Cracked Diff housing just outside the Hangers 2016 D Max

Submitted: Saturday, Aug 03, 2019 at 23:57
ThreadID: 138871 Views:2922 Replies:13 FollowUps:32
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Hello All, have a 2015 D Max and have cracked the diff housing rear axle both sides just outside the hangers. Vehicle has done 70K km. Has done the majority of the Len Beadell roads etc but come unstuck on the Gibb.

Was wondering if anyone knows if there has been any reports to this happening to other D Max vehicles or whether i can consider a once off.
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Reply By: RMD - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 08:58

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 08:58
Tezza
I have not heard of it before but will ask some questions to find out why.
Does the axle to bump rubber clearance have at least 70mm or more when loaded?
Is the std suspension still in the vehicle or is it upgraded, ie, has enough height and ability to absorb road undulations and therefore enough travel before bottoming?
Have the bump rubbers been often touching their stops? if so the sudden halt to suspension travel has caused undue stress on the axle tubes.
Do you have wider wheel track?
Are the original, useless, non performing shock absorbers still fitted?
All good reasons why it may have happened.
If very heavily loaded then all forces will be far more than same load on a freeway.
AnswerID: 627024

Follow Up By: Tezza4567 - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:55

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:55
The vehicle has had a GVM upgrade and is fiited with ARB old man emu suspension. Is an extra cab with box on the back (vehicle is in my profile pic). In regards to weight, with the big trips we do we are maxed out and generally we utilise the public weighbridge to ensure the GVM is not exceeded.
Tyres are standard 265 70 R17 with original rims.
Tyre pressure was reduced to 28psi.
Gut feel then is a combination of weight, tyre pressure and corrugation / speed.

Just asking the question to see if there was anything inherently wrong with the vehicle model that i did not know about.
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FollowupID: 900990

Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:11

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:11
GVM increase with standard running gear wonder why they only done half of the job axel and brakes should be included as well maybe even chassis strengthening drive shaft etc. It's an expensive mistake to make getting amatures without engineering what is required first.

Unfortunately lots of people are subject to getting caught out by these off the shelf cheap upgrades.
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FollowupID: 900991

Follow Up By: RMD - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 12:44

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 12:44
Tezza.
If you wash the area to see the extent of cracking on both sides and then have the cracks welded and a strengthening web welded above and the 1/3 circle tube plating underneath welded to near the back plate and extending inward to, past and inward, of the spring hanger/ U Bolt points it will provide much greater integrity for a heavy load. No welds around the circumference of the tube, only along the tube. You may have to bend/ reform the lower sides of then U bolts to cater for any additional thickness of the underside strengthening tube.
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FollowupID: 901050

Reply By: Member - wicket - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:32

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:32
Would jacking the vehicle up on the diff pumpkin when loaded ie to change tyres cause undue stress ?
AnswerID: 627026

Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:44

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:44
The cracks are on the outside of the spring pads, not the inside. Anyone who jacks up a vehicle via the diff housing should be nail gunned to the garage wall or similar punitive treatment.
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FollowupID: 900979

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:18

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:18
Don't know if it's still the case but Toyota used to show the diff as a rear jacking point on the Prado.
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FollowupID: 900985

Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:19

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:19
Opps been doing it since 1985 without issues and always placed axel stands under there as well to support the weight when working on vehicles what can happen doing this that we need to be wary of thanks.

Also most mechanics and tyre oulets use trolly jacks under diffs

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FollowupID: 900986

Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:27

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:27
Guess it depends on the situation/jack etc Batt's. At home with a trolley jack and stands is very different to out bush with a skinny topped windup/hydraulic. Is there also an issue of strength/stress involved with a trolley jack on the diff for a minute or two?
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FollowupID: 900987

Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:48

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 13:48
Like to see someone change a tyre on a 4wd using a bottle jack off the chassis or body safely anywhere. Not sure the time factor would play any part had vehicles on stands for weeks .

If you check a vehicle manual for a solid axel jacking position you may find some or maybe all manufacturers disagrees with RMD I wonder why that is ? Not sure where he got his info from or if it's his own idea he come up with.
The GQ patrol manual has pics to show the jacking position under the axel.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:17

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:17
Think he was talking specifically diff, not axle housing, which is often a recommended jack point along with chassis rails. I've jacked on the diff (with trolley and stands) many times when I wanted to rotate wheels. Jack and diff are only weight-bearing for a minute or two while I position the stands but his comment did get me thinking.
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FollowupID: 900992

Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 18:14

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 18:14
While it may seem ok, there are two common differential housings, Banjo and Salisbury. The Banjo is a steel unit construction which is integrally welded with the axle tubes. The Salisbury however, has two tubes jammed into a cast differential housing and plug welded in a couple of spots. If you wish to SEE & OBSERVE what the axle housing does by jacking under the differential, place a straight edge across from spring to spring and Mark a line above it in the centre on the diff housing. Now with your over GVM load above, simply jack up under the differential and see what moves. The stress on both axle types is high and is possibly the reason why some Salisbury types have broken welds at the tube entry to the cast housing. I wonder why???????? Still want to jack it up under the diff? I might in an emergency but not as a matter of normality.

