one spare or two ?

Submitted: Monday, Apr 23, 2018 at 23:36
ThreadID: 136605 Views:2111 Replies:17 FollowUps:18
Most of what I read suggests I take two spares when travelling to Cape York or GRR yet our 4WD instructor says one spare with a good LT A/T tyre (toyo opat 2)
would be sufficient and saving 40kg odd of weight. He went on to say that running with the right tyre pressure he'd never had a puncture in 20 odd years.

Weight and where to put the damn thing tend to lean me to his way of thinking. 265/75R16 should be pretty common where were going and one spare would get me to somewhere that has tyre services ?

Maybe take an inner tube, if I can get the thing inside the tyre. and it would work with tubeless tyres ?

Any thoughts, experiences ?

Cheers
Tony
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Reply By: Member - Bigfish - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 04:40

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 04:40
I,ve done many tens of thousands kilometers of off road driving in over loaded tojos and nissans. Always carried 2 tyres. Never needed both. (very remote area driving so it was a duty of care issue with my employer) . The Cape road is just another corrugated dirt road that is often in surprisingly good condition...certainly not a challenging drive. 1 spare will be heaps. So long as you have good quality, high ply AT tyres all will be well.
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Reply By: Banjo (WA) - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 07:07

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 07:07
Also in an overloaded vehicle to Cape York. Did the second tyre one day and was glad I had another tyre to fit onto one of the rims.

I carried just the one complete spare wheel, one tyre and one tube.

That gave me the security of an additional spare without the weight penalty of a second spare rim. The tools required are minimal and I did it despite being right handed, but having two left hands.

Paul
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Follow Up By: Member - TonySA - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 11:02

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 11:02
Hey Banjo, might be the way to go. Should save 20kg, Not sure how i'd get the busted one off or the new one on. Only tyres I changes were on my push bike and they could be a pita to lever over the rim. But I'll see what my old mate Google has to say on the matter :)
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 17:00

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 17:00
Tony, If you are happy with just taking a tyre without the rim, for a second spare, it's still better insurance than not taking it at all. You may have to wait a while but someone will come along with tyre changing gear who will be happy to help you. At least you have the tyre and the stress is off. Make sure you take a decent metal handled tyre plug kit for small repairable punctures. That in itself will save you having to use your normal spare if a plug or two will fix the puncture! I see you have a twin cab, you can pack a lot of gear inside a tyre so to save room if you have to carry it in the back of the ute.
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Follow Up By: Member - TonySA - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 21:32

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 21:32
You sir, are a bloody wizard. Just dump the tyre in the tube and start filling it. I love that idea ?? was wondering where to put it. Was thinking roof as without the rim it’s very manageable but now it’s n the tub.
One full spare, one spare tyre, maybe a tube as well, puncture kit and set of TPM’s sounds like the way I shall proceed.
Thanks ??
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:26

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:26
We purchased 'tyre pliers' but have never used them.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:36

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:36
.
Before "packing gear inside the tyre" think about it. With endless corrugations any hard object packed inside the tyre may wear through the sealing on the inside surface of the tyre. My early experience with beer cans packed in the 'spares box' taught me that lesson!
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Reply By: pmk03 - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 08:28

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 08:28
G'Day

Like many I too have carried a second spare all around this country for many years. Also a beadreaker & puncture repair kit & never had to use them.
Correct tyre pressures for conditions & good new or near new LT tyres for each trip & maybe we've just been lucky. That's all the SA Tracks, Simpson, Cape York,Kimberley, Tanami, Plenty, Buntine, Great Central Rd. Etc.
These days I just carry the one spare but always make sure I have good tyres prior to a trip.
Having said that I'm heading off tomorrow on a new adventure, Now I'm thinking............One or Two spares !
Cheers,
Have a great Trip
Paul
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Reply By: Ozi M - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 09:05

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 09:05
I carry two on the gravel highways, I pulled over on the GRR for lunch and to water the bushes and about 30k down the road I felt something was wrong.

