15amp to 10 amp

Is it legal to connect 10 amp appliances to a 15 amp caravan site power point?
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Reply By: Glenn C5 - Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 13:14

Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 13:14
I think most of us run a 15 amp lead from the caravan site power point to the caravan and then use 10 amp appliances . eg: toaster , electric kettle. Pretty sure its legal. Although I wouldn't plug it in directly into the 15 amp caravan site power point. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 17:45

Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 17:45
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Hi Glenn,

It is both legal and safe to plug your appliance with its 10A plug directly into a 15A rated Power point. Makes no difference if the appliance is within a caravan, at the end of an extension cord, or directly at the 15A GPO.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Kazza055 - Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 13:33

Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 13:33
Absolutely legal, the 10A male connector will fit into the 15A Socket that has a larger earth pin.

What is not legal is to modify a 15A male plug so the earth pin will go into a smaller 10A socket. Same as it is not legal to put a 10A male plug in place of the original 15A male plug with the larger earth pin.

If you need to run your caravan from a 10A socket you can use a purpose made device like the Ampfibian device here.
AnswerID: 624904

Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 17:41

Friday, Apr 12, 2019 at 17:41
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Yes. Not only is it legal to connect "10A appliances" to a 15A rated power point, it is also entirely safe. It is also legal and safe to connect a 10A rated extension cord to a 15A outlet. Such extension cord must of course have a 10A socket at its other end.

Current regulations allow for a 20A circuit breaker to protect 10A GPO's and there may be a number of GPO's on the one circuit. A 15A rated GPO is also protected by a 20A circuit breaker but only one such GPO is permitted on that circuit. So both 10A and 15A outlets are protected by a 20A breaker.
Cheers
Allan

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AnswerID: 624916

Follow Up By: G.T. - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 11:17

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 11:17
Pardon my ignorance, but what is a GPO?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 12:40

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 12:40
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"GPO" = General Purpose Outlet.
It is the industry name for a 'power point'.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: nickb - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 14:20

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 14:20
It officially called to SO (socket outlet) as referred to in the Australian Standards but 95% of electricians still call it a GPO, as do all draftsmen!!
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 14:34

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 14:34
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Thanks Nick,

That is why I avoided describing it as an "SO" to avoid further muddying the water!
Perhaps henceforth it shall be a 'Socket-Outlet'.
All electrical scholars please take note. lol
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 15:45

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 15:45
I understood a socket outlet to be a socket without a switch used for such things as the in-ceiling power supply for aircons and the like.
But - I'm not a sparkie, so what would I know?
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
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Follow Up By: Kazza055 - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 16:25

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 16:25
Not a Electrician but been in the industry most my life and this is the first time I have seen a GPO referred to as a socket outlet.

A quick google shows that Clipsal use the SO for non outlets without a switch as suggested by Peter_n_Margaret above.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 18:20

Saturday, Apr 13, 2019 at 18:20
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We are getting way off-topic here, but to clarify.......

Once they were "power-points" then "General-purpose Outlets" (GPO's) now they are "Socket Outlets". They may or may not have an integral switch.
Even if a manufactured product having an integral switch (Switched Socket-outlet) is installed it is still simply a Socket Outlet as far as the AS 3000 Wiring Rules are concerned.

Electricians will still refer to the Outlets installed for everyday use as GPO's because they are general purpose. Other outlets installed more out of reach such as for exhaust fans and overhead heaters were known as SPO's (Special Purpose Outlets) but now that term is not used, they are all Socket Outlets.

Whether or not a switch is required at a Socket Outlet is a determined by several factors of function and access.

Cheers
Allan

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