Uluru Climb Closes Today

Submitted: Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:31
ThreadID: 139232 Views:2773 Replies:16 FollowUps:68
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Today is the final opportunity to climb Uluru and there was some dismay when today's 7am opening was delayed because of strong winds. It did open late which averted a possible riot! lol

There have been crowds of people lining up to climb over the past few weeks and today is no exception.

However, I expect that there will be an absolute 'tango' at the end of today as people jostle and hang back to earn the title of being "The Last Person to Ever Climb Uluru".
I wonder if a trophy or certificate will be issued to that lucky person.

I did consider being there today, but instead, I decided to get my hair cut.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:41

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:41
Where will it end, and as I have mentioned on the forum a couple of times, only 2 generations ago the Aboriginal Elders had no issue with people climbing Ayers Rock.

Hope the haircut went well.......lol



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Stephen
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:43

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:43
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Yeah, with less fuss than Uluru thanks Stephen. Roz did it!
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 08:18

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 08:18
National parks will be pleased about the closure, another little feather in their tiny hat! Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:22

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:22
Hi Michael

It’s not just Ayers Rock....

Here in South Australia they are trying to ban the climbing of St Mary Peak in the Flinders and the Sacred Canyon site will be closed to the general public, with the only access through a paid guide.
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:27

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:27
Stephen, just to provide a little balance. 2 generations ago there was very little people traffic up Uluru, now it is swarming with humans all doing their little bit of damage even if many are careful not to and others don't give a damn.

It is the same as property owners that have locked their gates because of damage to infrastructure, stock and littering.

So how much of Australia, are people locked out of by white fellas.




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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:12

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:12
Hi Stephen, Once the St Mary's Peak climbing ban is in force, the next part of the wedge will be the name change, its a definite! Regards Michael.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:42

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:42
Hi Eagle

Just to let you know some facts that I have posted before, and you may not be aware of.

An old man living here in Clare where I live was once a Park Ranger in the Northern Territory for many, many years.

He was based at Ayers Rock when it was first made a national park and witnessed many true, full blood aboriginals coming in from the desert and making first contact with white man.

Even back then it was a point with the ranges for the climbing of Ayers Rock, and when asking the full bloods of their issues with the climbing, they would reply that if white man is silly enough and wants to put put all his energy into climbing it, they had no issues.

Yes there were a number of places that were sacred to them around the base of the Rock, but nothing at the top.

Even in the early 1970’s when I first visited Ayers Rock, we went on a couple of guided walks with Ranges and Elders and were shown many of their Dreaming Story sites and other interesting places. Over the years we have been back many times, and slowly places that we once visited, with Aboriginal guides are now closed, as they are so called sacred sites and in in 2 generation of Aboriginal people, it has gone from climb if you like to now closed and sacred.


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Stephen
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:32

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:32
Stephen, I don't doubt for one minute what you say is correct but you may have missed my meaning.

Like Venice, Uluru is getting loved to death and they have closed the climb.

My slide on things is this. If a property owner or lease holder closes his gates or has never opened them no one has anything to say about it. But if the traditional owners do the same everyone comments.

Now the traditional owners have not closed the rock just the climb and their lands are mostly accessible to all even though permits can be a problem at times.

Mt Conner is not accessible as the property owner has closed gates. People don't say anything about that I notice.
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Follow Up By: qldcamper - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:44

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:44
As i was told when working at argyle, the aboriginals never claimed to OWN the land, they were custodians. As the recorded message says every time the plane lands at the mine.....traditional custodians, never heard the term traditional owners till recently.
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:50

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 12:50
Qld, you are correct and they always refer to land as country not my country.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:17

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 14:17
"Now the traditional owners have not closed the rock just the climb and their lands are mostly accessible to all even though permits can be a problem at times."

As a 5th generation South Australian, I can not get a permit to enter or drive on the roads in a significant proportion of the State that I live in, but I do contribute to the maintenance of the roads there.
I can get a permit to enter "private" pastoral land and that right is legislated.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:17

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:17
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"Own" or "custodians". It is simply semantics. Do any of us who have a "Title" to our properties actually "own" it. If a "Higher Power" (read Government) choose to take over the property they can do so. (Don't believe Darryl Kerrigan's win in "The Castle"). You may even argue that if you are only a 'custodian' you would not be required to pay land taxes etc as you would as an 'owner'...... but that would be foolish, wouldn't it? Certainly, tribal Aboriginals of past considered certain territories to be their own and strongly controlled who could enter or transit. This seems rather like "territorial ownership" to me.

