NPS300 engine

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 19:22
ThreadID: 138476 Views:1396 Replies:5 FollowUps:2
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G/Day All, Have been looking at early 2000 model NPS300's & just wondering if any one can shed some light on the following engines in those years (4HE1,4HE1-T,4HE1-XN & 4HG1) any info or experiences good,bad or ugly, which one would be a better choice with regards to reliability & or parts. Any one know if the 4HE1's were all turbo & intercooled or a mix of N/A , turbo, turbo & intercooled ?? still searching the web with not much info apart from wikipedia that says the 4HE1's all had turbos.

Any info on on them would be appreciated.

Cheers,
Pete.
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Reply By: RMD - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 20:19

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 20:19
I would visit the closest Isuzu truck centre and talk to the foreman of the workshop or a mechanic who has been working on them for years. That way you will find out the features, common faults and strengths of each engine you are interested in.
I suspect most of them use the unit injector and High Energy injector actuation of pressured oil to operate the injectors. This is different to CRD systems.
Edit.
It seems from Ron’s post below that Isuzu hasn’t used the unit injectors in these engine. I was unsure as the the exact injection.
AnswerID: 626019

Reply By: PhilD - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 22:35

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 22:35
Had 2000 4HG1 non-turbo engine. She chugged along and reliable as. The biggest issue was the gearing and noise in the cab, as it was doing around 2700 rpm from memory at 95kph, which was about top speed. That was on standard 16” tyres 235 85 16. It needed bigger tyres or the gearing changed. A 6th gear would have helped. Instead, I changed to an Iveco Daily and don’t regret it a bit.
AnswerID: 626027

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 23:32

Wednesday, Jun 05, 2019 at 23:32
FSH00 - The Isuzu nomenclature is reasonably simple, the engine series runs alphabetically.
However, the individual engine model range is mind-boggling and confusing.

So, you have the 4H family of engines, with E being the earlier version, F the next version, and G the version after that.
If the nomenclature has -T in it, it's turbocharged. The -TC series are turbocharged and intercooled.

When the Zexel electronic pump is fitted, it appears X is sometimes used in the model number.
XN denotes turbocharged and intercooled with the Zexel pump.

The power ratings are varied quite a bit, according to model fitment.
The 4x4 models usually get a slight power and torque boost over the 2WD models.
I have outlined some of the engine models specs below. These specs (particularly those related to compression ratio, power and torque), are not "hard and fast".
You need to acquire the particular workshop manual for the vehicle you purchase, to get precise engine specs.

I can find no specs on the 4HE1, this engine and its 6 cylinder brother, the 6HE1 were introduced around 1992 and the 4HE1 doesn't ever appear to have been fitted to the 300 series Isuzu's. But I may be wrong.

Below are some typical Isuzu engine specs. The Isuzu engines are particularly robust, they have no weaknesses or faults worth mentioning.


4HE1-T

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel, turbocharged.
Bore x Stroke: 110 mm x 125 mm
Displacement: 4752 cc
Compression Ratio: 18.5:1
Power: 103 kW @ 2900 RPM
Torque: 363 Nm @ 1800 RPM

Bosch ‘A’ type fuel injection pump with ‘RLD’ all-speed governor.
Quick-start glow plug cold starting aid.

4HE1-TC

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel, turbocharged and intercooled.
Bore x Stroke: 110 mm x 125 mm
Displacement: 4752 cc
Compression Ratio: 17.3:1
Power: 130 kW @ 2700 RPM
Torque: 470 Nm @ 2000 RPM

Bosch ‘A’ type fuel injection pump with ‘RLD’ all-speed governor.
Quick-start glow plug cold starting aid.

4HE1-XN

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, single overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel, turbocharged and intercooled.
Bore x Stroke: 110 mm x 125 mm
Displacement: 4751 cc
Compression Ratio: 17.3:1
Power: 109 kW @ 2800 RPM
Torque: 400 Nm @ 1200-1400 RPM

Zexel MI-TICS mechanically integrated in-line injection pump, with Bosch 4 hole injectors

4HF1

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel.
Bore x Stroke: 112 mm x 110 mm
Displacement: 4334 cc
Compression Ratio: 19.0:1
Power: 85 kW @ 3200 RPM
Torque: 285 Nm @ 1800 RPM

Bosch ‘A’ type fuel injection pump with ‘RLD’ all-speed governor.
Quick-start glow plug cold starting aid.

4HF1-II

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel.
Bore x Stroke: 112 mm x 110 mm
Displacement: 4334 cc
Compression Ratio: 19.0:1
Power: 76 kW @ 3000 RPM
Torque: 242 Nm @ 2000 RPM

Zexel MI-TICS mechanically integrated in-line injection pump, with Bosch 4 hole injectors

4HG1

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel.
Bore x Stroke: 115 mm x 110 mm
Displacement: 4570 cc
Compression Ratio: 19.0:1
Power: 85 kW @ 3200 RPM
Torque: 291 Nm @ 1600 RPM

Bosch ‘A’ type fuel injection pump with ‘RLD’ all-speed governor.
Quick-start glow plug cold starting aid.

