Travel Photography - Gear - Editing - Sharing

Over the years its been fascinating to see the changes and improvements to camera gear and technology but also the options for sharing our photography with one another.

If you haven't got into this hobby/passion and want to get started, you only need an eye for composition and the willingness to experiment as the equipment and editing tools are so powerful you can fix most mistakes.

But, as good as you might think your smartphone or tablet/iPad camera is, it's no match for a true DSLR camera or a good Drone and thankfully these days there is a product to suit all budgets.

So I thought I'd get this post started and put together a basic outline of the issues you need to address:

1. Stop using your phone/tablet/iPad for your best travel photography - its ok for convenience, and for snaps of Places, and ad-hoc memories but the quality is just not there if you ever want to enlarge the image and print it and you cannot correct the image quality other than using the inbuilt "filters" or "apps".

2. When buying a Digital SLR camera (DSLR) there is a product to suit all budgets and needs. But do your research. Here's a good article I just quickly Googled if you want some buying tips - How to buy a DSLR camera. Take a read, then pop back here and ask some questions.

3. Once you have your DSLR, the next thing is to learn to use it. If you're just going to use the AUTO mode, you're probably wasting your money on a DSLR camera and may as well get a point and shoot compact camera. You must learn to shoot in MANUAL - as that's how you make the difference between a great photo and a "snap". And you must shoot in RAW if you want to be able to correct your images (shadows, highlights, colour, exposure - once you learn how easy it is to edit, you'll see it's like waving a magic wand over your images).

4. Next you'll see how much storage space your RAW images take up so you'll need a way to store all these GBs of images you'll quickly accumulate. Of course your camera will most likely use SD cards so when travelling it is sensible to have plenty of SD cards when one fills up. Some people manage to download the files off the SD card and then reformat to allow reuse of the SD card but only do so if you are confident that your downloaded files are backed up. If not, wait until you're back home or somewhere secure before reformatting those SD cards. Using a combination of disk drive/physical media storage as well as cloud storage is the norm these days. But do your research as pricing and services varies considerably.

5. You'll also need an image editing program, and a system for viewing/cataloguing your thousands of photos. Get yourself onto Adobe Creative Cloud and sign up for Lightroom - its both an image catalogue and image editing program.

6. Very soon you'll be so impressed with your photos you'll want to share them. Here's a few ways you can reach out to a very wide group of people that will be keen to see your photos -

* post your photos and video using your own social media media accounts and just add in our hashtags #exploroz #exploroztraveller #eotopo (for Instagram) or @exploroz @exploroztraveller (for Facebook) to share them across to all our audiences

* Upload photos to Places - simply locate the correct Place listing for the location where your photo was taken, and look for the Add Photos button.

* post your own travel story in Blogs - you can write up your story, upload photos, you can also upload video (but it has to already be stored in YouTube or Vimeo - just click the Embed Video link and follow the prompts to insert it), and you can also insert a map showing the route of your journey (click embed User Treks). Anyone that has the ExplorOz Traveller app can create a User Trek using the Positions Manager that records your position data when you travel, but only Members can create Blogs.

I'll open this post for comments, questions, etc but also invite input from other photographic enthusiasts to help respond. It's a huge subject and loads of options to suit all budgets but the basic principles are the same. It's quite an exciting era for photography and it can be a very rewarding pastime so I urge anyone, in particular those that are retired and travelling to give it a go!
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

Back Reply Expand Un-Read 5 Moderator

Reply By: GarryR - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:28

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:28
Hi Michelle, yes I do own a couple of dslr cameras that I take with me for photography as I am also a member of our local camera club. Yes, taking photos in raw is the best option to get all the relevant information, but as you state, memory cards are a big factor. Those that are not familiar to what you state is that most people that pictures in a format called jpeg with a photo size of about 60-70 kb where as in the raw format your photos can be as much as 20+ mb Yes MB. hence you require big card memory. These memory cards are not cheap, as I use a fast card of 120mb/sec read factor at $140- a card, and only a small card in memory. Yes I agree that Lightroom is a great tool for editing, and fairly simply to use, where as I also have photoshop that I rarely using due to its complexity (standard joke 2years to learn it and 10yrs to master it - if your lucky). I also carry a good tripod for long exposure as well as a 5 in 1 reflector for some of my macro work. Should people wish to go down the road of purchasing a DSLR camera, I would suggest that they seek out their local camera club and have a visit and ask questions first. You can get great results out of a good point and shoot without spending thousands of dollars on equipment they may never use much. Yes, I have spent in excess of $3500- on a camera body only and lenses up to $3200-, that makes it quite an expense exercise, and does not mean you take a better photo. I may take a 1000 frames and delete 950+ due to quality or composition. I could go on forever, but.... As for me, I am not computer literate enough to download into blogs etc, only editing and printing for comps. By the way people must also understand that you cannot print from a raw photo, you must convert it back to jpeg to get printed at your local print shop. Photography can be a lot of fun, but to get more proficient at taking a good photo, be adventurous and take your settings off auto and start learning what your manual settings can do. YOU will be amazed at the results that you achieve and may be want to go further in the wonderful field of photography.
location - Warragul -Victoria
life is too short, so out and about enjoy

