A dedicated recovery hook that slides into a standard tow-hitch box.

Submitted: Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 20:17
ThreadID: 13797 Views:7037 Replies:9 FollowUps:8
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Had a few mates round for a barby last night and the subject of recovery was yarned about for hours.
I know there was talk about using tow hitches as a recovery point and the posible fall-outs of doing so about 2...3 weeks ago.
Anyway.......the subject of tow bars and recovery came up and my mate headed of to his 79 series and came back with a dedicated 10,000LBS tow hook that slides into a standard tow-hitch box called a "Bush Hook".
Seems extremly sturdy and to me, comes across as a great recovery point.
Apparently cost him $85 and was purchased from a mob called "Outback Ideas".

Just thought I'd share this with ya's! I'll be adding one to my recovery baggie very soon.

Email: outbackideas@three.com.au
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Reply By: Rob from Cairns Offroad Training & Tours - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 21:46

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 21:46
Why bother, just push your strap into the receiver and push the pin thru. I train my people using this method and have done litterally hundreds of recoveries from deep sand using this method no bent pin or any other adverse effects. $85 for a dedicated recovery hook held in place by the same pin Doh!! Cheers Rob
PS for only another $75 you can by a small piece of pressed tin called a "hiclone"
AnswerID: 63332

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:00

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:00
Rob hit it on the head, why bother, $85 wasted really...
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Follow Up By: Member - glenno (QLD) - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 23:12

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 23:12
As long as it is a straight pull . Slings and straps and sharp edges dont mix .
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 10:59

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 10:59
Rob,
Please tell us more about the hiclone ;-)

Leroy
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Reply By: Muddy 'doe (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:03

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:03
I saw one of these on the weekend and it did look like the go. It had an upwards facing hook with a small retaining latch to stop the strap slipping back out. I know that you would be fine just using the pin but this seems better, particularly if you get stuck in a deepish puddle and the towbar is just below the water level. Much easier to slip the strap eye over the hook than to frig around feeling for a pin hole in the slushy stuff. And if you drop the pin you are really having fun!

I also know that it might also be prudent to put the pin through the strap PRIOR to going through something sticky and then putting the rest of the strap on the roof or wrapped around the spare but how many of us would actually do that???

Just my opinion.
Steven

AnswerID: 63336

Follow Up By: cokeaddict - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:30

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 22:30
Hi Steven,
In answer to your question mate.....I do, every time. Costs nothing to think ahead, after all ya just dont know ay !
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Follow Up By: Member - Bernie. (Vic) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 02:05

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 02:05
Hi Coke how did you go with the guy casing the house ??
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Follow Up By: Gajm (VIC) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 10:19

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 10:19
Yeah Coke fill us in, and did you get the reply info I Mem messaged you with?
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Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 23:14

Tuesday, Jun 15, 2004 at 23:14
Alex,

I think your mate had too many beers around the barbie. I think the correct figure might have been closer to $65 not $85.
It is a product that you want or don't want. It is convenient to just slip on the strap plus you don't have to muck around getting down on your knees in the mud water or whatever and you don't worry about dropping the pins in the mud.
Some towbars now come with bolts through the receiver rather than pins making the attachment of straps harder/longer.

Also women doing the training courses find it much easier to hook on the strap. we have all spent that kind of money on things in the past so it is just another one of those things that people will buy if they want too.
AnswerID: 63351

Follow Up By: Member - Bernie. (Vic) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 01:57

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 01:57
Snatched a 100series with my one in the Little Desert at Easter no probs my end, other driver suffered nasty cut on 2 fingers ( yes should had gloves on) trying to clear a hole to get pin out, then stuff around to get strap & pin in. As Steven & David said drop a pin in the mud etc.
Why put the strap on all the time maybe getting it dirty even if you dont use it ( what a waste of time).
On some vehicles the pin is up & under the rear step.

IMHO best money spent after buying the strap

Cheers
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Reply By: Member - Brian (Gold Coast) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 07:17

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 07:17
I don't agree with using the "strap-in-the-hitch-secured-by-the-pin" method (Bent pins, torn skin, torn straps etc), but wanted a quick conveniant way to attach the strap. So I bought a rated hook from ARB ($15) and mounted it, using highest grade high tensile nuts and bolts, on a spare "tongue" that resides in the drawer until it's needed. Usually if the terrain is such that I think I'll need the recovery point on (for others or for us) then it gets put on first, so we're not 'dicking" around trying to "lose" the pin in the mud.
Works for us!
AnswerID: 63363

Reply By: Gajm (VIC) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 11:01

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 11:01
I just emailed the guy to find out a bit more info, and got a reply with in 30 mins, $60 posted in Vic, and $65 east coast. I use the pin method too, but I might put one of these on the list, each to his own
AnswerID: 63398

Follow Up By: Gajm (VIC) - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 11:05

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 11:05
I just checked the email and ther's a follow up from John, the guy who makes these. "there are three styles of Bush Hook two slide in the hitch one has an M20 eye nut rated 20000lb the third will bolt to the rear of GQ and GU Patrols replacing the loop" now i definitly want one
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Reply By: Pluto - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 12:22

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 12:22
I know others have mentioned they don't see any advantage in these devices. However they do eliminate the chance of bending the tow pin and the subsequent damage to your tow bar.

ARB also sell a similar hitch that gives you a shackle lug style recovery point. I've carried one for quite a while. It also provides better winching point.
AnswerID: 63409

Reply By: kiwi2 - Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 16:40

Wednesday, Jun 16, 2004 at 16:40
Is there a good reason why you shouldn't remove the tow ball and put a rated shackle through the hole? You could still lose a pin in the mud but it's not as fiddly or out-of-the-way as the pin and its retaining clip (and you would avoid the sharp edges of the receiver hole if fitting directly to the pin).
AnswerID: 63457

Reply By: Swerv - Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 21:36

Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 21:36
Hi Fellas

Just thought you might be interested check out the website bigballsoffroad.com and they have what they call a hitch receiver. It's a solid bit of metal with the ends turned down to accomodate a bow shackle. Looks like a good bit of kit to me.
AnswerID: 64289

Reply By: kiwi2 - Tuesday, Jun 22, 2004 at 16:59

Tuesday, Jun 22, 2004 at 16:59
Swerv,

That idea's neater but not very different from what I suggested. Why not just fit the shackle pin through the towball hole on your standard towing hitch and save $60?
AnswerID: 64437

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