Bird Identification

On a recent trip down the David Carnegie Track we saw this bird, can anybody please identify as it wasn't in our bird book.
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 14:59

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 14:59
Possibly an Emerald Bee Eater?

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Reply By: ian.g - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 15:35

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 15:35
I think it could be a Red Backed Kingfisher
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:10

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:10
I'm with Ian.g on this - Red-backed Kingfisher, also sometimes known as the Desert Kingfisher, as it inhabits the drier inland regions.

Red-backed Kingfisher

Cheers, Ron.
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:48

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:48
Definitely a red-backed kingfisher - been a few sightings in the south west of WA recently - even one at Margaret River !!

Cheers
Greg
To penetrate this great unknown it would be necessary to first pass over the inhospitable regions described by Wells, Forrest & Giles - Carnegie 1896

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Reply By: Joe M8 - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 15:42

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 15:42
Maybe an azure Kingfisher,

Cherry.
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Reply By: Member - Lyncol - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:56

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 16:56
Thanks guys gone with the red backed kingfisher, while I’m going what’s a good app for bird identification, maybe e-bird?
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 17:03

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 17:03
Hi - does e-bird have pictures for ID? The Michael Morcombe eGuide to Australian Birds App is very popular.

I know apps are the go these days but would suggest a real book - such as Simpson & Day . There are others (I have also) but this one is pretty good and have used it for years.

Cheers
Greg
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Follow Up By: Member - Warren H - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 16:17

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 16:17
I have the Morcombe eGuide. Great for calls, good illustrations apalling search function. In the current example type in 'red backed kingfisher' and you won't get a hit it has to be exactly as it appears in the description 'red-backed kingfisher'. You find yourself going more and more general until you jag the correct keyword.
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Reply By: Member - rocco2010 - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 18:41

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 18:41
Seeing we have some bird people about, what is this?

Spotted in the ground at Stretch Lagoon at the top end of the CSR.

Just sat for maybe half an hour. I wondered if was ill or otherwise distressed or a youngster just resting. Eventually flew a short distance to a nearby tree and then further away.



Cheers
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 18:54

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 18:54
Whistling Kite (Haliastur sphenurus) I think
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Follow Up By: Member - rocco2010 - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 19:05

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 19:05
Thanks Explorer. I recall now somebody I was with might also have suggested that at the time.

Cheers

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Follow Up By: BobR4 - Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 20:43

Monday, Sep 30, 2019 at 20:43
Whistling kite.
Described as a rather drab hawk in some publication I once read.
Certainly could be described as drab.
I certainly disagree.
One of our rather lovely and benign natives, and to hear a pair whistling to each other is something which will stay with you always.
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Reply By: birdnerd - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 08:17

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 08:17
Hi Lincoln,
Looks like it could be a Little Eagle.
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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 10:01

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 10:01
Hi

Bird appears to lack black patches on crown, black streaking on neck and breast and erectile feathers on nape that are distinctive of Little Eagle. They are easier to tell apart from Whistling Kite when in flight.

Cheers
Greg
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Reply By: Darian - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 14:30

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 14:30
Me too Lyncol, re the Red Backed...cute little things, as most Kingfishers are (except for the larger Kookaburra which can at times be the neighborhood bully). Most pictures of this kingfisher suggest they are always having a 'bad feather day'. On bird books; my favoured bird reference is that of the late Graham Pizzey OAM; The Field Guide to the Birds of Australia; I have the 8th Edition - the 9th is now out. It includes Frank Knight's impressive illustrations of every bird in Australia. Worth every cent in my view and widely respected as authoritative. Graham was formally awarded a number of times over for his meticulous work, culminating in an honorary doctorate.
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Reply By: Member - Lyncol - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 17:20

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2019 at 17:20
Thanks to all who replied etc ,have the pizzy knight bird book but don’t know the edition will check it out when I get home. May have to start another discussion on Australian fauna as we have no books on this. Cheers
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