Solar cable etc

Submitted: Thursday, Dec 06, 2018 at 21:23
ThreadID: 137527 Views:1033 Replies:6 FollowUps:18
Hi guys ran wiring from engine bay to rear tub for my dual battery setup. Used 8b&s cable and put an anderson plug on the end which will plug into my battery box.

I bought a 160 w solar panel and regulator and the panel only has a 4mm lead on it which I wired straight into regulator. I want to wire 8b&s cable from my battery box to the regulator but the cable won't fit in the terminals. Any suggestions or anyone else had similar issues?
Cheers
Adam
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Thursday, Dec 06, 2018 at 21:42

Thursday, Dec 06, 2018 at 21:42
Cut the required amount of strands of copper off the cable till it fits
AnswerID: 622480

Reply By: Malcom M - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 06:28

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 06:28
what sort of terminals are they?

You can get different sized connectors to fit lots of different terminals...
AnswerID: 622484

Follow Up By: Adam D6 - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:30

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:30
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Reply By: Shaker - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 08:29

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 08:29
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Follow Up By: Adam D6 - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:31

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:31
I tried bootlace crimp but even they wouldn't fit in
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Follow Up By: Malcom M - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:51

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:51
Bootlace Ferrules are not what you want here. You need what Shaker has pictured above.
These come in a huge range of sizes and a lot will fit the Phoenix connectors.
Suggest you drop into an electrical wholesaler and see what they have.
Alternatively, a lot of electronics specialists will have them but they may not be so accessible to you (not the Jaycars etc)


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Follow Up By: Nomadic Navara - Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 14:47

Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 14:47
What is the industry name for those terminals?
PeterD
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 15:36

Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 15:36
Peter, they are pin connectors and are really good in chocke blocks
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 16:37

Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 16:37
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Peter,

Each and every manufacturer/distributor seems to have a different description for these products.
I first knew them as "Faston Connectors" but that name seems to have gone, at least from the Australian market. They are now made by a number of manufacturers.

The most common description is "Automotive Insulated Crimp Terminals" (or similar) although they are not in fact "terminals" but connectors, and are sometimes known as that.
They come in 'eye or ring', 'fork', 'flat blade', 'bullet' and 'pin' forms and a few variations on that. The 'eye' type in several hole sizes and the 'blade' type in three widths, 6.35mm being the most common.
They are graded into 3 cable sizes identified by the insulating sleeve colour.
Available from automotive accessory shops and Jaycar etc.
A specialised tool is required for crimping, although in emergency I have used blunt side cutters with success although someone will now proclaim that I must have a ratchet crimp tool for Best Practice. lol

This "Wattmaster" catalogue is about the best presentation I have.


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Allan

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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 17:40

Saturday, Dec 08, 2018 at 17:40
Utilux's official designation is and insulated pin connector but they only go up to 6mm. 8mm and up are called a stalk lugs as 8 mm and above cable is classed as battery cable so thus they are lugs
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 10:07

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 10:07
They are easier to obtain through an electrical wholesaler than an automotive parts reseller.
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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 11:35

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 11:35
True Shaker. I'm an Auto Elec and I dont have them and neither do my suppliers. I'd have to order them in.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 13:37

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 13:37
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Shaker and Ivan,

I was answering Peter when I said..."Available from automotive accessory shops and Jaycar etc."
Maybe you don't have them Ivan but I have just done a search and the following list them:
Super Cheap, Bursons, Auto One, Autobarn and Jaycar. Probably many more but how far do I need to search to justify what I say? All these are more known and accessible to a layman than an electrical wholesaler.
Do you get some weird satisfaction from refuting every thing that I say?

