It Has Happened Yet Again!

Submitted: Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 16:56
ThreadID: 137294 Views:2073 Replies:5 FollowUps:16
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ABC report... "Campfire coals covered by sand on Queensland beach burn feet of 6yo boy."

Someone ignorantly or carelessly covered a campfire with sand with an horrific outcome.

......"people wrongly believed fires could be put out with dirt or sand.
While the flames may be out, fires extinguished with sand can retain heat up to 100 degrees Celsius for eight hours after the flames are no longer visible.".....


It is not uncommon for persons to cover a discarded fire. If you did not know.... or did not care.... be aware now.
NEVER, EVER bury a campfire. Even if you think it is no longer alight, there is likely to be live embers under the ash. Either extinguish with water carefully or spread the embers on the surface and maintain close supervision until fully extinguished.

Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - johnat - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 19:38

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 19:38
Allan,
Agree with what you have said, except that, if the fire is well and truly doused with water, turned over a couple of times and doused each time, then covering with sand is a reasonable solution.
The other point I would make is that fires should ONLY be lit in established fire places. That way, there should be no possibility of any one wandering over the covered ashes.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

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Follow Up By: Member - Ross N (NSW) - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 19:57

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 19:57
Not often practical
RossNielsen
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:29

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:29
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Johnat, I thought that is what I prescribed.... "extinguish with water" ?

And there are not a lot of established fire places where we camp in the deserts.
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 22:03

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 22:03
I have seen some nasty steam burns from extinguishing with water, & steam burns are worse than boiling water burns.
I think it’s better to not bother with a morning fire & just use the gas stove for brekkie.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 09:23

Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 09:23
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I did use the word "carefully".

We too just use the gas stove most of the time and wood only occaisionally for a camp oven.
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Allan

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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:11

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:11
In the desert I have always buried the fire before we go to bed at night. Always out and cold when we wake up in the morning. Dont know about other people but I only carry 60-90L of water and dont waste it on a fire unless there is an emergency.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:41

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 21:41
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Ivan, can you be sure that your buried fire is fully extinguished?
Cold on top in the morning sure, but maybe not so down below.

Any fire we use for cooking is small and fully consumed before retiring so do not need to use precious water on it. The exception is a camp-oven pit containing coals so these are lifted out onto the surface to cool before we retire.


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Allan

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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 22:15

Thursday, Sep 27, 2018 at 22:15
Only a idiot would bury a fire thats still burning. What a waste of wood. Our fires are coals only when we bury them and yes a I do dig the centre section before we leave the next day to make sure.
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 06:19

Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 06:19
The Maoris call it a Hangi.
Buried cooking pit.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 09:33

Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 09:33
Short of water ? There is 'always' a bladder full of last nights beer / wine / port that can be used to make sure the coals are totally dead before burying especially in the desert .. or the beach .
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Tuesday, Oct 09, 2018 at 16:44

Tuesday, Oct 09, 2018 at 16:44
Depends how big your bladder is :-)
Macca.

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Reply By: Greg J1 - Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 19:35

Friday, Sep 28, 2018 at 19:35
Hi Allan. Three times in our last trip up to the gulf we have pulled into camps in the mid afternoon and have parked beside live campfires obviously from the last people’s effort from the night before.

All we had to do was stack some leaves and twigs on the pile of ashes and wave a hat over it and there’s our campfire.

Such a shame a little kid was hurt. That’s sad.

Cheers Greg

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Reply By: Candace S. - Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 15:13

Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 15:13
Amazingly, I survive even though I never bother to light a fire when camping!

Cooking for one is easily done over a small gas stove. I suspect that method can easily scale up to cook for a group.

Fires make a mess on the ground, pollute the air, and are potentially dangerous (namely, it could get out of control). Oh, and I don't need to carry or gather fire wood. Or be concerned with putting it out.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 15:30

Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 15:30
I just eat cold baked beans and travel alone.
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 17:18

Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 17:18
Is that due to the effect of the beans in the tent of a night? :-)

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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 22:19

Saturday, Sep 29, 2018 at 22:19
A Tent !. Pure Luxury for the well to do.
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Greg J1 - Sunday, Sep 30, 2018 at 18:28

Sunday, Sep 30, 2018 at 18:28
Just can’t bring myself to cooking fresh Barra fillets on gas. Sacrilege.

A manangoora station mudcrab on gas. No way.

A plain old fashioned mixed grill cooked on Gidgee coals. That’s living.

Maybe you are missing the real Australia Candace.

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Follow Up By: Les - PK Ranger - Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 08:40

Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 08:40
Before finding 4WDn, my outdoors experiences were limited to bushwalking, both short and extended walks.
We NEVER had campfires in 20 years or so doing this, until doing the Aust Alps Walking Track, the cattlemans huts :)
That was just an awesome experience, and although we'd still be in bed early after walking a good day, it was nice having that small comfort fire to socialise around for a few hours.

4WDn, it's a no brainer to have safe, small fires to sit around at night, boil a billy, and / or cook on.
But common sense and proper fire management is a must, and obviously gets overlooked by many . . . in an almost vast % of those cases it is simply good luck no more accidents or fire incidents are caused.
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 07:52

Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 07:52
Surely common sense applies.

This occured at a beach. That implies kids running around barefooted and there is litterally billions of tons of available water. Any half wit would surely understand to put out the fire properly with water.

On the other hand, a desert or bush camp is a different scenario. Firstly there may not be much water, secondly the risk of a fire is low, and and the likleyhood of kids running around barefooted is almost zero.

There is no need to stop having fires or eat cold baked beans in the middle of a desert, just bacuse a kid got burned on the remnence of some fool's fire on a beach in Qld.

Having a fire and cooking over coals is half the enjoyment of camping. I can see th epolitically correct brigde banning all fires becuase of these kind of events.

shees.
Tony
200 with 2012 Tvan Canning.
Happiness >= your perception of the events in your life minus your expectation of how life should be.

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 08:13

Monday, Oct 01, 2018 at 08:13
Well, we are in the age of overreaction!
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Tuesday, Oct 09, 2018 at 16:52

Tuesday, Oct 09, 2018 at 16:52
Well said Boobook. There are a lot of irresponsible people out on the road these days. Whilst not meaning to “tar all with the same brush”, a lot of international backpackers have very little idea of what is safe, or acceptable when travelling our vast outback.
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