday, Jan 19, 2018 at 19:57
Make sure the drum is it full. Make sure the drum is black and only fill it when humidity is low. It will last years and years and years.
AnswerID: 616223

Follow Up By: mountainman - Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 04:23

Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 04:23
BP strongly recommends no more than 12mnths
On their website
For diesel

Definitely shorter again for unleaded fuels
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 11:17

Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 11:17
Yep Big fella, that is what they say but in reality it can be a little different.

Have started a truck White that had been sitting for nearly 5 years. It ran ok and was just a bit doughy for a while until the tank was filled with new fuel. Same with a genset that was used as a standby, it would mostly get refuelled around the 2 year mark.

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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 11:04

Saturday, Jan 20, 2018 at 11:04
Having worked in the Petroleum Industry for 35 years, most oil companies will tell you the same thing. That Deisel Fuel, providing it is stored in air tight contains in stable conditions will last for up to 12 months without any degradation of the fuel.

Now this is fairly subjective. What does stable conditions mean. Certainly stable temperature is fairly important, as high temperatures tends to make the “light ends” in the fuel “evaporate” out, and they do not always go back into suspension, so a stable temperature will help prolong the life of the fuel.

Keeping the storage container out of the weather will also help ensure that water does not enter the container. Water is one of the most damaging impurities for any fuel, but particularly in diesel and kerosene/Jet fuel. Not only will the water damage your engine, but as has already been mentioned, algae will develope, not only at the fuel/water interface, but also on the container surfaces that are in contact with the water. Obviously, algae will not do your engine any good either.

If stored correctly, then 12 months should be ok, but I would certainly filter the fuel prior to adding it to my vehicle fuel tank. If at all possible, I would also decant the fuel into another container, watching for any contaminants as I go. This may take a little extra time, but it certainly beats paying for a new engine.

Macca,
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jan 21, 2018 at 18:11

Sunday, Jan 21, 2018 at 18:11
I keep a few jerrycans of diesel in my shed, John, in case of any emergencies, blackouts etc. Out of the weather, and relatively cool, except in summer. LOL

If you do the same it should be okay. After all, the diesel is already a million or so years old!

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: john m85 - Tuesday, Jan 23, 2018 at 17:55

Tuesday, Jan 23, 2018 at 17:55
thanks Bob I have a few jerrys my self been sitting for around 8 months.John.
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