As for "Country" and "My Country". Clearly "Country" means My Country. They don't mean someone else's Country, do they? Semantics again. Aboriginal expression does not always closely follow the European expression. In fact it usually does not even come close.

In fact, "ownership" resides with whosoever has the power to enforce such, and in Australia it currently resides with the European or white population. It was enforced in 1788 even though it was treated as a 'colony of settlement' on the basis of 'terra nullius'..... the land belonging to no-one. The action was forcibly supported by the gun and was in reality an act of invasion as has been the case with many countries in history. To pretend otherwise is deceptive.

Having taken possession, our government in recent times has chosen to grant "Title" to some areas to nominated groups of Aboriginal Communities who are then able to control access to those lands. This is a form of apartheid which may or may not be ultimately satisfactory to those Aboriginal occupants. It certainly it not entirely acceptable to some white citizens. Whether this course of action is lastingly successful in harmonious occupation of the nation remains to be seen. Historically, invasive occupation eventually evolved into acceptance of the stronger group and assimilation prevailed. Maybe that may happen in Australia..... I just hope it does not take another 40,000 years!
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:58

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 17:58
Apartheid ??? I know whites have tied up much more of Australia than Aboriginals.

Pastoral, Mining, Urban sprawl, Military areas and it goes on. All they have done is stopped people from accessing the top of a hill.

How about getting access to the Mt Conner and we could all climb that hill.
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Follow Up By: qldcamper - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 07:31

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 07:31
It wont Allan, the muslims will control it in 2 generations.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:47

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:47
I am prepared to take bets , 6-12 months and 'brochures' will be printed for escorted / guided climbs of the rock , mega $$$ of course and the word 'exclusive' will be included ...NOTHING is as SACRED as the almighty $$$$$......we now already have the 'traditional' owners calling for climbing bans of the GlassHouse mountains on the Sunshine Coast [ Qld ] ...all of a sudden they have become 'sacred' ........Mt. Everest is 'sacred' to the Sherpa and Nepalese yet $$$$$$ make it 'alright ' .... the $$$$ will prevail .......
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:54

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:54
Alloy, the beauty of Everest is can claim the highest peak in the world and at the same time the highest rubbish tip in the world. Lol.

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Reply By: RMD - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:43

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:43
Allan
Did you require or have trouble getting a permit signed by an elder for that activity? How far in advance did you have to book?
I imagine the $$$$$$$$ takings at the rock will also now take a significant haircut.
I heard a sign is being placed at Erldunda to say Central Australia is closed.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:49

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 15:49
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No need for a haircut permit. Done "in-house". lol

And it does remain to be seen how the closure affects Uluru tourist numbers.
My bet is that it will be little. Time will tell.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: The Explorer - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 16:03

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 16:03
Read somewhere else that only ~10% of tourists climb it and I am sure most of those would still have turned up even if it was closed - so don't expect a big change, if any. Lots of tourist attractions are "unclimbable" but still draw a crowd.

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Greg
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Follow Up By: noggins - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 17:50

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 17:50
If I claim Aboriginal descent ( remember your not allowed to ask me to prove it ) can I then climb the rock ?

But Mt Augustus is bigger and there's no problems there so far
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Follow Up By: Member - DingoBlue(WA) - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 18:57

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 18:57
Mt Meharry is bigger than Mt Augustus and Mt Augustus is bigger than Uluru however neither are Monoliths like Uluru. I also understand that Kata Tjuta is also taller than Uluru.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 20:07

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 20:07
My father climbed Mt Olga in 1956.


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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:26

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:26
I might add that he also climbed Uluru at that time. There was no chain, but climbing Uluru was easier than climbing Mt Olga because Mt Olga is a conglomerate and rocks were likely to come adrift as you stood on them resulting in both danger and damage which is why climbing was banned many years ago.
He climbed Uluru before dawn and watched the sunrise from the top. He took a pic that showed the shadow of Uluru going above the horizon. Wish I could find it.
The legendary Bill Harney, the Park's first Ranger, was there at the time although other info suggests that he was not appointed until 1957, so I am a bit confused on that point.
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Peter
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:27

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:27
I think the tourism to the rock will be the same but instead of staying a certain number of days, maybe most will stay a day less. Turn up in the afternoon and see the sun set, walk the base of the rock the next and head off the following day. Janet and myself like to keep moving if there is not much happening or things to do. We have been to Ayres Rock twice and didn't feel the need to climb even though we have always been fairly fit. Last year we went to Darwin and we didn't consider going to Ayres Rock on the way past, we would rather see something we haven't seen before. Regardless of the climb closure, its still a magical place to visit and I hope people from home and abroad still keep coming. Michael
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Reply By: rumpig - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 18:50