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624751

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:40

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:40
Hey Gary, great to get your input.
I must say though, that making a blog on ExplorOz is far easier than taking a photo and using editing software so you are more than capable. So here's a quick summary of how you can do a blog...

Go to the top left of the website, click menu, then click Blogs - then look on the screen for the orange button that says New Blog - press that. This will open the draft window of your first new blog. Simply type text into the box just like a Forum post - click the grey buttons below to add in stuff (eg. click the button that says Add Photos) and this will open a window showing the file structure on your computer so you locate your image as a jpg and then it will begin uploading to the blog page. It will put the photo whereever you have your cursor at the time of clicking the button. So if you want it between paragraphs press the button when your cursor is in between the 2 paragraphs of text you've written in the blog.

Also just like in the Forum, there is a preview button to allow you to check what it looks like before finished. And just like in the Forum there is the submit button which is what you press to publish your blog.

Note - blogs have a setting to allow you to keep the page invisible until you are ready. You still submit it (to save your work) but until you flag the page as visible you can keep it hidden from view. Shouldn't be too hard for a fella like you.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 898248

Reply By: GarryR - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:55

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:55
Thanks for the info Michelle but, I can read what you say to a good extent but do not understand what you say as I suffer from dyslexia. I rely on spell check and Judy to help me out and explain. Un fortunately I am a hands on person and learn by workshops. I am not fully retired, and spare time is taken up with grandpa day care for 2 1/2 year old and a 9month old 2 days a week, but will try when my daughter or Judy has time.
location - Warragul -Victoria
life is too short, so out and about enjoy

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624752

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:59

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 18:59
That's ok Garry, its amazing what we can talk ourselves out of - or what we can accomplish when we want to. Like most things, just don't over think it!
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 898249

Reply By: GarryR - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 19:12

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 19:12
Question - what is the maximum size jpeg is required or allowable? I have some jpegs are in excess of 1.2mb after reformatting which could be a problem for computer download or upload for some people
location - Warragul -Victoria
life is too short, so out and about enjoy

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624753

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 19:16

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 19:16
Depends where you are sending the image. If you are emailing an image you really have to keep the file small, yes around 2MB but if you are uploading to our website (eg. blogs, or Places) then just keep it at the full size jpg no compression required. Our system handles the resizing for you and at the other end people viewing the page are not downloading large images, so its all done for you. Times have changed. Same with instagram or facebook - any site that allows you to upload will usually now have a resize function built in making it easy for you. ie. the system can handle a 32MB image upload.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 898252

Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 23:37

Monday, Apr 01, 2019 at 23:37
.
I cannot agree with "dumping the phone".

Roz uses an iPhone for all her shots and from them produces a photobook of each trek. She is an accomplished photographer having in the past used SLR, both film and digital with success. The 8x10 pages of her photobooks display Roz's excellent compositional skill and they quite astonish me with their reproduction quality. It is more than equal to the task.

Certainly, if you wish to compete at club level then your technical quality will come under scrutiny, but if you simply wish to produce images that are of pictorial value then almost all modern cameras, whether SLR, compact, or even a good phone are capable of rendering a worthwhile result.

I too discarded the heavy DSLR that I had been using. It was just so unwieldy hanging from my neck whilst rock-hopping. I now favour a much lighter mirrorless fixed lens camera with its benefit of image stabilisation.

As for image editing programs, the 'auto' functions within the modern camera do an excellent job of securing presentable exposures. They free the photographer from managing the variables of exposure and allow concentration on composition. I am all in favour of completing the exercise within the camera and abhor the tedium of using the computer to edit the shot. Maybe a tweak on the exposure but no more. Occaisionally use Photoshop to remove the power pole that just could not be avoided but no more.

