warning lights speed limit in NSW

Submitted: Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 15:06
ThreadID: 139079 Views:1828 Replies:3 FollowUps:18
This Thread has been Archived
Just got this from local the paper (could not get it to link site)
Motorists will no longer be required to slow down to 40 km/h on highways and motorways when passing flashing emergency vehicles in changes announced by the state government on Tuesday.
The government implemented a 12-month trail of the controversial slow down rule in 2018.
But now under the new rule, effective from September 26, motorists will be required to slow down to a speed that is "safe and reasonable for the circumstances" on roads with a speed limit of 90km/h or more.
The change is in an effort to avoid unsafe practices such as "hard-braking" on high speed roads
Drivers must also provide sufficient space between their vehicle and the emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights and are required to change lanes on a multi-lane road if it is safe to do so.
The rule also has been expanded to apply to motorists when passing stationary tow trucks and breakdown assistance vehicles displaying flashing yellow lights.
On lower speed roads, with a speed limit of 80km/h or less, motorists will continue to be required to slow to 40km/h when passing stationary tow trucks, breakdown assistance or emergency vehicles displaying flashing lights.
Minister for Roads Andrew Constance and Minister for Regional Roads Paul Toole said 926 infringements were issued during the 12-month trial, which aimed to keep emergency service workers safe while working by the roadside.
"We've monitored the impact of the rule over the past year and taken on board feedback from the public and stakeholders about the trial," Mr Constance said.
"We're now implementing changes to make the rule safer for everyone."
"These changes are about slowing down safely," Mr Toole said
Under the slow down road rule, motorists must not increase their speed until they are a sufficient distance past all the vehicles and people involved.
The rule does not apply when a stationary tow truck, breakdown assistance or emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights is on the opposite side of a divided road separated by a median strip.
NSW Police also adjusted its practices so officers are stopping in safer locations which are more visible to approaching drivers.
New advance warning signs are being designed for use by emergency services.
Assistant Commisioner Michael Corboy said the new rule is about ensuring the safety of not only police, but also other road users.
Back Expand Un-Read 4 Moderator

Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 16:59

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 16:59
That seems a sensible and welcome change to me, but I think they've left a group unprotected - road maintenance crews with vehicles displaying a flashing amber light. You often see them on country roads doing minor maintenance/patching where it might be impractical to display other warnings such as Roadworks in Progress signs etc.

I wonder if other states will follow the NSW lead.
AnswerID: 627746

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 17:11

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 17:11
The new rule will apply to vehicles with amber flashing lights, such as tow trucks, road maintenance crews etc.
1
FollowupID: 901925

Follow Up By: Member - Vince M (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 17:32

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 17:32
frank if you read it again, it is as shacker posted
0
FollowupID: 901926

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 18:30

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 18:30
I can only find reference to

"stationary tow trucks and breakdown assistance vehicles displaying flashing yellow lights."

I have just found this from the NSW Centre for Road Safety.

FAQ 8 says
"8. Does the rule apply to other vehicles with flashing yellow lights?
Other vehicles which have flashing yellow lights which are not breakdown assistance vehicles or tow trucks are NOT (my emphasis) part of the rule."

But then it goes on to say:
"However, when workers are conducting maintenance on roads they will generally have signage and a work zone speed limit in place.

Regardless, motorists should always proceed with caution when they see people working on or by the side of the road."

So I guess my specific question has been answered and I think the rest of the document will answer all other likely questions. It is quite informative.

Of particular relevance is the list of applicable "Emergency Vehicles" at FAQ 10.


0
FollowupID: 901927

Follow Up By: Shaker - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 20:00

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 20:00
Are you referring to the current law or the proposed revised law?
0
FollowupID: 901931

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 20:33

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 20:33
The proposed revised law. Here is the link.

In the third line of Follow Up #3 above I linked to the FAQ document associated with the revised law..
0
FollowupID: 901932

Follow Up By: Hoyks - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 07:56

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 07:56
Maintenance crews should already have out warning signs and local speed restrictions for the section they are working on.

Road maintenance is a planned event, not an emergency.
0
FollowupID: 901958

Follow Up By: tim_c - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:08

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:08
Noted Hoyks, but for patching an isolated pot-hole, they'd spend more time putting out the required signage than actually repairing the pot-hole. It is ridiculous to require all the usual warning signs and speed restrictions in every situation.
0
FollowupID: 901961

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:25

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:25
Thank you tim_c, that was my point.

Those guys are wandering on and off the actual road surface with shovels full of cold mix or whatever. Logically they deserve at least the same protection as any breakdown service person attending something on the side of the road.