I had spiked the shoulder of the tyre and it was unfixable, I put spare number one on and with 500k still to go was glad I had my spare spare.

I carry two, plus a puncture repair in a can and a repair kit, cheap insurance compared with the alternative
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Reply By: CSeaJay - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 09:19

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 09:19
Tony

I had a similar choice to make recently for a 15,000 km trip across Aus and anticlockwise over the top. Have also done CY.
I chose a good quality TPM and it gave me peace of mind. It alerts you on both temperature increase and pressure decrease. Will save you a tire, and was a key reason why we chose not to take a second spare
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Follow Up By: Member - TonySA - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:50

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:50
now there's something I hadn't considered, thanks CJ
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 17:50

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 17:50
I am with a Cseajay on this.
The most common way of wrecking a tyre is running it flat without knowing. A TPMS kit will alert you to any issues before it becomes a big problem in most cases.
I have done several Simpson trips and two Caoe York ones amongst many other outback trips and I only carry the one spare. Any punctures I have got I have been alerted to by the TPMS and have managed to plug the hole and top up the air without even getting my jack out
Cape York is not remote and help is not far away. Weight is your biggest enemy when touring so the second spare may attribute to other issues if you are already heavily laden
Having said that, you need to feel confident and comfortable with your setup so run with your gut feeling
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Follow Up By: Member - Robert1660 - Friday, Apr 27, 2018 at 12:52

Friday, Apr 27, 2018 at 12:52
Another vote for a TPMS. I have an internal SensaTyre setup and it not only monitors pressure but, as I have recognised, more importantly temperature. On a recent trip to Alice Springs we damaged a sidewall, ironically on a relatively good road. The TPMS immediately gave a warning and after stopping I found that the tyre was only about 30% deflated. Unfortunately even though the tyre was not otherwise damaged it could not be repaired. This was my first puncture in about 70000 km of outback travel. Fortunately Alice Springs was large enough to carry an exact replacement for the tidy sum of $500. My thought is that in future I will carry an extra tyre only, no rim, for situations like this.
Robert
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Reply By: Member - TonySA - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:55

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:55
Thanks all for your input.
Its like insurance, you never need it until you need it.
Cheers
Tony
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Reply By: Member - mark D18 - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 13:36

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 13:36
Tony
I leaving next week on another Simpson crossing and have decided to take one spare tyre and rim and just a spare tyre
Many ks on dirt roads with no tyre problems
Cheers
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Reply By: Tony F8 - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 18:26

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 18:26
I've done 46 trips up the Cape and the Gulf, only ever carried one complete spare and a tube, call me lucky, but I've still got the tube in its original packaging, a lot comes down to tyre preassures and the right line, well thats my bit of input.
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Reply By: Member - Mark C (QLD) - Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 18:41

Tuesday, Apr 24, 2018 at 18:41
Hello Tony. I also have a good TPMS and have only carried one spare for the last 6 years. Gibb River, gulf, Birdsville and Strezlecki all towing camper. Lower tyre pressures according to surface and monitor pressures with TPMS. Good guality 10-12 ply AT tyres and no problems with one spare.
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Reply By: RobynR4 - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 07:27

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 07:27
Tony, we did all sorts of outback tracks with 'correct pressure', 'the luck of the Gods' seeing us puncture free for 20 yrs...then on the way home from our Kimberly trek 3 yrs ago we got 3.
Shredded.
Beaut little sharp stones on the gravel roads (Plenty Hwy, Gibb, Savannah).
Puncture kit stayed unopened. No use with shreds.
We had to run on the steel rim for 30km and when it collapsed, we put the flat tyre back on and did the last 30km fwop-fwop-fwop...!
Hubby had always talked about the benefits of steel rims and finally had the chance to demonstrate!

