Camp fires

Submitted: Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 12:05
ThreadID: 138686 Views:1662 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
Like most people we love nothing better than sitting by the camp fire in the evening. We keep our fire modest as there is only the two of us and fire wood is a precious commodity.

I am alway gob smacked by the way some people waste fire wood. You see some huge fires out and about and the people then have to sit a number of meters away from them. Why do they do that? Just because there might be an abundant of wood at that particular spot at that time, to me its just wasteful. Not only are we all burning little creatures habitats, but in many places it is getting harder and harder to find any wood at all.

Cheryl

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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 13:41

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 13:41
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Cheryl, you may be well advised to not chide those who have unnecessarily large campfires. There are certain egos at play! If they are of the type who NEED telling then they are of the type who would not accept being told, possibly aggressively so.

Agreed that firewood is a scarce commodity in most camping areas and conservation should be observed by all campers.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 20:41

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 20:41
A fire that might be adequate for 2, may not be suitable for a group of 10 or 15 to cook on & keep warm.
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:02

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:02
Agree 100%, though a larger group may need a larger fire.

Another thing I just don't understand is the creation of a fire scar just metres away from an existing one. Done often enough (and it is done often enough) it just messes up the campground. Many campgrounds now specify "No ground fires".

We find that a fire in a fire bucket made out of an old 9kg gas bottle and stood off the ground is perfectly adequate for a comfort fire and most over-the-fire type of cooking. Not so good for a camp oven, admittedly, but great for most other occasions. It uses less wood and doesn't leave a scar, or even scorch the grass. It packs up into a milk crate.

Nothing new in the pics below but posted FYI.


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Follow Up By: Member - rocco2010 - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:08

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:08
Agree about fire scars.

Was at Niagara Dam in the WA Goldfields a few weeks ago and it would seem every new camper in last few months had his own fire.





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Reply By: pmk03 - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:25

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 14:25
If we are going to have a ground campfire we usually reuse another "scar"
More recently we have started using a flat pack fire pit. Takes up little room when not using it & when set up keeps the fire off the ground.
Have always tried to only have a fire as small as possible. Had some Aboriginal workmates while I was living in Darwin back in the 80's that used to call a large fire a "Whitemans Fire" lol
With a big fire you have to move further away, We just sit closer to a small fire.
As said there's probably a few ego's involved in having a large fire.....
Cheers
Paul
AnswerID: 626640

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 15:07

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 15:07
Yes, I had a flatpack firepit too, but though compact it was heavy, much heavier than my firebucket.

The firebucket seemingly takes up a lot of space in my canopy, but actually it doesn't. The milk crate was always in there as a second step to go onto my tyre step to help me reach stuff on the roof. It also doubled up to carry some other stuff. I just relocated the other stuff and dedicated the crate to the firebucket. It still doubles up as a wheel step booster.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: pmk03 - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 15:24

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 15:24
Always good to have a couple of uses for things you carry.
Yeah the weight of the flat pack was a concern, think ours is 18kg but the space saving in our case was important. Still fits within our weight limits as we tend to travel light.
Cheers
Paul
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Follow Up By: Gronk - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 21:47

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 21:47
Flat pack or ex gas bottle....found them all too heavy and bulky, so bought a "dish" off ebay a few yrs ago....with folding legs weighs approx 1/2 a kilo and comes with a bag, so we store it in the back of the 4wd.https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiEqbbT4afjAhXy7XMBHVyKBpwQMwiiAigmMCY&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.mytopia.com.au%2F22-outdoor-fire-pit-bbq-portable-camping-fireplace-heater-patio-garden-grill%2F&psig=AOvVaw1txqC-Y6pMl4w9IrNQCWFR&ust=1562759154917043&ictx=3&uact=3
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Reply By: Cheryl & Ian (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 17:02

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 17:02
I think you are right regarding egos Allan and I your friends Paul with their whiteman’s fire sounds about right too.

We also have a flat pack fire pit which gets a good work out. Your comment Frank about more and more camp areas requiring fires to be off the ground reminded me of a couple of nitwit young blocks at a coastal camping reserve a couple of years ago. They turned up after dark (probably so they didn’t have to pay the patrolling ranger), and despite large signs at the entrance saying no fires on the ground, they picked the nicest grass area and proceeded to clear/chop up a large circular area with their tomahawk only to then light a large fire. Arrrhh, I so wanted to point out the sign to them, but thought better of it.

Cheers, Cheryl

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 20:38

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 20:38
It surprises me that they didn’t burn the sign, it must have been steel!
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Follow Up By: Gronk - Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 21:41

Tuesday, Jul 09, 2019 at 21:41
We turned up to a roadside camp spot once that had a no campfire sign.....but it was cold, so we cut a nice square of turf out of the ground, had a nice small fire until bedtime, then next morning reinstated the turf and walked it in. With the charcoal under it, probably grew greener than the rest of the paddock !!
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 14:35

Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 14:35
Why would you ignore the sign?
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Follow Up By: Gronk - Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 17:56

Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 17:56
Because it was cold....and I felt like a rebel !!
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Reply By: Kilcowera Station Stay - Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 10:16

Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 10:16
Oh yes we agree, keep the fire small please! You're not wasting wood. We supply firewood to our visitors as part of their camping fee and it's a big job to cut a trailer load of wood a couple of times a week. We also clean the fireplaces out at the end of our visitors stay and that way most people use the same fireplace thank goodness. We also ask that people leave the fire to burn out rather than put it out with water or bury it. It's much easier to clean out. And for God's sake don't burn all manner of rubbish in it that's not going to burn anyway - tins, alfoil etc. Cheers Toni
Kilcowera Station Stay

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Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 15:48

Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 15:48
I think fires burn out quicker left uncovered, when they are buried they quite often smoulder for ages, like a shut down wood heater.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 10:56

Wednesday, Jul 10, 2019 at 10:56
Agree Cheryl, although I'll put my hand up and acknowledge that many many many (cut with the many!) moons ago a group of us ended up with what was almost a bonfire one night on theOodnadatta track. Older, better educated and hopefully a bit wiser now (debatable) I'm surprised at the waste of resources and the size of some fires, although have to say they are in the minority these days.

Most amazing thing I saw recently was a retired bloke at a caves campground whose fire was initially throwing flames 3m high. The irony was that he was camped closest to the bush. I'm firmly in the camp of using what wood you need for cooking and enjoyment and leaving some for others, although I've seen plenty who just pile it on because they're moving on early the next day.

Something strangely comforting about gazing at glowing coals in a fire.
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Follow Up By: nick g1 - Saturday, Jul 13, 2019 at 13:46

Saturday, Jul 13, 2019 at 13:46
Yes bush tv!
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