The "Image Doctor" pages of Australian Photography magazine seem to offer much more critique of composition than of technical exposure. Certainly, poor exposure will ruin the shot but a modern camera on auto will do a pretty fair job of most situations. Some of the best shots I ever achieved were among those early black-and-white images taken with a box camera with absolutely no controls other than the shutter release. It was all in the composition. If you are able, look at the photographs taken by the famed street-photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson. The technical quality took second place to the subject matter and composition.

Do not be prepossed with the technical quality of your camera. Study and concentrate on the subject.

It has often been said that "the best camera" is the one you have with you.









Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

AnswerID: 624755

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 12:34

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 12:34
It really depends on the subject you are shooting and the available light that is hitting the processor (varies if you have different lenses/focal length etc).

There is no denying that the cameras in today's smartphones do a fantastic job but they just don't compare to the DSLR when light is low or when zoom is required or when the object is moving. For me, that is a lot of scenarios...

Like you, I have spent the past few years leaving my DSLR at home and using my phone for convenience, especially when capturing family or sporting moments. In the last 6 years or so, my youngest kiddo (now about to turn 15) has been horseriding a few times a week and I've filmed an extreme amount of photos and videos. All outdoors in all types of weather conditions. Most days I would take about 30 minutes worth of video (across perhaps 15 videos) and around 50 photos. Sometimes taking photo/video of other people and their horses too, which then need to be shared back to them. It's been a massive undertaking to work out the best way to:

1. play back the videos/display the photos on home tv to show others
2. move the images off the phone quickly to media storage as phone storage gets full quickly
3. ensure both of us have access to the shared storage location from our different devices/accounts
4. build clips/edit images from our separate accounts using different editing programs and different device platforms (kiddo on iPad, me on PC desktop and/or Android phone)
5. avoid clogging up our internet usage by too much file sharing/downloading
6. avoid duplication of images across the network

We've gone full circle in how we achieve this. Originally using my Samsung phone camera and using Dropbox for auto syncing to our home network when I walk through the door. However this was consuming far too much bandwidth and the video uploads would get stuck and after a week the files would still not appear. I was getting caught out not knowing if the files had all uploaded and if I could delete the images off the phone storage before the next outing and the internet was just getting slow.... The use of shared Dropbox folders for different network users meant that files were being duplicated across the user profiles to each device that was opened to access the files so this was very inefficient.

We eventually solved it by installing a NAS box and stopped using phone to capture images. Not only did that stop the use of Dropbox file transfer because I transfered the files directly off the SD card into the computer and into the selected file storage on the hard drives but this put the DSLR back in my hands so I started shooting in RAW and using Lightroom to make quick adjustments. The results were instantly obvious - like chalk and cheese. I simply don't bother using my phone camera at all now when I need to take photos.

Mind you, I have a very good quality DSLR. Canon6DMk2 but also have an older Canon 50D. I store all the files in an import folder in RAW then select some files to work on in Lightroom and export the adjusted jgps to a separate folder catalogued by month. I can access the edited JPG files from my phone using QFile, which allows me to directly share to Instagram etc. I have been building video clips with music etc using Windows Movie Maker and my kiddo uses their iPad and iMovie.

When translated to outback situations, if I want to take photos of animals they are usually a fair distance away or moving fast (roos, emus, birds, lizards) and the use of a long lens vs a phone camera with zoom is not going to be comparable. In low light situations such as sunrise, sunset and around the campfire you will get a better result using a DSLR if you know what you're doing. In all situations, you can get those magic creative shots that play on light, and capture the real essence of colours, and get more emotion in your photos by playing with depth of field settings. For many people you can also overcome the typical problem of arriving at a magical scene only to realise it doesn't look its best in the harsh midday light. With a DSLR you can certainly do a lot of adjustments either in camera if you know what you're doing, or post-production using Lightroom. (I don't bother with photoshop or anything too time consuming).

However, the phone camera is excellent for still life - especially close-up macro style of flowers, and does a lovely job with a bright day scene of vehicles and campsites and the landscape as a backdrop. It also does a wonderful job when taking photos of signboards, structures, landmarks and other static objects especially in very bright light which is typical for daytime in the outback.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 898278

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:49

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:49
.
My Lord, "15 videos and 50 photos per day"..... how do you get time to make the beds? LOL

But yes, I wholeheartedly agree that a full-blown camera, be it DSLR, mirrorless, or whatever, has it all over a phone camera. It is however a solid learning curve to get an SLR off the auto setting and produce consistent good results.