EDIT . If you unnoticeably bend the rear axle housing by jacking a loaded vehicle under the diff and BEND IT, you now have the centre line of outer bearings and diff action not in line anymore. That then !Dan's due to the off centre of the drive axles, they will then fatigue and break the splined end off the drive axle OR the outer end will fatigue and fracture. Very similar to running a LandCruiser with loose rear bearings. The axle breaks off the stud flange. Still want to jack up under the diff?
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Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:40

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:40
I have Salisbury diffs in the front and rear of my 4wd and always jack under the diffs when needed and never had an issue.
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FollowupID: 901033

Follow Up By: Batt's - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 22:24

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 22:24
Think I'll stick to what the vehicle manufacturer recommends which is what I have been doing for the past 34yrs regardless of the load. Still I wonder how you jack a 4wd up to change a tyre or pack the wheels if your hung up on a rock etc in the real world.

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FollowupID: 901036

Follow Up By: RMD - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:14

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:14
Batts
Jacking up under the axle tube is what you would normally do, that is what you do isn't it? That is normal and ok. Just jacking centrally under the diff with the centre of the axle subjected to a heavily loaded vehicle is a bit unwise. You wouldn't be jacking up the vehicle out in the bush or when bogged by placing the jack under the diff anyway.
I don't jack under diffs because with a Nissan station wagon I towed a ute on a tandem. The heavy load on wheels made the axle diff centre area bent and lower than the wheel bearings. Result, Negative camber on both back wheels. That was only because of the leverage effect of the wheel around the leaf spring on both sides. If jacked in the middle under diff, the forces to bend the axle tubes at the either side of the salisbury diff would be greatly increased, principle of levers applies there. I straightened it by tying down the axle tube ends and jacking under the Salisbury diff.
When a banjo diff is bent it is hardly noticeable as the bend is not localized as with a Salisbury. Just because people have not had problems or haven't noticed anything doesn't mean it isn't present. They simply find later the spline end or the flange end breaks off and then don't relate it to a bent housing or axle tubes. One thing I had to do during my apprenticeship was make half moon discs which fitted into the bearing area of Salisbury diffs and centred plugs at the wheel bearing ends. Either a visual or tight wire was used to then check all centres were in line. If not, the axle then had to be pressed to make them in line. Nice job to do.
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FollowupID: 901046

Follow Up By: Batt's - Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:53

Thursday, Aug 08, 2019 at 19:53
Trolley jack under the diff centre if it allows the vehicle to raise up evenly or tubes if not and bottle jack just under tube.
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FollowupID: 901103

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:56

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 09:56
Tezza - Nearly all axle housings crack because of overloading, speeding with an overload, and speeding with an overload on rough roads.

I've seen no rear D-Max axle housings cracked, and very few 4WD axle housings cracked in the last 30 years.

However, the earlier D-Max rear axle housing, is not as heavy as the current D-Max rear axle housing

Most axle housings that show up cracked or bent, are front housings that have endured too many "Dukes of Hazzard" jumps, with the attendant hard landing.

The earlier D-Max rear axle housings are rated at 1680kgs gross rear axle loading.

The latest model D-Max (2017-on) has a heavier rear axle, rated at 1870kgs, with two more bolts holding the diff carrier sections together as well.

I'd suggest you hunt around for a current model D-Max that is being wrecked and try to acquire the later model, heavier axle housing from it, to fit to your rig.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 627028

Follow Up By: Batt's - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 17:58

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 17:58
I wonder if the axel rating is reduced when off road like tow bar ratings are because of the extra stress on them.
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FollowupID: 901004

Follow Up By: Ron N - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 22:14

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 22:14
Batts - Almost certainly the case. The military reduce off-road axle loadings to 50% of on-highway loadings - and for good reason.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 901010

Reply By: Ron N - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 12:15

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 12:15
Who's old enough to remember these warning plates?! They were introduced, due to the propensity of vehicle owners, to completely ignore load ratings!

They started off being fitted to the dashboard of every commercial vehicle in the 1920's, then made their way to the firewall in the engine bay, by WW2.

They were still in use in the 1970's, and I think they only died out in the 1980's.

I've never forgotten the ad in the copy of the 1936 Kalgoorlie Miner, that we found under an old prospectors hut that we demolished in the early 1980's.

The ad read; "For Sale - 1935 model, 1 ton Chevrolet utility, will carry 2 tons" .. !!