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 18:50
Such a shame they closed the climb, the views a top the rock are well worth the effort of making the climb...not just the views looking out from the rock, but also looking at the various sections of the rock itself from above.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 21:35

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 21:35
Time for everyone to climb the biggest one then.... Mount Augustus is the largest monolith in the world. It is 2.5 times larger than Uluru (Ayers Rock). We were there in July - with hardly anyone else! It's a very challenging climb of 6km up then 6km down and its free.
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Follow Up By: Alan S11 - Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 23:00

Friday, Oct 25, 2019 at 23:00
Mt Augustus is indeed majestic. Geologically speaking it is a monocline not a monolith.

Great spot to visit. It is so large it looks like a mountain range on its own. It is proclaimed as the largest rock in the world by locals.

Road around the base is 55km with quite a few interesting smaller walks and climbs around the 'hill'.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:51

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 11:51
Won't be 'free' for long ......
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Follow Up By: Candace S. - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:39

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:39
"Mount Augustus is the largest monolith in the world."

Not according to the WA Parks and Wildlife Service:

"Because Mount Augustus is composed of multiple rock types it is inaccurate to call it a monolith – meaning one rock type – or claim that it is the ‘world’s biggest rock’."

Mt Augustus Nat'l Park web page
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 08:09

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 08:09
This sort of thing will ever end. Now there is talk of changing the name of the Yarra River. To what end who knows! Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:14

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 08:14
Michael, I believe that the name “Yarra” is an indigenous word.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:46

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:46
Hi Macca, that is partly correct. Apparently when the river was named in the early 1800s, the local Aboriginals were asked what the river was called. The said Yurra and that was thought to sound like Yarra. So it was not 100 correct but being named for almost 200 years, you would think that's good enough. Obviously some little bearded, pointy faced weasel in a three metre square government office somewhere, thought he should take it upon himself fix the "issue" and hell to our own 250 year history! Michael
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Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 18:07

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 18:07
...Thinking out aloud, a 250 year history sounds like a nano-second in a country inhabitated by an indigenous people for 40,000 years plus.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:03

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:03
Baz , a history of 40,000 years ? A stone age family /tribal culture of 720 different 'tribes' with 700 different language speech patterns with no written language or even hieroglyphics constantly at war with each other , no sense of 'ownership' being a collective yet NOW we are the 'bad ' guys ? ......You do know don't you that even 'dot painting ' did not exist until shown by 'whites' an easy way to paint 'pretty' pictures ....
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Reply By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:25

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 09:25
Allan

What is the bet that those with money to burn with pay the $600 fine and climb it for the hell of it?

They said that will be the fine for people trying to climb it after last night
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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:01

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:01
I think anyone climbing it once the chains are removed (they are starting doing that Sunday I heard on tv news) will be very surprised how steep the climb is, and being how slippery the surface was last year when I climbed it, i reckon it'll be a scary experience with nothing to hold onto on that first steep section of the climb. Once you scale that first main chain section to the small flat area above the steep bit there's that short chain bit you pull yourself up, getting up there with no chain would be interesting also. Not saying it can't be done, but definately would be more dangerous to do with no chains in place.

Below are a few pics from my climb last year......





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Follow Up By: Member - Scrubby (VIC) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 22:10

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 22:10
No Chain or Painted Line.
April 1964 it was when myself and three mates camped in a tent at the bottom of Ayres Rock less than 100 meters from the spot where you could start to climb it. ( It didn`t matter where you camped and there was no charge for anything that I can recall.)
A ranger dropped in that first evening and we had a very enjoyable and lengthy talk about many things, I remember his advice to wear a long sleeve shirt, long trousers, thick socks and desert boots or similar and a hat. He said that the thick socks and desert boots were to prevent the skin being rubbed off the tops of your toes when coming down. He also advised starting the climb as early as possible .
He asked us not to go into the caves on the Eastern side as this was a sacred area to the local Aboriginal people, although I can`t recall seeing any until we got to Alice Springs.
There was no chain or any painted line to follow, only a slightly smoother trail on the surface, at the top there was post with a piece of ply wood about two foot square attached, also a large pencil probably ten inches long and three quarters if an inch diameter for writing ones name on the board.

How things change ay.

Scrubby


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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 22:50

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 22:50
We climbed in 1967.




And again in 1970 and again in 1974....