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Allan

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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:52

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:52
I was staying on thread as to no confuse the original post with irrelevant garbage. And all Peter asked was what they were called. He could have googled the rest of the bullshit as easily as you did. :-)
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Reply By: Member - Bigfish - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:20

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:20
You will only get 8-9 amps from your panel under ideal conditions (which wont be often) so you can get away with smaller wire. Ensure you put regulator as close to the battery as practical as well. Use the 8b&s from regulator to panel. As commented on ..cut some of the copper to thin the terminal...then solder!
AnswerID: 622495

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:35

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 09:35
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I agree that it can be acceptable to trim some cable strands in order to fit into a terminal but DO NOT SOLDER the strands if it is a clamping-type terminal. A soldered bunch of cable strands becomes a leaden mass upon soldering and with time "cold flow" occurs such that the clamping force is diminished and poor contact occurs. That is not just "my opinion", it is industry standard practice.

Soldering is of course acceptable to attach a cable to a suitable lug.
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Gronk - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 14:45

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 14:45
For a low amp condition like a solar panel, trimming strands may be acceptable, but for higher amp conditions it is VERY unacceptable. Just bad practice.
The above lugs are a far better solution, and cheap as..
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 16:08

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 16:08
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Well Gronk, we were talking about a "low amp condition like a solar panel' were we not, so why introduce "higher amp conditions" ?
But let's look at this from a rational engineering aspect rather than hand-on-the-heart Best Practice.

Adam said that he was using 8B&S cable. This has a nominal copper diameter of 4mm and a cross-section of 8mm2. If he were to use a 'Yellow' pin-crimp lug it will just accept that cable. However, such lug has a pin diameter of 2mm. This is actually formed by rolling the flat metal to form the pin and it is hollow, thus the actual cross-sectional area is approx 2mm-sq. Is this reduction from 8mm-sq to 2mm-sq any improvement in current carrying capacity or "good practice"

Further to the above, the addition of the crimp-pin introduces an extra joint in the circuit. Best Practice would prescribe that this crimp should be made using a good-quality ratchet crimp tool. Is it likely that Adam would have such a tool or be prepared to purchase one for just this single job?

Cable sizing on vehicle accessories is almost always selected on minimising circuit volt-drop and results in grossly oversized conductors than is necessary for simple current-carrying capacity. Accordingly, reducing the cable strands within limits is acceptable from an engineering point of view.

EDIT: I just went and measured a couple of 'Yellow' crimp-pin connectors in my stock. Their cable insert hole measured at 3.3mm dia. So if 8B&S cable is actually 4.11mm diameter as my tables nominate, then such connectors would not be suitable here without reducing the strands anyway. What now Gronk?

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Gronk - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:25

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:25
What now Gronk?

I don't recall mentioning YELLOW crimp lugs ??

If you want to say cutting strands from a cable is acceptable, good luck to you..
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:43

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 21:43
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..."The above lugs are a far better solution, and cheap as.."

Which colour were you proposing from the "above" selection then?
If Adam's 8mm2 cable will not fit the terminal and will not fit the "above lugs" what is it you were proposing?

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Gronk - Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 22:13

Sunday, Dec 09, 2018 at 22:13
Getting pedantic about a reply. The ABOVE lugs were a generalisation.

You above all know you can buy 10mm2 pin lugs, so shove the 8mm2 wire into one of them. !! Solder or crimp it, I don't really care !!
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 15:32

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 15:32
Ok fellas, if the 'above lugs' are the way to go, please what does one call them when trying to source them?

We threw a tent fly over bushes getting underneath. The camels squatted and poked their heads underneath. The temperature 124ºF. Rudall 30 12 1896

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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 20:22

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 20:22
Those lugs dont come big enough. Biggest you'll get is 5-6mm and are garbage
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Reply By: Batt's - Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 23:19

Friday, Dec 07, 2018 at 23:19
I used Narva twin core 6mm wire on my solar panel which is larger than the wire that came with the panel. It fits into the regulator without a problem no need to trim the wire. The panel is fixed to the canopy roof of my twin cab runs to the regulator in the dash then to the allrounder starter battery around 5 - 6mts of cable. It has no problem suppling enough power to the battery to keep it topped up even when the fridge is running.
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