Water Crossings

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 12:50
ThreadID: 13721 Views:1577 Replies:2 FollowUps:8
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If towing a CT and doing a few water crossings how often do you have to service CT wheel Bearings.
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Reply By: rolande- Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 13:26

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 13:26
....."Boat trailers are without a doubt the most overlooked piece of equipment in a boating anglers arsenal and it’s usually not till a wheel bearing gives way, a spring breaks, a winch cable parts, the chassis shows signs of cancerous rust or we’re issued a defective notice when ‘submersible’ lights fail that we consider repair and preventative maintenance duties.

Simple things like not submersing the wheel bearings in water – fresh or salt – will go a long way to prolonging the life of a wheel bearing.

Of course this is not always possible, particularly with larger craft, and an ideal scenario would then have the boatie leave the rig stand for a while allowing the bearings too cool before submersion.

Hot bearings submersed in the wet stuff will cool rapidly with the contracting process of grease, air and to a lesser degree metal, quickly inviting water into the system.

As the bearing does the hard yards along the highway, most greases including designated wheel bearing greases lose their viscosity, basically meaning they actually become thinner.

Rubber seals on the axle side of the bearing halts much of this thinner grease from escaping and stops the intrusion of dust and grime.

Keep an eye on these seals for signs of deterioration.

A set of ‘Bearing Buddies’ allows a continuous reservoir of high temperature grease to lubricate the bearings while a grease nipple ensures a simple application of the grease.

Standard leaf springs are prone to rust when they invariably enter the water well before the bearing even comes close.

Galvanised springs will last a lot longer while standard springs can be treated with fish oils or lanolin grease..........
AnswerID: 62981

Follow Up By: rolande- Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 13:30

Follow Up By: rob1 - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 15:05

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 15:05
Check wheel bearings and grease after any trip involving water crossings (at the next most convenient time) and re-pack with new grease. Do the regular maintenance and your trailer will last a loy longer.
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FollowupID: 324298

Follow Up By: rob1 - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 15:06

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 15:06
loy longer??? that should be..lot longer

cheers
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FollowupID: 324299

Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 16:29

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 16:29
Eric,

You can buy bearing buddies with a little window, and a grub screw. These are used with oil, and would have to be better than grease. Most roadtrains use a similar setup for their trailers these days, well in Qld and NT at least.

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AnswerID: 62988

Follow Up By: 10 Para (Qld) - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 19:18

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 19:18
What are buddie boys and what do they do how do you fit them etc
Regards
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FollowupID: 324327

Follow Up By: Leroy - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 20:41

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 20:41
theyre called 'bearing buddies' and you take the cap off the centre of the hub (that covers the split pin and nut that holds the hub on) and get a piece of wood and a hammer and tap the bearing buddies into the hub where the cap was. You then pumpem full of wheel bearing grease and you can see the spring compress that makes sure the grease is always pushing into the hub/bearings. They cost $20 bucks (i remember when they were $60 years ago) and are the best investment for a trailer. I put them on every boat trailer Ive had.

LeRoY
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FollowupID: 324338

Follow Up By: V8troopie - Monday, Jun 14, 2004 at 01:10

Monday, Jun 14, 2004 at 01:10
Leroy wrote:
"You then pumpem full of wheel bearing grease and you can see the spring compress that makes sure the grease is always pushing into the hub/bearings."

That might be a little misleading. You don't pump the whole hub cavity full of grease, just the area behind the bearing buddy diaphrame until the spring compresses a little.
The idea behind this contraption is this: should the warm hub be rapidly cooled, as when immersed into water, there would be a lower pressure formed inside which could suck water past the seal.
What the spring and diaphrame does is to compensate for this pressure drop so no pressure difference happens and, consequently, no water gets sucked in.
This assumes the rear seal is in good condition and the buddy diaphrame can move readily ( they can get stuck with grit but there is a special plastic cap available to prevent that)

All one does before dunking the hub is to check if the spring is still compressed so it can do its job, if not pump in a little more grease.

Klaus
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FollowupID: 324380

Follow Up By: 10 Para (Qld) - Monday, Jun 14, 2004 at 20:34

Monday, Jun 14, 2004 at 20:34
So are theses bearin buddies avalable everywhere , like can you drive into the local garage or 4X4 shop and get them fitted. seem like a great idea.
Regards
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FollowupID: 324469

Follow Up By: Leroy - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 08:37

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 08:37
Go to any boat shop. They will show you how to fit them also.

Leroy
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