I guess why Roz can produce such good photos is that she is mostly shooting from the viewpoint of the human eye as she portrays the photobook pages to be as-seen by the eye. It is a selective process. Zoom is out. Even flower closeup is taken from the distance of human observation. It doesn't make the shots better, just realistic and simpler. And if we do need a rare shot demanding more, I come in with the Sony mirrorless.

I just didn't want the iPhone discounted completely. Within their limits they do a brilliant job. And are always at hand.



Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 898285

Reply By: Member - nickb "boab" - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 07:38

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 07:38
All though having several thousand dollars worth of camera gear most photos I seem to take are from my Samsung phone which takes a great snap easy editors in phone and uploaded to social media of my meal coffee etc along with some sunrises and flowers LOL:))
Photos from the phone are no match for a good quality digital camera but would be far better quality than some of the old clunkers
Not to mention time spent " wasted " editing raw photos that we are ever unlikely to look at a gain
I often upload photos to my local camera club Facebook page and get asked from time to time on what camera did I take this photo , I can imagine their eyes rolling when I say from my S7 lol :))
Cheers Nick b
VKS 737 ( 0915 )
Wish the missus was as dirty as the tailgate of me bus ;))

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624757

Reply By: Barry H12 - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 13:50

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 13:50
Hi Michelle,

Great topic. I would argue the best thing you can do is to purchase the best lens you can afford for the type of photography you do. The camera is not as important, yes it is nice to have the features of the modern day DSLR, but the lens is the thing that will help improve your photography.

I did a 33 day trip through China with a Canon 400D (dinosaur) and a Tamron 18-270 mm lens, and never missed out on a shot.

Second trip (45 days) was with my much loved Canon 7D, same Tamron lens and a Canon 50 mm (nifty fifty) not too much gear to carry and it worked out just fine.

Lens's rule.

Regards

Barry H
AnswerID: 624759

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:26

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:26
Yes in principle that is quite true - but its not the focal length but the f-stop, as I'm sure you know, that determines a good lens. It's all about the light - we have some f/1.8 and f/2.8 lenses and they make an incredible difference in using available light compared to the f/3.8 and f/4.5 lens. BUT those low f/stops come at a massive price!

On the flip side, the modern cameras have come a long way. And the other way of dealing with light is ISO. You can buy a camera now with such high ISO you don't need to use a tripod in low light (no flash). Our Canon6DMk2 has a max ISO of 40,000 (but of course I have never used it). ISO can cause too much grain but if used in conjunction with a great lens you can get brilliant results in really tricky light. The 6D was bought for our son who is a freelance photographer and creative media student, but I've been using it with the horses as mentioned above. His usage is often at rock concerts indoor where no flash or tripod can be used but where the light changes rapidly from pitch black to glaring flashing white or coloured lights and smoke. For him, the combination of low f/stop and long lens as well as higher ISO is simply tools of the trade.

Photography has always been and will always be all about light.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 898281

Reply By: David G (WA) - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:07

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:07
Michelle, what is a RAW image?

Cheers
AnswerID: 624760

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:35

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:35
DSLR cameras allow you to select the file format of the captured picture. If you select RAW you can utilise the image information as seen by the camera's digital sensor before it has been compressed into an image format where it some of this information is lost.

In RAW format you can use image editing tools that allow you to modify parts of the image that are lost after jpg compression. I am no expert but here is a link to an article that seems to outline it rather well, 10 reasons why you should shoot in RAW
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 898282

Follow Up By: David G (WA) - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:55

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:55
Thanks Michelle.
0
FollowupID: 898286

Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 12:38

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 12:38
More importantly, RAW files are not changed in any way by the sensor/camera before being stored. There is zero compression, there is zero loss of detail.
I have revisited old RAW files taken some years ago, and with the newer Photoshop program, recovered detail that was not visible in earlier attempts. The less you "muck around" with an image in the first place, the more likely it is that you can get the detail out of it.

