Thermal cookers

Submitted: Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 17:28
ThreadID: 138019 Views:1300 Replies:5 FollowUps:1
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Hi, we have just bought our first ever thermal cooker. You know the ones where you cook your stew or whatever up in the internal pot on the stove and when it's boiling you put it into the big outside pot and leave it in there to finish cooking for up to 6 hours. It's like a dream pot but we got ours from Aldi. Has anyone managed to poison themselves from one of these pots? Is it likely that you could get food poisoning from them. Is it advisable to have a thermometer to check the temp of the food when you go to eat it? Any tips and tricks that you have learnt about using them? They would be good for making soups too wouldn't they? Cheers Toni
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Reply By: Bushranger1 - Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 18:07

Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 18:07
Been using our dreampot for years with no problems.
Great for preparing dinner in the morning then going out walking all day.
Just find that on really cold days you need to heat things up a bit before serving up the meal.
Cheers Stu.
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Reply By: Member - johnat - Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 19:37

Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 19:37
We've been using a similar system for years! It is not that different from a sous-vide slow cooking in that the food is kept at a cooking temperature whilever it is in the outer.
Our fave is corned silverside - usually sold by butchers etc in cryovac bags already, so just need to heat to boiling and put in the outer at brekky, and have superb corned meat at dinner time. Ideal for those of us who work away from home, the meal (apart from the accompanying veges) is ready when we get home from town.

If you are concerned about food poisoning, I'd suggest that you give whatever is cooked in there, a "finish off" over actual heat before serving.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 21:01

Sunday, Mar 24, 2019 at 21:01
I have the thermos Shuttle Chef - please read this from their website Link to food safety

There are rules such as no more than 8hrs, avoid certain ingredients and always cook properly to get it started.
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Reply By: Kilcowera Station Stay - Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 07:30

Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 07:30
Thanks to the 3 who answered me. I had hoped to get some great recipes from you all. Cheers Toni
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Reply By: Member - John and Lynne - Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 08:18

Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 08:18
When people on another forum tested the Aldi Pot against other brands it did just as well. The idea is not new - during wartime fuel rationing straw or hay boxes were used the same way,
If you follow the instructions your food will not fall below a safe temperature.
We have found ours very good for simple hearty soups - put it on before going out and a meal is ready when you return and a soup is very quick to prepare.
As for recipes you can really cook any stew or soup that has a reasonable liquid content. You can brown or not brown meat, onions etc depending on how keen/lazy you feel when preparing dinner before lunch.
It is possible to overcook some food to our taste - a bit of practice will soon tell you how long your favourite recipes need. Our Eco Pot gives minimum times for cooking - six hours is still quite safe but we find it too long for some dishes.
I tend to add a bit of extra spice or herbs to dishes as the long slow cooking can reduce the flavour of some but that depends on your taste and recipe.
You don't need special recipes - just try any of your simple favourites. Lynne
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Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 19:32

Wednesday, Mar 27, 2019 at 19:32
Recipes that are usually slow, long cooking stuff will be great.
Anything you can cook sous vide (vacuum packed and long slow cook) would work really well in these cookers.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

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