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Follow Up By: rumpig - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 23:15

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 23:15
Yes Scrubby how things change....I first climbed the rock about 20 years ago and don’t recall the rock being slippery back then like it was when we climbed it last year, it would appear all the climbers over the years have worn the rocks surface much smoother then I recall it used to be.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:51

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 11:51
Stephen, I read only yesterday, the fine is going to be $6,600. I thought it may have been a misprint, so who knows! Michael.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 12:22

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 12:22
Hi Michael

Yes when they first posted it, they said it was the $600 fine, yet when I looked again last night, it was over $6000

Good money spinner.....lol
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Follow Up By: Steve in Kakadu - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 13:04

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 13:04
The fines will vary depending on what EPBC Regulations the person has breached and or infringed, EG: walking off track, proceeding passed a prohibited area sign, or both etc.

However, if the person doesn't pay the fine and are prosecuted, the fines could be as high as $10,000.

A ranger under the EPBC Act, can either give an on the spot fine or recommend further action depending on the circumstances. Where as a Warden has much higher powers, EG: search and seize etc.

A Warden or Ranger can also take the educational approach in minor breaches with a ranger providing information and a warning, both can ask for identification and both can give a direction. Failing to give ID and or heed a direction is also a breach of the act.

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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:09

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:09
Whatever the fines are it will not matter 1 iota , give it 6-12 months and as long as you pay a substantial fee for the guided climbing tour you will be able to climb ..... 'Sacred' ? The $$$$$$ is sacred .......
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Follow Up By: Candace S. - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:51

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:51
In May 2008, the fine ("penalty") was $5,500.

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Reply By: Steve in Kakadu - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:04

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:04
Traditional Owners taking back control of their land, what an awesome thing.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:14

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:14
Let them run it then. What are National Parks doing there? Michael
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Follow Up By: Steve in Kakadu - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:32

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:32
It's called joint management.

I'm a white fella working in joint management, doing what ever I can to enable traditional owners to take control of their land.

And I'm proud of it.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:34

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:34
.
Michael,

"National Parks" are there doing a good job of running the park as are the operators of Ayers Rock Resort and associated businesses.
Without their expertise and business acumen it would be a pretty basic show.

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Allan

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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:53

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 10:53
Steve, No one would disagree with that. Michael
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Follow Up By: Robin Miller - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:32

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:32
Its so sad really -you would think that in this day and age their would be tolerance for the views of those that to wish to climb it.





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Follow Up By: Steve in Kakadu - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 13:26

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 13:26
Robin. Its so sad really -you would think that in this day and age their would be tolerance for the views of those that to wish you not to climb it.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:51

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:51
Only in recent times has it been questionable to climb the rock. Previously Elders endorsed it, saw no problem with it, but recent generations have been taught by activists to prevent any actions they suddenly feel somehow lessens their importance.
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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:16

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:16
Watch , soon , very soon the brochures will be printed and distributed "For fully escorted and guided climbs of the rock " ....... There are $$$$$$ to be made and they will be ....Mt. Everest is 'Sacred' to the Nepalese and the native Sherpa ....... $$$$$$ lets you climb it .....
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Follow Up By: Candace S. - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:48

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 12:48
Pic of elders on Uluru, published in National Geographic Magazine, Feb. 1988.



Uluru was in existence long before any humans lived on Australia. So does any group have more right than another to control use of it? Just a thought.
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:05

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:05
.
Here is an interesting article from the ABC News website about "The Chain" and more.
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Reply By: Gerard S - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:47

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:47
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:59

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:59
.
Very clever Gerard. Perhaps you should accredit the source.
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Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34

Saturday, Oct 26, 2019 at 15:34
My wife and I have climbed mount Augustus, and yes, it’s awesome!
Will do it again when back in that part of the country. ( haven’t climbed Uluru , for some reason I didn’t rate climbing it very high)
Mount Meharry is worth the drive too! Only a short bit of serious bad rock to negotiate, or I guess you could walk the whole climb.
There’s certainly a lot of things as good or better than “the rock”!!!!
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Reply By: Banjo (WA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 09:34

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 09:34
Amazing how some people want to be 'traditional' but couldn't survive without another culture looking after them.

If I am too lazy to mow my lawn, or to clean up rubbish on my property should I expect everyone to be the same? Walk up a rock? Nah, I'm too lazy to do that.

If land 'rights' are given how about the traditional people go back to living on it without all the benefits that the 'invaders' brought.

No, easier to moan that the world owes me a living. That's why in 50,000 years nothing improved for some people.

Pyramids, Colosseum, Parthenon, Irrigation Canals, Sun Temples etc etc around the world.
In Australia - ???

