GPS and Oziexplorer

Submitted: Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 10:49
ThreadID: 13913 Views:3091 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
This Thread has been Archived
Now before anyone screams check the archives, I have.

I have been looking at GPS's, they seem to start around $200 and go to $1,000 for one with mapping. What does Oziexploer do. I have a flip top (I flip it open and it never sits on my lap), so will simply putting software on it and somehow connecting a cheap GPS give me mapping or some other wonderful features.

Or is it something completely different.

Who was the dick that said ignorance is bliss?

Jim.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Ian(Qld) - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 11:32

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 11:32
Jimbo,

I have a compaq flash GPS with a PCMCIA sleeve that is able to fitted to laptop or an IPAQ handheld. You can buy CF GPS on ebay for about $100. I have found that these are ideal as they have an external antenna as well as one on the CF GPS. That ensures superb satellite acquistion. Far cheaper than a lot of GPS systems.

You need to buy Oziexplorer laptop version ($142.59) from www.oziexplorer.com. You can download the trial version to try it out before you buy. The CE version cost about $48. Again you can completely configure the CE trial version before you buy it.

I use the moving map feature with an IPAQ using the AUSLIG maos available on CD. Absolutely fantastic. The maps need to be prepared on the laptop first then transferred to the IPAQ or other handheld. It is important to remember that is uses the Microsoft CE software.

I also scan my own National Park and other maps to give better coverage in smaller areas, including places like Canning Stock Route.

It may be confusing initially but it is well worth persisting with. SWMBO now loves the moving map navigation and is far more confident in the remote trips.

Hope this assists.
Regards
Iab
AnswerID: 63899

Follow Up By: Puddin (Sydney) - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 15:12

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 15:12
I'll second that.
0
FollowupID: 325044

Reply By: Nigel (WA) - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 11:35

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 11:35
Heya Jimbo

Exploroz.com has a great webpage just about GPS's and Oziexplorer software chek it out at http://www.exploroz.com/InfoPages/TripPrep12_DigitalNavigation.asp

It probably sums up everything you want to know :)

Nigel
AnswerID: 63900

Reply By: terracan tim - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 15:16

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 15:16
Jimbo just bid on a cf gps complete with adapter and external antena for $110 us seems the one in aus are about 300+ the brand is billionton claims to work with all the diferent map software
AnswerID: 63935

Reply By: Greg Harewood - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 16:58

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 16:58
Hello - while CF GPS cards + laptops are good keep in mind that if you ever get out of your 4WD and go for a walk you you probably wont want to carry the whole shabang with you..so getting a handheld gps which you can also connect to your laptop, while more expensive to set up, may suit your requirements better.
Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

AnswerID: 63952

Follow Up By: steve - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 18:27

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 18:27
I agree. Plenty of good GPS units out there around $300 that will work more reliably and be more versatile. Lowrance have one available that does mapping via sd card, called iFinder, That you can pick up for just over $300. You can visit the website www.lowrance.com and download a working versionto your pc to test it out. Look under software, then product emulators. I have the pro version and it works realy well. Can get them cheap if your interested.

Steve.
0
FollowupID: 325067

Follow Up By: Ian(Qld) - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 19:43

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 19:43
Hi,

The IPAQ can be used as a handheld GPS and is not much bigger than the Garmin 12 I was previously using, with the advantage is that I'm working off paper map images, far superior. This vector stuff is for prawn trawlers!!
Regards
Ian
0
FollowupID: 325085

Follow Up By: Greg Harewood - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 22:17

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 22:17
Ian - yes - I use a PDA with CF card and for my intended use...cannot be beaten (well probably could but not for the price). Scope of initial post was related to laptop so with this in regard and depending on user requirements/PC specifications handheld or CF GPS/Bluetooth GPS/GPS mouse etc were the only options. From reading other posts I gather 4WD users needs vary considerably. I (and you?) think PDA's are great but a lot of people already have laptops/GPS units and/or have no intention of straying too far from the track or car (where handheld GPS/PDA/Palm units are of course pretty handy)
Cheers
Greg
I sent one final shout after him to stick to the track, to which he replied “All right,” That was the last ever seen of Gibson - E Giles 23 April 1874

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 325105

Reply By: Utemad - Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 22:29

Saturday, Jun 19, 2004 at 22:29
If you are going to use your existing paper maps in OziExplorer don't forget that you are also going to need a scanner and a programme to piece the scanned images back together into one big map. I use Adobe Photoshop.

Of course you could use the feature that automatically goes from one map to another but it is much easier to plan trips if you have it as one big map. Although if you do this you will probably have to upgrade your memory in your laptop (depending how much you already have of course).

Utemad.
AnswerID: 64013

Follow Up By: Pluto - Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 13:29

Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 13:29
Utemad,

Have a look at the stiching software recommended by OziExplorer. Have a look at the Information link on the main page.

Panvue Image Assembler beats Photoshop for stitching scans together. Especially if you have to rotate individual scans to get the alignment right.
0
FollowupID: 325188

Follow Up By: Utemad - Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 14:31

Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 14:31
Pluto,

I downloaded the trial version of Panvue and it seems a little easier but I couldn't seem to get much control over what I was doing. I would think that while Panvue might do for more basic stuff Photoshop gives greater control over the whole process. Then again I guess it just depends on personal preference as I have used Photoshop for quite some time (although there is a whole array of things it can do that I know nothing about) and have only just downloaded Panvue today.

I'll keep hold of it and ty it out some more later anyway.

Thanks.

Utemad.
0
FollowupID: 325195

Follow Up By: Pluto - Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 14:43

Sunday, Jun 20, 2004 at 14:43
I haven't tried producing any panoramas withit yet. You need to know quite a lot about your camera and it's optics to set it up.

When it comes to stiching scans, it's easy. Panavue can control the scanner, which saves heaps of time. I only use photoshop to crop the edges off the final image.
0
FollowupID: 325197

Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 12:20

Monday, Jun 21, 2004 at 12:20
I have a Garmin GPS II Plus, great unit, you can use it without the PC on play day trips or plug in the Laptop and use them together with OziExplorer. Moving maps a brilliant. The Garmin charges while in the car, and if I ever need to take it with me, it's small and light and the batteries are always charged.
AnswerID: 64186

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (13)