NRMA bloke was telling me about frozen diesel in New England

Submitted: Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 19:34
ThreadID: 13728 Views:1946 Replies:3 FollowUps:3
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My battery died during the cold near Armidale the other day. NRMA bloke said they hear of numerous cases of frozen tanks of diesel. Don't underestimate the New England climate. Minus 15 not uncommon.
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Reply By: Baz (NSW) - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 19:40

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 19:40
No way i would, have riden my road bike through there in winter, definately brass monkey weather up there.

Baz.
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Reply By: Member - Nick (TAS) - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:21

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:21
A couple of years ago heading to work I came across the same thing,all the diesel in the fuel lines had turned to a thick gel.Apparently our supplier had given us "summer grade diesel", not 'winter grade stuff' .Its some sort of additave added to the diesel.The thermometer at work hit -15 that morning,even the air lines running up the side of the vertical shaft kiln froze.
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Follow Up By: Keith Scott - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:26

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:26
where abouts in tas was that??? want to get down that way.
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Follow Up By: Member - Nick (TAS) - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:38

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:38
That was at Mole Creek at a Lime Plant,later that morning it clouded over and rained for about 15min then cleared again,freezing all the roads coming in to the plant.One of the tankers got half way up a hill coming in but couldnt get up,tried to stop but took off backwards down the hill,luckily sliding off the road onto the shoulder and stopped.The driver got out and as soon as his feet touched the road he went belly up.
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Follow Up By: Steve L - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:52

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 21:52
"Its some sort of additave added to the diesel"

It's apparently simply the wax in diesel - it's in all diesel, just in reduced amounts in the 'winter grade'. Wax has a higher temperature at which it starts to solidify, so the 'summer grade' becomes thicker as the temperature drops.
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Reply By: Bilbo - Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 22:57

Sunday, Jun 13, 2004 at 22:57
Refineries have to "refine it harder" and blend it more to get the wax crystals out of it. Hence, it costs more to produce "winter diesel" - get more wax out, costs more money. Look at it this way, summer diesel is "Standard", winter diesel is "Super".

From memory there are about 6 grades of diesel fuel sold at different times across the Australian climate ranges.

When I was "mechanicking" in the UK, it was not uncommon to just light a fire under the truck fuel tanks to get it going! Never lost one yet! Had a few close calls though!! He,he!

Bilbo
AnswerID: 63036

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