4HG1

Type: 4 cylinder, 4 stroke, overhead camshaft, direct injection diesel.
Bore x Stroke: 115 mm x 110 mm
Displacement: 4570 cc
Compression Ratio: 19.0:1
Power: 85 kW @ 3200 RPM
Torque: 291 Nm @ 1600 RPM

Zexel MI-TICS mechanically integrated in-line injection pump, with Bosch 4 hole injectors


All of the earlier Isuzu engines are fitted with the Bosch mechanical injection (up until the late 1990's).
With the advent of tighter emissions regulations from the late 1990's, Isuzu started to fit the Zexel electronic injection pump.
So you can have some of the engines above fitted with Bosch mechanical injection, or Zexel electronic injection, depending on the year of production.

The MI-TICS on the Zexel pump stands for Mechanical Injection, and Timing and Injection rate Control System.
The Zexel pump is a modified Bosch-style in-line injection pump with electronics added, that control the quantity and timing of the injection process, and which electronics also contain self-diagnostic and backup abilities.

The 4HK1-series engines from 2008 onwards are fitted with fully electronic, common-rail fuel injection.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 626028

Reply By: Member - FSH00 - Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 09:51

Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 09:51
Thank you all for your input it is much appreciated.

Ron n, I don't know where you found that info but certainly glad you did, that is exactly the info I was looking for, thanks for the reply.

Pete.
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AnswerID: 626030

Follow Up By: Ron N - Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 10:37

Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 10:37
Pete, if you saw my 4, double-door cabinets, chock-full full of technical literature, workshop manuals, parts manuals, spec sheets, sales literature, and historical publications - some going back to the 1920's - you might get some idea of the vast array of information available to me!
I save tech and advertising stuff that people normally throw out! A lot of irreplaceable information goes into rubbish bins.

My best "win" was saving a huge amount of Caterpillar information from when Wigmore Tractors closed down their country branches in W.A.
Wigmores gave instructions that everything in their country offices was to be dumped (this was when Wigmores was under Alan Bond's control, of course).

Out of the rubbish tip save from the Katanning branch, I scored nearly 1,000 Caterpillar manuals on microfiche, along with a substantial amount of other fiche, including the Numerical Parts Reference for Caterpillar parts, going back to before WW2.
This tech info is priceless for us old restorers, and machinery heritage blokes.

The Japanese have a policy of destroying everything related to a model, 40 years after it's release.
At the 40 year point, the factory destroys all the blueprints, sends all the New Old Stock parts in the factory warehouse to the tip, and destroys all parts books and manuals held by the factory and dealers.

I have mates with mid-1970's Toyota Dyna trucks, you cannot buy anything original from Toyota for these trucks, and they have no information on them, because it has all been destroyed.
If you're lucky, you can occasionally find some NOS parts hidden somewhere, and a few manuals are still in existence in private hands.

After 20 years, parts become difficult to source for Japanese vehicles - trim and plastic and rubberised components are the first to be de-stocked - then you start to find a lot of mechanical parts you want, become "ex-Japan" (factory warehouse) - i.e., no longer stocked by dealers or the Australian parts warehouse.

It pays to be very aware of the fact that obsolescence is built in to Japanese products - and it doesn't pay to own old Japanese-built vehicles, if you need to run them every day, and you need prompt parts supply.

I own a 1989 5 tonne FSR12 (FSR500) Isuzu, it's a great old truck, fitted with 6BG1 engine with 6 speed gearbox.
I rebuilt it from an auction salvage wreck - but I don't need to use it every day, and I'm fully aware it's totally obsolete in most truck owners eyes (and Isuzu's view) - but it still performs beautifully, does all I want it to do - but I have to scrounge around for some parts for it, in todays world.
Luckily, there are plenty of aftermarket suppliers for Isuzu, so there's still a reasonable supply of parts at this stage, for the 1980's Isuzu's.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 899677

Follow Up By: Member - FSH00 - Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 16:44

Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 16:44
I'm glad to see there are people around like your self that have the insight to realize that information like that will still be a valuable tool for some one in the future, I hate seeing stuff like that thrown away my self, I all ways encourage my young lad (apprentice motor mechanic) to collect the useful gear they throw away as one day he or a mate might just need it when it's no longer available.

Thanks again for your time to look the info up & post it.
Pete.
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Reply By: duck - Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 10:26

Thursday, Jun 06, 2019 at 10:26
I've had several as work trucks over the years & the earlier ones do like to drink & if you fit the larger wheels they are gut less & drink heaps more
Remember to change to the springs & fit super singles etc or you will feel the painted lines on the road & all the other problems you get with duals on the ass

My present camper is a NPS300 4x4 but the 5.2ltr 2014model & is so much more economical & more power & has just finished a quick lap of oz
AnswerID: 626031

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