When the rule first came in I happened upon a road maintenance crew patching up a rural road in SA. Just a truck with a flashing amber light, a driver and a couple of blokes with shovels. At that time I was unsure of the applicability of the rule and asked them on UHF if it applied to them. I was told it didn't, with some bitter commentary on how some lives are worth more than others.

I wonder why they missed out.
2
FollowupID: 901966

Reply By: Ron N - Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 22:11

Wednesday, Sep 18, 2019 at 22:11
Lets just hope S.A. falls into line with the national speed limit of 40kmh past roadworks and emergency vehicles - not the idiotic 25kmh that they introduced.

It's lunacy to expect drivers to hit the brakes and wash off 80-90kmh from highway speed, over a short distance - particularly when they have someone "pushy", right on their tail.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 627749

Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 07:46

Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 07:46
Howdy

Not long after this law was first introduced here in South Australia I was heading east along the south eastern freeway at 110 kph going with the flow in peak hour traffic when just over a rise was a caravan which lost a wheel and police parked behind it with lights flashing. WELL - the idiots up the front slammed on the brakes and you should have seen the mayhem - with cars now six wide and going everywhere I headed straight onto the grassed divider in the middle and passed the lot at about 80 kph to avoid a major accident and when I got down to about 60 kph I looked in the mirror to see about 5 other cars behind me doing the same.

How there wasn't a 30 car pile I don't know - can only be luck.

Recently the SA Police have requested this law be changed to avoid incidents like above - hope they do it soon !!


Trouble with South Australia is - we are not only 3 year behind the eastern states, we are 3 years AND half an hour behind lol

Happy and safe travels

Gazz
4
FollowupID: 901938

Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 11:41

Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 11:41
Ron & Gazz,
I was talking to Qld Highway patrol sergeant, his words, I hope Qld doesn't bring in those laws, as they will just be plain dangerous and I agree fully.

3
FollowupID: 901945

Reply By: Member - John - Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 15:51

Thursday, Sep 19, 2019 at 15:51
If it dangerous for police and emergency workers and now tow truck drivers and assistance vehicles, surely it is just as dangerous for some one changing a tyre or checking why the car stopped, put your hazard lights on and make traffic slow to 40k/hr....... it is where it is heading....
John and Jan

Member
My Profile  My Position  Send Message

AnswerID: 627753

Follow Up By: tim_c - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:12

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 10:12
Please don't ask questions like that - our law makers don't need any more ideas!
2
FollowupID: 901962

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:00

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:00
If someone is kneeling alongside the car on a roadside shoulder, replacing an off-side wheel, say, it would be common sense to slow down a bit and move over a bit if safe.

It's a shame we need a law to make that happen. It should be part of driver training. Not just rules, but a bit of roadcraft.

Perhaps instead of such a law we might get another that says you are not allowed to change a wheel yourself, you have to call one of the protected roadside assistance mobs with the flashing yellow light.

Maybe that's where its going :-)
5
FollowupID: 901967

Follow Up By: tim_c - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:05

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:05
If common sense prevailed, we wouldn't need the law requiring people to slow down when passing emergency services vehicles - it's a shame we needed a law to make that 'happen'.
4
FollowupID: 901969

Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:10

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 11:10
Couldn't agree more, tim_c.

0
FollowupID: 901970

Follow Up By: axle - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 13:16

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 13:16
Try being a lolly pop man for a few hrs and you soon realise the amount of nut case drivers out there!

Cheers Axle.
3
FollowupID: 901974

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew & Jen - Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 21:16

Friday, Sep 20, 2019 at 21:16
Indeed, recently a woman driver in Vic rammed a volunteer lollypop person because they delayed her AFTER she had picked up her own child!
2
FollowupID: 901979

Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 23:03

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2019 at 23:03
"The rule does not apply when a stationary tow truck, breakdown assistance or emergency vehicle displaying flashing lights is on the opposite side of a divided road separated by a median strip."


This above is most obvious but it is usually where people seem to slow and rubberneck at incidents across the road. In most cases its little more than a broken headlight in a low impact end to end accident although you can find yourself in a many kilometre traffic jam that was free flowing only a few minutes earlier! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

There's time to rest when you're dead,
Get out and do something instead!

Member
My Profile  My Blog  Send Message

2
FollowupID: 902079

Follow Up By: Banjo (WA) - Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 08:09

Thursday, Sep 26, 2019 at 08:09
Michael,

I gather from your report that you are fully experienced in 'rubber necking'?

Despite that dig the reality is that despite the put down intended by the use of the term 'rubber necking', the action is a natural human response.

Paul
0
FollowupID: 902085

Popular Content

Popular Products (13)