2 inch lift tyres?

Submitted: Friday, Aug 02, 2019 at 22:11
ThreadID: 138865 Views:1259 Replies:6 FollowUps:11
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Hi all

Just got a 2 inch lift on my triton. How big tyres do u think i can go?
And im thinking ill go mud terrain.

Currently sitting on 30 inch tyres
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Aug 02, 2019 at 22:16

Friday, Aug 02, 2019 at 22:16
If you want to be legal, ask your state rego authority.
AnswerID: 626993

Reply By: Hoyks - Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 07:50

Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 07:50
I've only ever had 30's and I can safely say that I have only got stuck once in a situation where bigger tyres would have helped.

I was bellied out on the hump between some muddy ruts that were chewed out by guys running 35-40" mud tyres and there was no way tyres that big would fit under the vehicle anyway.

Bigger tyres cost more, take more fuel to turn to turn, put more stress on the drive line, don't do your low range gearing any favours and make bugger all difference to ground clearance.

You might get away with 31's, but much bigger they will probably start rubbing in the wheel arches, particularly when the suspension is compressed and you're turning.

The National Code Of Practice says:
"*4WD goodsvehiclesand their 2WD equivalents if the chassis and running gear are essentially the same as the 4WD version (N ADR category);
or
*any medium weight goodsvehicle (NA2, NB ADR category).

Must not be more than 50mm larger or 26mm smaller than that of any tyre designated by the vehicle manufacturer for that vehicle."

So, in summary, 50mm diameter larger (which will give you 25mm more ground clearance, until you let the air out of it to improve traction), but that is based on the tyre placard, not what is actually fitted to the vehicle now.

Punch the data into this tyre size calculator and it will tell you want sizes you can look at, but won't tell you if its going to rub on the body.
AnswerID: 626995

Follow Up By: Damian G1 - Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 08:10

Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 08:10
Thanks for all the info mate

I ride my kawasaki to wor everyday so not really concerned about fuel consumpsion..and i have IFS suspension so i guess it wouldnt compress as much would it?
Im happy with my.new suspension but i just wana get my diff off the ground a little. I think you might be right though, even my bullbar looks like itl restrict bigger tyres - theres only about 5cm gap there
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FollowupID: 900952

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:54

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:54
"Bigger tyres cost more, take more fuel to turn to turn, put more stress on the drive line, don't do your low range gearing any favours and make bugger all difference to ground clearance."
Agree, although tyre cost is often more related to popularity.
This is a good summary:Fitting-bigger-tyres-to-your-4WD
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FollowupID: 900994

Reply By: Michael H9 - Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 08:40

Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 08:40
By law in most states, you can only give a car a total lift of 75mm Your car already has 50mm. This means that you can go 50mm more in tyre diameter which gives another 25mm lift. The starting point is the largest tyre size listed on the tyre placard on the car. You can't go past 50mm larger than that in most states. I think a Triton tyre placard lists the size as 245/70/16 which is a 29.5" tyre so 31.5". That's around a 265/70/16. 20mm is the largest you can increase the width I think? If you're in NSW it's not a 50mm increase, it's a 7% increase in diameter that's allowed provided the total lift isn't over 75mm. All this is dependent on the tyre not scrubbing. I've found that if you stay legal the tyre rarely scrubs. Stay legal for insurance purposes, plus large tyres will break your car because they put extra strain on the drive line, especially if they're spinning in the air and drop on a rock or tree root. There are a lot of illegal cars on the road.
AnswerID: 626996

Reply By: Alloy c/t - Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 09:43

Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 09:43
The maximum 'lift' has now been ratified [without engineering cert] to 70mm overall , ergo you have put in a 50mm lift which allows you legally another 20mm in tire size [ that does NOT mean you insurance allows it ] Your normal size is a 245 so you 'could' go to a 265..BUT you may have clearance problems requiring some minor body 'chop'.... you gain 10mm under the diffs ... is it 'worth it'.. ?
AnswerID: 626997

Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 12:53

Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 12:53
What state dropped back from 75mm to 70mm ?
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FollowupID: 900960

Reply By: Blown4by - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 23:12

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 23:12
"Bigger tyres cost more, take more fuel to turn to turn, put more stress on the drive line, don't do your low range gearing any favours and make bugger all difference to ground clearance."
All true plus one more important consideration: Bigger diameter tyres decreases braking efficiency meaning that the vehicle will be harder to stop. Also you will need to adjust your speedo gearing/calibration for it to remain accurate.
Unless you are doing a lot of mud work you are wasting your money fitting 'muddies' as they wear faster than A/T tyres. Also with your suspension lift the correct wheel alignment may be harder to maintain leading to irregular wear patterns, scalloping, etc
AnswerID: 627074