As for jpg - this is a "lossy compression" file manipulation that, if you use it in camera reduces the size of the file to be stored. While that can be an advantage sometimes, it does ensure that you'll never get the detail back.
Also, every time you save a jpg file, regardless of whether you have changed anything or not, the process reduces the detail in the file. JPEG (originally devised by the Japan Photographic Expert Group, hence the initials) uses a process to reduce the file size by looking at each pixel, and then comparing it with the surrounding ones to come up with a sort of average for all sorts of measures (including rgb, luminosity etc) and storing that. This process is carried out for every pixel in the image. If you open a jpg file, and then save it again, the process is repeated for each pixel. Repeating this process every time a file is saved results in a halo effect on the edges of sections of the image - known as JPEG artifacts. They mean that enlarging the image, or even viewing it at magnification, you can see the "blurriness" of the outline.

RAW does not change anything in the image, hence most photographers shoot RAW, and edit later.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 898363

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 14:38

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 14:38
.

If a .jpg file is simply opened to view with no manipulation then simply closing it causes no file change. However, some Image Editors may incur loss, even following no image manipulation, if the command 'Save' or 'Save As' is used after viewing in the Editor. That includes even when simply renaming the file. Better to rename in a File Manager than in an Editor.
If the file is manipulated in any way in an image editor then yes, upon saving the edited image, some losses are incurred.

Some camera users may not be aware that their camera may offer higher resolution .jpg settings. Raising the setting to a higher resolution from the default is beneficial although at the expense of larger file size thus limiting the number of stored exposures.

This JPG Myths and Facts link may be useful to some.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 898371

Reply By: pmk03 - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:33

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:33
Have been using a Canon 550D (yes another dinosaur) for years but got tired of carrying different lenses & never having the correct one with me.
Just replaced it with a Lumix FZ1000 Bridge camera, I know not an SLR but has all the functions with only the one lens 24-400mm. Still learning on it but so far very impressed.
Also use a DJI Spark Drone & Go Pro
We back up all our pics while travelling to daily files on an external hard drive. That makes for easier sorting when we get home. Plus also helps us to remember where they were taken.
As far as sharing we have recently set up a YouTube Channel & upload to there.
PMK3AUSTRALIA (if I'm allowed to say on here)
We have just about finished catching up with video dating back 20 years of travelling. Quality of some of the earlier is a bit rough and we're certainly no pros.
Just like having one spot I can keep all our records of out trips around this great country.
We do use our iPhones but mostly just to upload on facebook so out friends & family know where we are.
Cheers
Paul
AnswerID: 624761

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:36

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:36
Hey Paul, please share some of your YouTube videos here then! Take a look at the original post I put up at the bottom with various methods/options.
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

1
FollowupID: 898283

Follow Up By: pmk03 - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:56

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:56
Ok I will - when I get some time
Thanks,
Paul
0
FollowupID: 898287

Reply By: Member - Warren H - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:40

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:40
I think the most outstanding advance in the last perhaps 5 years has been the improvement in S/N of sensors, particularly full frame. The Sony sensor used in the Nikon D800/Sony A3 II/Pentax K 1D is simply outstanding, the dynamic range improvement was just such a leap forward. The ability to dial up an effectively noiseless high ISO as well as recover shadow detail just changes the way you think about capturing an image.
I agree that many of us under-invest in good glass, though the cost of a high quality relatively fast long lens for birding is eye watering.
I use Adobe CC for my photography. I almost exclusively use Lightroom and seldom resort to Photoshop. Some glitches last year with LR updates that corrupted catalogues at about the same time as a WIN 10 update that required manual changes to write permissions for Adobe products gave me a couple of days of grief working out what was going on and made me think about alternatives.
NT Pajero
2007 Goldstream Crown

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624762

Follow Up By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:42

Tuesday, Apr 02, 2019 at 14:42
ABSOLUTELY!
Can't imagine the stress you went through with the LR update :(
Michelle Martin
Customer Support - ExplorOz & ExplorOz Traveller

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 898284

Reply By: Nacho - Friday, Apr 05, 2019 at 10:29

Friday, Apr 05, 2019 at 10:29
Phone for day time point n shoot...and shoot in landscape not portrait.
DSLR for night time fun.
AnswerID: 624794

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Saturday, Apr 06, 2019 at 11:45

Saturday, Apr 06, 2019 at 11:45
Nacho...

You do know that isn’t what they mean by “flashing” don’t you?

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

0
FollowupID: 898346

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 01:45

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 01:45
Michelle - Of course, for those wishing to take your advice and acquire a good DSLR camera, the problem then is trying to figure out what brand and model exactly to buy??

I have been a Sony camera owner (SLT-A55V) for a number of years, but I think I probably need to upgrade to a Canon or Nikon - because these brands still seem to be the most desirable camera amongst the "pros".