Little wonder, most vintage restorers have to deal with bent axle housings, twisted chassis', and broken springs, in their restoration efforts!

Cheers, Ron.





AnswerID: 627030

Reply By: Tezza4567 - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:08

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:08
Thanks ron, appeciate the feedback. We are careful when we load and are mindful of the dangers in being overweight. Gvm upgrade to 3250, public weighbridge used before we setout and steady as you go. The vehicle has done a hard 70k, been accross the simspon twice, majority if the beadell tracks, bins track sandy blight anne beadell TAR and a few others.
My gues is that its a cumulative effect from previous trips, corrugations , weight, tyre pressure 28psi.
AnswerID: 627033

Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 16:28

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 16:28
Tezza

You may be very aware of load, but in no way does a GVM upgrade do anything but provide MORE weight onto the rear axle than the vehicle was designed to tolerate. Yes hard running will have had an effect but you haven't supplied any info about the situation of ride height and running chassis to axle safety clearance or shock absorbers. If others under similar weight have survived and your ride height clearances are reduced there would be a higher risk of breakages especially if the suspension closes up to the max at regular intervals with a heavy load.
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FollowupID: 901000

Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 00:08

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 00:08
Tezza - "GVM upgrade to 3250". There's your problem, right there.

The current Hi Ride D-Max is rated at 3050kg maximum GVM - and as far as I understand, all the "GVM upgrades" are merely heavier springs and shocks - which makes even the current model D-Max overloaded with a 3250kg GVM upgrade - which exceeds the manufacturers maximum permissible total load rating.

As your D-Max is the earlier model with the lighter capacity rear axle, it appears your original maximum GVM would have been 190kg less than the current model, making your original factory GVM, 2860kg.

I fail to understand how your "GVM upgrade" supplier could rate your vehicle to 3250kg, when there is no way Isuzu would approve this level of weight-carrying.

Any engineering operation worth their salt, that is providing GVM upgrades, should be reinforcing the rear axle housing with trusses, to enable the housing to withstand the greater weight - and never exceeding the manufacturers recommended maximum GVM.

Interestingly, the D-Max GVM is not the capacity of the axles added together.

The front axle of the current D-Max is rated at 1350kg, and the rear is rated at 1870kg. Added together, this would make 3220kg.

But Isuzu say the maximum GVM is 3050kg - so it's very obvious it's a mistake to add front and rear axle ratings together to come up with the GVM.

A little more research shows you're actually not alone. Scroll down the following article to the comments, and find the one by Darryl Cross - who has had a D-Max housing fracture after a GVM upgrade - and Isuzu will not even look at his problem.

He provides a contact number if you wish to discuss the problem with him.

D-Max gets a GVM upgrade

What is a little concerning is the comments at the bottom of the article by Aaron Schubert (who wrote the article about his D-Max upgrade) - that Lovells and Pedders are "upgrading" the D-Max front and rear axles with their GVM upgrade kits.

I'd be interested to know how these two companies can offer "upgraded" front and rear axles, that produces a result, that exceeds the manufacturers maximum GVM - without factory permission - which Isuzu will obviously, NOT give to anyone.

A local engineers report approving the GVM upgrade to a level exceeding the manufacturers maximum GVM, is totally and utterly worthless, without factory approval.

MY18 Isuzu D-Max - full specifications

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 901012

Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 08:52

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 08:52
I am unaware of any GVM upgrade mobs who change the front ball joints to a larger unit to cater for over maximum GVM stated by the maker. Are the front wheel bearings also upgraded somehow?
Same for rear axles, apart from the strength of the axle tube which is the limiting factor here, the bearings are not changed for larger capacity loads either.
At Factory GVM and beyond, ie, supposedly upgraded, the axle tube has to be flexing more than the factory rating causes, ie, causing material compression at the site. I hazard a guess the cracks are just along the spring pad welds where sudden section change is present. The MIG welds may also be slightly undercut into the axle tube surface which WILL definitely cause localized stress and cracking if excessive flex is present.
If nothing is out of alignment, have the cracks welded, Isuzu welded onto the tube too, and also have support webs/gussets welded to the area, plus a long 1/4 arc tubular section welded from near the wheel bearings to half way to the diff. That will provide increased strength and reduce flex with minimal weight addition. You may not have to change the axle assembly at all.
If the vertical plane of both rear wheels is not parallel, best to check that accurately, then either bending to straight before repair or axle housing replacement is needed.
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FollowupID: 901015

Reply By: Bazooka - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:27

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:27
Found this Tezza: Cracked axle housing
Read p9 also wrt Mazda V DMax
Seems Ron's comment about Isuzu strengthening axles from 2017 might have been a result of some customer experience?
AnswerID: 627034

Follow Up By: Tezza4567 - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:50

