Changing trailer studs

Submitted: Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 09:12
ThreadID: 136511 Views:878 Replies:11 FollowUps:12
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Hi all
Currently my van has steel wheels etc to suit my old tow vehicle - a Rodeo. I have recently bought a 2013 Prado and would like to set the van up with matching (compatible) wheels. What's the best way to go about this? The stud pattern is the same - the offset is only 5mm different so that should be right.
Can I get the van studs changed to metric ones so that I can put use a Prado wheel nut on them?
Can I get an imperial nut that will allow the Prado wheel to go on the van?
If I get steel wheels for the van and don't change anything else can I get some extra nuts that would allow the wheels to be interchanged in an emergency (i.e. alloy on the van or steel on the Prado)?
Any advice appreciated.
cheers
Suitcase
Prado SX and a little van

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Reply By: Hoyks - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 09:54

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 09:54
Changing the studs out is relatively straight forward, but a bit dirty.

Take the wheel off, and if there is room behind the hub hold a large lump of metal next to the back of the stud to adsorb some of the impact and knock the stud out with a hammer. Put the new stud in from the back, wiggle it a bit to get the splines into the marks left from the old one, put a stack of washers on the threaded and then use a wheel nut to pull the stud through the hub.

On a drum/disc its basically the same, you just have to get the drum/disk off first.

If you can get nuts to fit the trailer studs, stick them in a bag and stash them somewhere safe, then that will be the cheapest and easiest solution.
Standardising the studs front to rear would be the better option, but if you want to run steel wheels with the alloy option, then you will still need the bag of nuts.
Standardising the wheels front to rear will leave you with 1 nut type for the lot, but $$.
AnswerID: 618096

Follow Up By: duck - Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 10:42

Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 10:42
hoyks
May have forgot 1 thing when tightening the studs put the wheel nut on backwards (if an Open Nut) then tighten this will stop the tapered nut digging in to the washers & stop it damaging the washers & nut if it’s a closed nut put the wheel on without the washers before pulling the stud all the way thru & check the stud has been pulled all way home by taking the wheel off again & when you do the first run stop & check the nuts a few times as its often after a stud replacement that they may come loose due to heat etc as the stud finds its new seated position
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Reply By: tonysmc - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:24

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:24
For the price of a dozen studs and work involved, you'll probably find it cheaper and easier to just buy a whole new hub and bearing. I've found that a hub with bearings isn't much more than just buying the bearings alone. And while your fiddling around with them at least you know the bearings are good.

Tony
AnswerID: 618098

Reply By: RMD - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:27

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:27
Suitcase
I have a Dmax which is same as the Colorado which were made after the RA7 Rodeo. All the same and are METRIC. Toyota uses metric too.
Your van., made by an Aussie and has probably fitted Imperial studs to the hub.
The thread dia and pitch of thread, the coarseness or fineness, may be different to the Prado metric.
Matching the wheel stud threads is MUCH harder to do than carrying a few spare wheel nuts, just in case. Not worth changing the studs. As long as they hold the wheels on is all that matters, you never see them while driving and passers by can't tell.
As long as the thread is long enough I would not bother to try and change them.
If in good condition they will be seated tight in the hub anyway, replacements are not as tight if similar knurling/splines to OE are used.
Will replacement Prado or similar, fit securely into your hub. Lots of people just buy some, they look close, and force them in, ie press fit.

With alloy wheel, the nuts must suit of course, but as long as you have 1 dia of stud as the thread engagement you are legal. The Isuzu,RA7 is deceptive because with the nuts which suit the alloys wheel seem to not have enough thread through the nut, but if measured there is more than 1 thread dia engagement. Can't get any stronger or more holding power/clamping force.

A bit of confusion in your ask as the studs and the wheels really have nothing to do with each other.
Do you know exactly what thread the van studs are using?
AnswerID: 618099

Follow Up By: Member - Suitcase (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:43

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:43
You are probably right, RMD about the RA7 studs - just my ignorance. They are certainly different and the nuts/studs currently on the van are different to the nuts/studs on the Prado.
I have the opportunity to get a complete set of Prado alloys to match the car and just want to know the best way to go about it.
It looks like I could either replace the studs on the van but risk them not seating as well as original or replace the drum on the van with ones that have Prado compatible studs in them.
Does that seem reasonable?
Suitcase
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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 15:33

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 15:33
The studs of the hub either imperial or metric have little or no bearing on the nuts holding the wheel claped to the face of the hub.
As long as the studs and nuts and hub face are in good condition it matter little.
Replacing the studs in the hubs to Prado or some metric size will not alter or improve what you already have. They are already proven to do the job. The only requirement is suitable nuts to hold the alloy wheel.

Back to RA7 and Isuzu/Dmax/Coloado.
They came out with both steel and alloy wheels. The nuts for either wheel will fit either wheel.
The steel variety of Prado ie it's nuts, may have the same tapered section as the aloy Prado ones and will hold either wheel.
I don't think they are ones with washers on them. Only if they are washer type AND you really need to have same wheels for some reason, then you may have to consider changing studs.

Are you blowing tyre after tyre to need same same on vehicle and trailer?

I just don't understand the logic of why they must be the same. You seem to be on a costly path to achieve nothing much at all.
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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:44

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 11:44
If you get onto this mob they will answer all your questions and supply you with nuts or studs if you require them.

Speedy wheels
AnswerID: 618100

Reply By: Malcom M - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 13:18

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 13:18
if you are getting those alloys then you have to change the nuts anyway.
In that case I'd change the studs as well, otherwise why bother?