A site I have found very good for camera information prior to buying, is DP Review. The site contains great, in-depth, extensive reviews, of nearly every camera made.

DP Review.

Cheers, Ron.

AnswerID: 624826

Follow Up By: Member - Mark (Tamworth NSW) - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 09:19

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 09:19
Ron don't forget Mirrorless Cameras and Sony are the best with those. If I had my time over again I would have bought a Mirrorless camera rather than my Cannon DSLR. I'm now a prisoner to the multiple Cannon lenses I have and can't justify starting again.
Unless you are going to go the whole hog and get a Full Frame DSLR and use it regularly (like a professional?), Mirrorless cameras are as good,. So tell me numerous people I respect, they are a whole lot more versatile due to their size which mans you are more likely to have them with you and lower number of moving parts

A Walkley Award winning professional photographer I know says the best camera is the one you have in your hand. By that he mans no point in having "the best camera" if you don't use it often.
1
FollowupID: 898357

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 10:34

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 10:34
.
Ron,

The Sony SLT-A55V that you have is a good camera. Its ultimate performance will somewhat depend on what lenses you use with it. But moving to a Canon or Nikon DSLR will not necessarily improve your photos.

If you do make a change I suggest that the future lies with mirrorless cameras as Mark has said. I could never understand why the camera industry continued with mirrors when film was displaced by digital sensors. My Nikon D80 was dumped when the Sony RX10 mirrorless became available. With its 24-200mm F 2.8 lens it will handle anything I need. (current model even better)
My RX10 lens is non-interchangeable..... no need to carry extra lenses and simpler with reduced weight.

Sure, professionals may still carry heavy DSLR's but mirrorless is the future standard and many do have interchangeable lenses.
Cheers
Allan

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 898359

Reply By: Baz - The Landy - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 09:19

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 09:19
The choice of camera will largely be dependent on the use you are going to put the images to.

If you are intending to produce high quality books or make poster style advertising material then the choice of camera will be in the professional range with a high price.

These days, many simply look to share photo’s online with family and friends and for this a “standard” type camera will suffice and it doesn’t necessarily need to be an SLR or the like with a hefty pricetag.

After all, many great photographs have been taken on little more than a "box brownie".

Increasingly, Janet (Mrs Landy) and I use our iPhone for those “in the moment” shots, especially as it is usually in our back pockets ready to go, but we always carry a pelican case packed with various lenses, filters and camera bodies – all Nikon.

I think one of the most important things to remember is that whilst getting the “technical” aspects of a photograph correct, it is far (way far) more important to compose the shot. Whenever we take a photograph, regardless of the camera, we try to create a photograph that draws the viewer into it…

After all, a picture paints a thousand words.

No camera will compensate for lack of composition...

But sometimes, a photograph will never be able to capture a scene in the way the human eye can, so there are times we simply put the camera away and take an imprint in our mind. For those travelling this great land of ours don't overlook this - sometimes it is just worth sitting back and enjoying that sunset, rather than trying to capture it in a photograph...

And on another note, it is important to remember that the copyright of photographic images rests with the person who has taken the image. If that is something important to you as a photographer then be wary of posting on the web, and if posting to websites be sure you are aware if you are assigning any rights over the photographs you are publishing.

You can read some more on copyright in my blog…

Copyright - I can use this photograph (Can't I?)

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
“Those who don’t think
it can be done shouldn’t
bother the person doing it…”

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 624829

Follow Up By: Member - johnat - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 12:44

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 12:44
Baz, Your blog entry is very good, but omits one very important matter.
If someone else gets you to take a pic for them, and pays you to do it, the copyright belongs to THEM, not the photographer.
Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in the hospital, dying of nothing.

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 898364

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 13:23

Sunday, Apr 07, 2019 at 13:23
Hi Johnat

Thanks, and yes.

An exception of the copyright law also relates to the press/media, who can use your image providing it is not the focal point of the story.

This is why you will often see images taken from Facebook and the like and used by media outlets...

Cheers, Baz
“Those who don’t think
it can be done shouldn’t
bother the person doing it…”

Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message

1
FollowupID: 898365

Reply By: 9900Eagle - Monday, Apr 08, 2019 at 06:50

Monday, Apr 08, 2019 at 06:50
Friend is a professional photographer and instead of carrying all his heavy camera gear around, he has a FujifilmX-T2 which he swears by, especially it's use in rain and snow.
AnswerID: 624845

Popular Content

Popular Products (15)