tubeless tyre valve stem

Submitted: Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 11:09
ThreadID: 137422 Views:1049 Replies:5 FollowUps:12
found online a coby valve system were you can replace stem without taking the tyre off the rim though some off you mite be in to this as a back uphttps://www.colbyvalve.com/

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Reply By: Rob A2 - Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 12:52

Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 12:52
OK interesting but are they legal and compliant in Australia?

https://www.tyreandrim.org.au/Default.aspx?PageID=5715558&A=SearchResult&SearchID=3653027&ObjectID=5715558&ObjectType=1

Rob
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Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 14:43

Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 14:43
Rob.

Can you point us to the bit the supports or refutes your question or do we all have to buy the manual you reference?

Cheers

Anthony
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Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
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Follow Up By: Rob A2 - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:30

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:30
Anthony I have an older version of the manual and as there has been a lot of changes since the introduction of run flats I was hoping someone, a vendor probably, would have a more up to date copy.

I will send the links to my tyre engineer and see what he thinks

Rob
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Follow Up By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:48

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:48
You have a tyre engineer?
Tony
200 with 2012 Tvan Canning.
Happiness >= your perception of the events in your life minus your expectation of how life should be.

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Follow Up By: Rob A2 - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:54

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:54
Tony yes two actually. Comes from working in and around the fleet industry for a very long time and doing a great deal of tyre durability testing. Learnt a great deal about round black sticky things over the last 40 years or so

Rob
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 11:36

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 11:36
Tyre engineers are always available to those people using large numbers of heavy duty tyres.

When I owned 19 x 50 tonne Komatsu dump trucks in the early 1990's, and chewed through a large number of big tyres, the tyre companies would always make a tyre engineer available to me, to "run the numbers" on a job, or investigate the reasons behind tyre failures.

Cheers, Ron.
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Reply By: RMD - Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 13:41

Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 13:41
enz
As you said, a back up.
If the valve stem has ripped away from the inner seal shoulder, then you still have to remove the tyre soon, one side of bead, to get the broken bit out.
AnswerID: 621926

Reply By: Member - Boobook - Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 15:48

Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 15:48
They are great. I got a pair on Amazon, though they had to be shipped to the UK, and someone brought them over for me.

I did have a valve stem that was perished and slowly leaking once which prompted me to buy them. They are available in Brisbane but at twice the price.
Tony
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Reply By: Shaker - Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 19:30

Saturday, Nov 03, 2018 at 19:30
You can change standard rubber valve stems without removing the tyre
WITH ONE OF THESE!
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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 06:23

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 06:23
They work really well, I've carried the tool and spare stems for years, used it several times, only once each for my vehicle and trailer but as many again for others.
Peter
1996 Oka Motorhome

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:59

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 12:59
.
I must lead a 'Charmed Life'.

Never, in all my travels, have I needed to change a valve stem.
Maybe I change the vehicle frequently enough? lol

p.s. I do carry a couple of spares and if needed would slip the tyre off the bead.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 13:01

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 13:01
You still really need a tool to pull it through.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 13:10

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 13:10
.
I presume you are addressing me Shaker? If so....

I already have a suitable device to pull a valve stem through the rim.......
My 'deflator tool' will screw onto the stem after passing it through the rim and would afford a good grip to pull a lubricated stem into position.

Now ask about cracking the bead off the rim!
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Ozhumvee - Monday, Nov 05, 2018 at 06:24

Monday, Nov 05, 2018 at 06:24
I think it really depends firstly on where you are driving, off track and in rough country there is a greater chance of busting them off and also some wheels expose the stems to possible damage more than others.
My breakages were years ago when it was possible to drive on overgrown or non existent tracks in wooded country where fallen timber can break them off.
Doesn't happen much these days as there are so many weekend warriors driving on a decreasing amount of available tracks.
I've only every broken one in desert country on one of those desert grevillieas.
Peter
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 11:47

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 11:47
Allan - For bead-breaking, you carry a metre-long piece of hardwood (a thick 4" x 2" is good - that is, a 4" x 2" sawn oversize on the 2" side).
Picking a piece of good solid hardwood with no flaws, and straight in the grain, is important.

You set your tyre down on some hard ground, valve up, and place the piece of wood at right angles to the rim, and hard up against the rim, near the valve.

You then drive your front wheel carefully up the piece of wood until the front tyre's full weight, is on the flat tyre.
You can use a rubber hammer to assist in the bead-breaking, if the bead is reluctant to move much.

Drive back off the tyre, rotate the rim a few degrees and repeat the process. If necessary, do this several times.
If the bead is still recalcitrant, squirt some detergent around the bead, and keep attacking it by driving up the length of wood.

I've rarely failed to break a bead on vehicle tyres, using this method. Getting good support under the rim is important - if in soft ground, you need to put something solid under the rim to support it.

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 13:34

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 13:34
.
Ah Ron, that "Now ask about cracking the bead" was really a 'Dorothy-Dixer' aimed at Shaker.

I tried your technique on the second front-wheel puncture for the day. Jacked-up the vehicle and removed the wheel, placed it with a plank as described, put the Troopy in 1st and slowly let the clutch out, thump...... it fell off the jack!!!!!

No, seriously, I have a simple and highly effective bead-breaker. It is the gadget shown in my first photo. It attaches to my jack as per the second photo.

The wheel is placed flat on the ground under the towbar with the curved blade positioned on the bead. The rest should be obvious.... several 'bites' and the bead is free.
Yay.... Smallest, simplest bead-breaker on the planet. Fashioned on the tyre-shop machines.

And, for reseating the bead, I have another simple device that does not entail air pressure tanks or hydrocarbon explosions. But that can wait for another time.





Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 18:14

Sunday, Nov 04, 2018 at 18:14
I know a valve stem could get damaged some how at anytime.
But my opinion is that it would most probably be an older valve stem that fails, they do become hard/brittle in time.
A good tyre dealership should be renewing valve stems every time new tyres are fitted. That was my practice anyway.

But that AME qvc tool looks good , but I bet it takes a bit of practice to do it that easy.

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