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 14:50
Thanks Bazooka, interesting read..........
Definitely some key learnings from this
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FollowupID: 900993

Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 18:02

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 18:02
I'll answering the question from actual personal not google or my mates mates experience . I have owned four Isuzu based vehicles, a 2008 Rodeo single cab, a 2010 Colarado and a 2014 D-Max twin cab and a current 2019 D-Max single cab. All vehicles are work and recreational vehicles and all run pretty much on their GVM's at all times , Each vehicle has done some of the remotest tracks in Australia including the Anne Beadell twice, the Gary and part of The Gunbarrel and I have never broken anything.
AnswerID: 627040

Reply By: Gerard S - Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 20:19

Sunday, Aug 04, 2019 at 20:19
Should have bought a Ranger lol
AnswerID: 627046

Reply By: The Explorer - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 20:31

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 20:31
Similar failure reported on CSR facebook page by PB recently...



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Greg
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AnswerID: 627070

Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:19

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:19
Oh look. Airbags!
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FollowupID: 901031

Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:52

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:52
RHS wheel? Tank and missing wheel shows it is the LHS. Those airbags don't have a large bump rubber, if any, built in, and so any closure of suspension will cause immense sudden stress onto the axle/s, beyond their limit with a heavily laden vehicle.
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FollowupID: 901035

Follow Up By: Mick O - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 00:40

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 00:40
Note the important words...."heavily laden vehicle"

Overloading....the root of all evil! (and I should know because I'm an expert at it!)

Mind you I do try and toughen the diff housing these days. This was the very first 79 series diff extension prototype that Multidrive Technologies ever did. For what ever reason, strengthening of the diff was neglected. This has since been replaced with the current Multidrive billet axle and custom strengthened rear diff housing...no issues!)

My thinking back at that time with a crack right around the housing just inside the mounting plate was "Thank god for Robin Matthews" :-)





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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Aug 19, 2019 at 14:33

Monday, Aug 19, 2019 at 14:33
We were having a feed at well 9 few weeks back, when the Dmax was carted past our group with LHS rear wheel missing.

Didn't take a lot of notice as we were having an issue with one of the canopies mounts. Just assumed it was a Triton until corrected by a companion.

Bob
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Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Hoyks - Sunday, Aug 25, 2019 at 10:55

Sunday, Aug 25, 2019 at 10:55
Here is the video from the crew that were traveling with it.
https://youtu.be/Q8G7WDB9QZM
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FollowupID: 901397

Reply By: The Explorer - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 20:37

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 20:37
Crikey - here's another Izuzu from CSR this year...



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Greg
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Follow Up By: IvanTheTerrible - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:30

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:30
That spring pack is a lot thicker than standard. Looks like a GVM upgrade spring but the ute doesn't look that heavy. Unless all the excess baggage was removed to put it on the trailer. Be interested in the story. Was he towing?
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FollowupID: 901032

Follow Up By: The Explorer - Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:51

Monday, Aug 05, 2019 at 21:51
Dont know if they were towing but guessing not.
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Follow Up By: axle - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 10:42

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 10:42
Think I might buy a old VW beetle, might take all year to get there..BUT!!.

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FollowupID: 901044

Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:45

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 11:45
That spring looks flat, which indicates it is heavily loaded, unless the spring shackle has been used to tie the vehicle to the trailer.

Macca.
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Reply By: IvanTheTerrible - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:56

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 18:56
Just in case anyone thinks this problem is limited to Isuzu this is from the same company that recovered one of the Dmaxs.

AnswerID: 627082

Follow Up By: Ron N - Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:22

Tuesday, Aug 06, 2019 at 19:22
Ivan - Is that a L/Cruiser 70 series front axle?
It could have already done quite a substantial amount of kays, and been a bit tired.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 901060

Follow Up By: RMD - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:02

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 14:02
Don't you just align and reweld those bits back together?
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FollowupID: 901078

Follow Up By: axle - Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 15:18

Wednesday, Aug 07, 2019 at 15:18
RMD A bush fix to limp home would be done that way .lol


Have seen it done on a mack truck with a snapped rear housing out at Moree NSW.
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FollowupID: 901081

Reply By: Michael H9 - Monday, Aug 26, 2019 at 18:27

Monday, Aug 26, 2019 at 18:27
Just read on another forum of this problem on yet another Dmax, under gvm, no airbags and cracks after doing the csr.
AnswerID: 627436

Reply By: Tezza4567 - Monday, Aug 26, 2019 at 20:59

Monday, Aug 26, 2019 at 20:59
Thankyou everyone for your assistance and info, i have some good news on the crack difd housing, isuzu in Maddington approved and have replaced the rear diff housing under warranty, was quoted just under 3k to repair but they came to the party. Appreciate all the advice, have definately learned a few things.

Regards
Tezza
AnswerID: 627438

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