Question about WA explorers

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 16:11
ThreadID: 137441 Views:1434 Replies:10 FollowUps:12
WA BASED.

Ok so we all know the more well known explorers of WA. Hann, Canning, Carnegie, Forrest, Giles, etc.

My question, if I have a region in mind (desert regions), is there somewhere I can go to see who it was who explored it, so I can do more research on them and the area?

Thanks.
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:01

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:01
Wiki is your friend
Canning stock Route
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:12

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:12
Thanks Ivan, will try the Wiki way as my base to get me started.

CSR is an area that we looked into in the past. Want to research some new areas.
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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:36

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:36
I use Wiki always. Great starting point and they have references at thye bottom of the article
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Reply By: Life Member - Duncan W (WA) - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:45

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 17:45
Try Hesperian Press. http://www.hesperianpress.com/ They publish most of the books about the old explorers.

Cheers

Dunc
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:31

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:31
Thanks Dunc.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 00:00

Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 00:00
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page
The Gutenberg Press publishes many of the explorer's original journals as E-books and they are free. In fact this is a source for many publications where copyright has expired.
For instance …. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/search/?query=ernest+giles
Cheers,
Peter
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:13

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:13
Hi Austag

One early explorer that not too many people are aware of is Samuel Grau Hubbe.

My great, great grandfather was a member of his exploration partly and they travelled from Oodnadatta, travelling through the deserts of WA and visiting a number of locations that had never seen a white person before.

I have the Parliamentary report that was made after the expedition and earlier this year, as part of the "Western Australian Explorers' Diaries Project", Hesperian Press published a great book called:

Samuel Grau Hubbe and the South Australia to Western Australia Stock Route Expedition.

Give Hesperian Press a call, as they are the No 1 Experts for WA Explorers and have all the information that you will need.


Happy Research


Stephen
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:32

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:32
sounds good, thanks Stephen.
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 08:51

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 08:51
Hi Stephen,

I've been aware of your GGF Hubbe's 1896 exploration achievements for a long time, I'm so glad Hesperian got his biography published recently.

Most wouldn’t realise the goal of his expedition, (backed by the SA govt.) was to check the feasibility of establishing a stock route between SA and WA, to feed the meat hungry gold prospectors in the Eastern Goldfields. Of course if feasible this would have given SA pastoralists a new market.

Sadly a stock route from SA wasn’t feasible.

It took the WA Govt 10 years to investigate the CSR being an avenue for supplying beef to the goldfields.

S Hubbe


We threw a tent fly over bushes getting underneath. The camels squatted and poked their heads underneath. The temperature 124ºF. Rudall 30 12 1896

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Reply By: equinox - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:34

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:34
Austag,
You might get more info if you are more specific about the area you are interested in.
Here's some maps you may like anyway.





Cheers
Alan
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Reply By: BobR4 - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:37

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 19:37
Interestingly you did not mention Augustus Charles Gregory who explored north from Perth to the Hamelin Pool 1846 to 1848, then from Victoria River to the interior looking for the inland sea 1855 - 6 and then across to Brisbane because he missed his ship.
Kieran Kelly re-enacted this expedition in 1999 and published his book called Hard Country, Hard Men.
As an Aussie, and South Aussie, I would consider Gregory to be one of our greatest explorers.
See If you can get a copy of the book. You will be inspired to visit some ofthe country he traversed I'm sure.

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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:33

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:33
will definitely do that, thanks Bob.
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Follow Up By: Motherhen - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 00:03

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 00:03
Gregory also explored in the south west. Yesterday I drove past the remains of a tree he blazed in 1845 near Dinninup. The was prior to any white settlement in the area. A bit more here Gregory Tree.
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Follow Up By: BobR4 - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 09:00

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 09:00
There is another Gregory Tree at Timber Ck at the location of the base station of the inland expedition.
At least of equal significance to the dig tree, although I think I'd rather spend an extended time on the Victoia River, with apologies to the Cooper.
I think Gregory was there 5 or 6 years before the Burke & Wills expedition.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 09:13

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 09:13
Hi Rob

Yes Gregory was camped there on the 2nd July 1856.

Cheers


Stephen
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Reply By: lindsay - Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:08

Tuesday, Nov 06, 2018 at 21:08
Google project Gutenberg Australia , they have most of the journals on line. You can go through the list and read from a large list.
Lindsay.
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 00:00

Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 00:00
.
There are books that summarise many Australian explorers.

'Australian Explorers - Unlocking the Great South Land' by Robert Coupe,1998 is one I have.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Les - PK Ranger - Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 06:15

Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 06:15
Quite a lot of Hema 4WD Maps app have explore routes marked, quite pissible they are approx routes I guess.

We drove the northerly tracks fro Cocklebiddy to the Pilbara in June / July and found it very interesting to cross the myriad of interconnected explorer routes all through the state.

These would be the scanned paper Hema Maps great desert series.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 16:20

Wednesday, Nov 07, 2018 at 16:20
A few years ago I wrote an article which lists the main achievements of the key Australian explorers of the 19th Century (not restricted to WA). It includes references to their later life pursuits, and for each explorer you can find out where they are buried, plus obtain details for where you can find any legacy, monument, or namesake that honours them. I have just linked the article to this post, so look at the bottom for the link. Or find it in the Articles section of the site in the Australiana section - Explorers Article
Michelle Martin
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 10:46

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 10:46
Recently retired surveyor, Trevor Moran, published a map showing g explorer and prospector routes in the Eastern Goldfields of WA.

Trevor Moran map


We threw a tent fly over bushes getting underneath. The camels squatted and poked their heads underneath. The temperature 124ºF. Rudall 30 12 1896

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Follow Up By: Greg J1 - Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 16:46

Thursday, Nov 08, 2018 at 16:46
Hi Phil. Doesn’t the look of that fella make you want to sit and yarn to him.

There’s a lifetime of experience in the bush written all over his face.

Can’t say I’ve ever heard anything about him before but he looks the sort of bloke who I’d love to have a port with around the fire in the middle of nowhere.

Cheers Greg.
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