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 10:07

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 10:07
All true bar 1 ... speedo calibration , every Toyota on factory tires reads 4 klm an hour under unless said speedo is GPS enabled , a slight increase in tire size actually gives a 'true' speed as verified by aftermarket GPS , the extra 'fuel' is a fallacy [to a point] as the odometer reading is 'out' 4klm per 100klm .....as per GPS.
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FollowupID: 901043

Follow Up By: RMD - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:27

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:27
Alloy c/t

I agree Toyota's might have 4km under on speedo, but this is a Mitsubishi, it may have less override and bigger tyres of unkown percentage increase cause $$$$$$ to be paid to the man.
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FollowupID: 901047

Follow Up By: Blown4by - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 12:36

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 12:36
Alloy c/t
The speedo calibration has nothing to do with fuel consumption. It is the 'actual' distance traveled divided by the 'actual' litres used to give Km/l. As a matter of interest if you multiply the Km/l result by 2.8247358 the result = MPG.
Bigger tyres will, as a general rule, use more fuel because they are heavier, if larger rims are required they will be heavier too and if the tyres are wider they have to push more air out of the way at highway speeds and more dirt out of the way in heavy going = more fuel (although they may not sink as far) There may be a slight gain under certain conditions depending on, speed, wind resistance, terrain type but generally speaking taller gearing requires more throttle to maintain a given speed when under load.
As we don't know the tyre size Damian will finish up with its all a bit academic.
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FollowupID: 901049

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 13:14

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 13:14
Blown 4by ,,, wrong wrong wrong , when you use the Odometer for your consumption figures after a tire size increase you Odometer it now reading 4% LESS ....a True 100 km distance by GPS now only reads 96 km on the vehicle Odometer therefore so calculations for ltr per 100 or MPG need to be adjusted by 4% ...an Odometer works of each revolution of the tire = distance travelled , a larger tire circumference uses less revolutions to travel the same distance ...an increase from a tire 265 to an 285 equals 4 kilometres in 100 km. ..The SPEEDO reads 4km 'more' ...the Odometer 4% less ....
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FollowupID: 901052

Follow Up By: Blown4by - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 14:41

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 14:41
Alloy c/t: If you read my Follow Up instead of just 'jumping in' you would see that I said: "the ACTUAL distance traveled divided by the ACTUAL litres = fuel consumption in Km/l." Nowhere did I mention using the Odometer to ascertain the ACTUAL distance traveled. As you have stated there are other ways to measure distance traveled such as a GPS. You could also use Google Maps, distance posted on road signs and on paper maps, a trip computer linked to the car GPS, etc.
You could still use an odometer reading uncalibrated following a tyre size change by simply factoring in the percentage variation to calculate the ACTUAL distance traveled in lieu of that indicated on the odometer.
Do you have any comment re fuel consumption with larger tyres?
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FollowupID: 901053

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 14:52

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 14:52
People are forever suggesting that 'fuel consumption' increases due to a tire size increase , the facts are that people are NOT doing the adjustment in their calculations to give the true figures , when your Odo reading is 4% 'out of whack' so are your fuel consumption figures ....simple as that .
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FollowupID: 901054

Follow Up By: Hoyks - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 17:29

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 17:29
A bigger tyre is a heavier tyre and it takes more energy to turn it.
A mud tyre has a greater rolling resistance than a road tyre.

I went from the standard tyres to a ever so slightly larger and more aggressive all terrain and got 1L more consumption per 100km.

A tad more than 4%.
Also keep in mind he is talking mud tyres.

Always good to site references too:
https://www.performanceplustire.com/blog/do-larger-tires-get-better-gas-mileage/
https://www.oponeo.co.uk/tyre-article/the-role-of-tyres-in-fuel-economy
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FollowupID: 901055

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:43

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:43
I went up a few tyre sizes, around a 7% increase in diameter and what do you know, my fuel usage increased by around 7% too. Also, my odometre started reading around 7% short when checked on the freeway 5km check sections. Heavier tyres may take a little extra energy to get going but they maintain momentum better at other times to compensate. Different tread types will have an effect. Then there's the effect on gearing as well. My opinion is that there is an increase with larger tyres but not as much as is measured by the out of calibration instruments caused by the tyre size increase.
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FollowupID: 901057

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