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Reply By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 08:19

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 08:19
You can go a long time and not need that second spare, maybe never. I carry a second spare without a rim and I've been down to no spares left in the middle of nowhere only once in many trips. I was really glad I had that second spare then. You can always trust Murphy's Law to apply.....if you've been carrying two spares and never needed the second so decide to leave it at home......you are asking for it. If you never carry a second spare, don't upset the apple cart. That's my scientific opinion. :-)
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:27

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:27
LOL if you take 2 spares you only need one or none. If you take 1 spare you need 2. Murphy will see to that.

I would only take 1 spare for Cape York, Simpson etc. But 2 for the GRR if you are taking in Mitchel falls or Kulbaru. The most important things are good condition tyres with lots of tread, and pressures.

As you suggest, a spare tube is a light weight compact option but try putting it in before you go and get talc powder etc and some patches as well as one of those tyre repair kits. make sure you check the right stem profile when you get the tube too.

IMHO if you take a spare tyre, put it on a cheap light alloy, it won't really weigh much more. Even get a passenger construction tyre in the same diameter, but in a thinner width for your second spare.
Tony
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:52

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:52
"put it on a cheap light alloy"
Why did you not inform me of this idea 20 years ago. Have second spare on roof rack.
Dave.
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:58

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 09:58
As I always worked in remote, or isolated areas, 2 spares has always been the norm. On a few occasions, I've even carried 3 spares when all tyres were getting past 50% wear. Boobook's jest above is so true, while Murphy is travelling with you!

Places like the Simpson can handle 1 spare, while long, stony tracks warrant more security, like a second spare and or patching equipment. Repairing or changing a tyre on the side of the road takes time, even for the experienced person, so factor this in if you're in a hurry to get somewhere. If you're inclined to be impatient, then 2 spares are the go.

And if your tyre repair kit weighs as much as an alloy rim, then question if 2 spares wouldn't be the easier option.

"When I had 3 spares?" Not a slow leak, puncture, flat or blow out in a few thousand clicks of fast bitumen travelling.

Bob

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Follow Up By: Member - Cuppa - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:08

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:08
"When I had 3 spares?" Not a slow leak, puncture, flat or blow out in a few thousand clicks of fast bitumen travelling.

Bob

Good insurance I hope Bob!
We have 2 spares on the rear of our ex Telstra canopy, & a third on the drawbar of our Tvan. Vehicle & Tvan wheels are interchangeable. In regard to our forthcoming trek across the Gibson desert I considered reducing weight by leaving one spare behind, but this raised issues of it's own. We don't carry tyre changing gear (just a puncture plug kit) & the weight of doing so would be a significant part of that saved by leaving one spare at home. Leaving the spare off the drawbar would require a different protective cover to be made - not cheap! Leaving one off the rear of the vehicle would render other storage I have between the two unusable.

So we are taking 3. Most likely over the top, especially as in dire circumstances we could abandon the Tvan & use it's two wheels too!
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:14

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:14
"............abandon the T-van?" Never, Cuppa!!!

Just camp there till the tilt tray arrives. Thanks follow up,

Bob

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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:24

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:24
Yes I agree with Bob. never abandon the Tvan.

The way to do it is abandon the 4x4 and tow the Tvan home by hand. Slow progress but you get to stay in the Tvan for the rest of the trip.

LOL
Tony
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:39

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 14:39
Ha ha, too funny!

Bob

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Reply By: Theo D - Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 20:07

Wednesday, Apr 25, 2018 at 20:07
My Cruiser wagon had a Rock Armour dual wheel carrier fitted to it when I brought it. I've since unbolted one side for easy access to the smaller barn door, but on longer trips it will go back on and will carry 2 spares.

Better to be looking at it then looking for it in my mind. I've been in the position when I've done a tyre and thrown my spare on and crossed fingers and toes for the following hours hoping the inevitable doesn't happen.