Hubs can be expensive so I'd just do the studs (which are cheap) assuming you are mechanical and have the tools.
AnswerID: 618104

Reply By: Member - Suitcase (QLD) - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 17:26

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 17:26
OK - all this is good info.
I know that the current van stud and the Prado are different because I cant put the nut from one on the other - the van stud is slightly larger in diameter. The Prado alloys nuts are the washer type ones.
So - next question - possibly can be answered by the wheel shop people. If I go ahead and get these Prado alloy wheels, will I be able to find a set of nuts to put them onto the van studs - whatever type of thread it has?

cheers
Suitcase
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Follow Up By: mike39 - Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 20:12

Saturday, Apr 07, 2018 at 20:12
Alloy wheels and their holding nuts are strange bedfellows.
There are plenty of instances where the alloy wheel and hub have parted company because the nuts were the incorrect type to secure the wheel.
mike
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Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 00:21

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 00:21
I have been in the tyre/wheel industry for years. But retired out of it now.
I think by what you have said, that the van has probably got 1/2 inch UNF studs ( common on trailers and vans) . the Prado I am sure would be Metric M12x1.5 or 1.25. You may be able to source some studs for the van with the metric thread to suit . I am pretty sure you won’t be able to get the Prado type nut to suit your alloys in the 1/2 inch thread.
But may not be easy to find metric studs for the van either, great if you can so all wheels and nuts would be interchangeable. Try tyre places or as someone said speedy wheels, Mullins wheels etc. but you will probably have to be lucky enough to find someone interested in doing the work to find what you want. (Been there done that)

Cheers and good luck
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:10

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:10
You can source Prado studs from any Toyota Dealer, if they haven’t got them, they will get them in.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:30

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:30
All very good being able to get Prado studs BUT there is no surety they will spline into the same holes the larger van studs leave behind.
Different beast.
I would get someone with a lathe to make some nuts with washers to suit the Prado wheels. Someone with a lathe made Prado nuts didn't they?

That would make it all legal, possible and as good as Prado ones.

If there is enough difference betwen the threads it may be possible to rethread Prado nuts with the larger van thread,ie tap them to new thread. Only got 0.35 of a mm difference though.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:40

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 10:40
Thanks for your follow up RMD, however my comment was aimed at shane r1 who didn't think Prado studs/nuts would be easy to find. Having re-read shane's comment, I now realise he was saying something different.

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Follow Up By: DesF - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 13:45

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 13:45
I have a Aust made 6x4 trailer which I have fitted some S/H mags , but I only have a steel spare so I have a set of steel wheel nuts fixed to the spare wheel ( zip tied) should I need them, ( also it has a wheel brace fixed as well) ,
Easy as ,
Cheers Des.
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 18:02

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 18:02

Just a photo to illustrate the differences in studs and nuts. On the left is a Prado stud (and nut) and on the right is a 1/2"UNF stud (and nut) from a caravan with 6 stud rims. Clearly the Prado stud spline is smaller and finer, so no chance of swapping those studs. It is possible that other aftermarket 12x1.25mm studs are available but I am not aware.

Alternative strategy:
#1 swap the drums over - should be able to get them with 6 stud metric (My Tvan has them) - just beware of the stud length as they are usually a little longer than Toyota studs and the Prado nuts are closed.
#2 Use a spacer for any emergency situation where you need to fit a Prado wheel to the van. A spacer can use open 1/2" UNF nuts to attach it to the drum and will have 12x1.25 metric studs that will take the Prado wheel. Not the use of spacers is not legal, but it might get you out of a pickle
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Reply By: Member - Suitcase (QLD) - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 19:59

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 19:59
Thanks for all the info people. I've got some homework to do.
cheers
Suitcase
Prado SX and a little van

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AnswerID: 618158

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 21:58

Sunday, Apr 08, 2018 at 21:58
Suitcase - the sites listed below are full of trailer component information ..

Martins Trailer Parts - catalogue

Spinny Things

Toyota Landcruiser and Prado wheel, tyre, and general engineering specifications ..

Wheel-size.com - Toyota

I'm inclined to go with the suggestion that the easiest and cheapest changeover is to buy complete new hubs with the Prado wheel studs.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 618161

Follow Up By: HKB Electronics - Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 10:30

Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 10:30
Also agree, would be easiest to just purchase an ALKO drum with Toyota studs if it will fit the current axle stub, if the van has done a few Km's I personally would just buy complete new backing plates and drums and you won't have to worry about any brake work for some time.
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Reply By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 11:42

Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 11:42
Just an off topic note. I had a mate who used to get drunk and we would regularly have to carry him home and put him to bed. We called him suitcase as we reckon he should have had a handle implanted on his back so he was easier to carry.
AnswerID: 618168

Reply By: Member - Suitcase (QLD) - Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 19:04

Monday, Apr 09, 2018 at 19:04
Has anyone these nuts?
Suitcase
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 12:36

Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 12:36
Looks like excellent copies of nuts that are used on my GXL L/C ute , albeit with different thread.

Bob
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Reply By: Member - cruza25 - Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 14:04

Thursday, Apr 12, 2018 at 14:04
1/2 unf wheel nuts to suit Prado mags
232536160525 See this item on eBay
$30 a set of 5

https://m.ebay.com.au/itm/1-2-UNF-Chrome-Forged-Wheel-Nuts-to-suit-Toyota-Alloy-Wheels-/232536160525
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