Could carry an additional spare again under the car but it gives away a little bit of ground clearance. I've sorted that, and instead of having a 265/75 under there I've opted for a 235/85 which is of similar ride height yet tucks up nicely under the wagon. It'll get me out of trouble if it ever gets used.
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Reply By: Malcom M - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 11:03

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 11:03
Seems to be a lot of 'it can't happen to me' here.
I have a mate who carries two spares on a 200. He's a seasoned 4WDriver and has lapped Oz a couple of times off road.
On one trip he shredded a tire in the gibbers out Corner Country way, swapped it out and some 500 meters later a second one was cut beyond repair. On went spare #2.
A few Kms later and another tire bit the dust and he was screwed.
He sat there for quite a few hours with the wife and a couple of under 5's before someone came along with the same stud pattern and lent him a wheel and followed him to the nearest town, fortunately without stuffing it..

3 dead carcasses within a few Kms. It can happen to anyone.
I carry two wheels plus a couple of tubes and repair kit. Hopefully they'll never be used but the day I need them I'll be awfully glad I was dragging them around all that time.
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Follow Up By: Greg J1 - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:38

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:38
Hi Malcom. That first sentence is very true.
We have probably done at least 100 000 kms travelling around this wonderful country. We always have 2 spares for the vehicle and two for the trailer, (we now have a nice off road caravan that also has 2 spares). All interchangeable between ute and whichever trailer.

Never had a flat tyre in all that time. Tracks like the canning, gun barrel, grr, the Simpson 3 times, the Queensland gulf country countless times, you get the picture.

Last week heading into town for a doctors appointment, 5 kays out of town and get a flat tyre so stop and change it. On the edge of town another one. Stop and change it. Late for appointment. Get to the tyre shop to get them fixed and they laughed. They have had about 15 tyres to fix that morning from tek screws.

You don’t have to be remote to need 2 spares.

How many 50mm x 12g tek screws are there in a box ???
Cheers Greg
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:54

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:54
"How many 50mm x 12g tek screws are there in a box ??? "

Ask your tyre shop :)


Only kidding

Regards
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Follow Up By: Greg J1 - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:56

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 15:56
Haha gramps. I did ask them !!!

Cheers mate
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 18:52

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 18:52
Malcom I am not disagreeing with you but a flat tyre is just one of many things that can go wrong with your vehicle, many come unstuck with suspension component failure from being overloaded as well and carrying additional weight ( potentially extra spare tyre) can also attribute to this.

GregJ1 response is testament to this with the amount of off-road k’s he says he has done and not had a puncture yet is carrying 4 spares around the country
The incident he did have could of easily been addressed on the side of the road with a repair kit without even using his first spare.

Not looking for an argument, just putting a different slant on it as luck plays a part in this as well. Your mate in the 200 had a bad run but how many tyres did the previous 100 or 1000 vehicles wreck on that same stretch of road?

Just sayin!
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Follow Up By: Greg J1 - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 19:41

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 19:41
Alby. Totally agree what you said. Overloading does place stress on tyres and suspension and causes trouble out bush. But I do believe in Murphy’s law as well.
Sure I could have poked a cable into both those flat tyres.
IF I had one with me.
Not looking for an argument either but I guess I just ran out of luck. Just wondering how many how many 100 or 1000’s of vehicles went down the road I drove on and only 17 flat tyres. ( There is only 1 tyre shop in town ). Poking a cable into a puncture is only a temporary fix so I guess one day I would have had to get them fixed properly any way.
Cheers Greg
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:47

Thursday, Apr 26, 2018 at 22:47
When mustering is in action, having a buggy out of action for just 20 minutes could be a disaster, so we carried 4 or 5 spares in each buggy and were able to change wheels in a couple of minutes......
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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Reply By: Member - TonySA - Saturday, Apr 28, 2018 at 18:51

Saturday, Apr 28, 2018 at 18:51
Well guys and gals, sure appreciate your input.
Very enlightening.
Having scored a cheap factory alloy I decided to go with 2 spares.
Keeping the steel spare but fitting all 6 with new rubber, keeping the existing stockies to put back on when we return andthe newies go bald.
Also, having taken note of your comments and what I have read on European and US standards for new vehicles, I have invested in a set of Top Dog TPMs. Hopefully it will enable me to plug small hole before the tyre gets shredded.
I'll let you know how we go.
Cheers
Tony
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