AnswerID: 628343

Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 14:55

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 14:55
No wheels invented in Australia either. Each person identifying as Aboriginal is supported, by the taxpayer, to the tune of around$50,000 each year. No wonder some look quite pale. The paler skin identifiers are mostly the problem as they have the most to lose.
3
FollowupID: 902668

Follow Up By: Baz - The Landy - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 18:23

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 18:23
“...In Australia???”

Didn’t waste their time building stuff that’s crumbling and decaying today, remnants of another era.

In Australia our indigenous people spent their time camping, hunting, fishing, snoozing under a tree in the middle of the day, and having a good laugh around a camp fire at night.

Hell, wait on, sounds like the lifestyle many of the people on ExplorOz dream off...!

Maybe we aren’t that dissimilar.

Cheers, Baz - The Landy
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FollowupID: 902673

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 20:01

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 20:01
Hanging out with naked women is another plus I suppose?
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FollowupID: 902677

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 20:59

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 20:59
"Hell, wait on, sounds like the lifestyle many of the people on ExplorOz dream off."
Yes, but only for 4 weeks of the year. If your lucky. :)
Dave.
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FollowupID: 902678

Reply By: Member - David M (SA) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 10:55

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 10:55
Hope they don't seek any compensation for pain and suffering caused by people climbing the rock as I signed the book in 89. Most of my time on top was spent taking photo's of Japanese tourists with their cameras as proof they had climbed it.
Dave.
AnswerID: 628344

Follow Up By: RMD - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 15:01

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 15:01
Most of the crevices below accessible areas are littered with iPads, cameras, hats, money, jewellery and the occasional human body etc. Perhaps that is the reason for the closure.
0
FollowupID: 902669

Reply By: Gerard S - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 16:45

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 16:45
Interesting to see the Aborginal culture being compared to the Parthenon, inventing the wheel etc. I'm not Australian and I'm amazed a race of people could exist here in such a barren country with no animals worth domesticating or grains worth cultivating. Please compare like with like
AnswerID: 628349

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 19:12

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 19:12
.
Hi Gerard,

I'm with you..... at least, I think I am.

Interesting that "Pyramids, Colosseum, Parthenon, Irrigation Canals, Sun Temples etc etc" are quoted apparently as desirable achievements, yet all those cultures lasted only a relatively short time and have now vanished. Yet the 'Australian' Aboriginal race has existed for 40,000 years quite stably until we Europeans came along and stuffed it all up for them. Arguably, we owe them and we have not been smart enough in 200 years to sort it out.
Cheers
Allan

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FollowupID: 902674

Follow Up By: nick g1 - Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 12:01

Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 12:01
Gerard
Interesting read for you
"Dark Emu"
By Bruce Pascoe
You will be enlightened
2
FollowupID: 902693

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 18:19

Monday, Oct 28, 2019 at 18:19
None of the others could invent a boomerang.....

Aboriginal inventions
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FollowupID: 902721

Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:24

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 12:24
Sorry Michael H9 , but Boomerangs were also used in Ancient Egypt and have been found in various tombs -burial mounds from different peoples - cultures world wide ....... 'whats a boomerang that does not come back ' A STICK.
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FollowupID: 902800

Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 17:25

Wednesday, Oct 30, 2019 at 17:25
Those Egyptian ones were left as gifts by the aboriginals as they migrated through from Africa on their way to paradise. They left a few in India and Papua too.
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FollowupID: 902807

Follow Up By: Candace S. - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 13:03

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 13:03
"...yet all those cultures lasted only a relatively short time and have now vanished."

Inventions of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans are the foundation of modern society and technology. And all that happened in just a few thousand years.

Also, last time I checked, Egypt, Greece, and Rome all still exist, they certainly haven't vanished.
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FollowupID: 902817

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 16:20

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 16:20
.
Candace,

The ancient cultures that created the "Pyramids, Colosseum, Parthenon, Irrigation Canals, Sun Temples" no longer exist and in fact prevailed for only a short time compared to the Aboriginal nation's stable 40,000 years.

Furthermore, although your "Egypt, Greece, and Rome" may still exist as geographic countries, the societies that created the "Pyramids etc." have long since disappeared. Check again!

You are just playing with words seemingly to refute my above assertion.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Alloy c/t - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 17:48

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 17:48
Alan B , dare you to tell an Egyptian or Greek or an Italian that they and their culture no longer exists , yes they have evolved to be part of the 21st century in many aspects but have traditions that can in fact be documented , unlike ours who swap and change as soon as a $$$$$ is involved , even their own 'dreamtime' stories get changed as soon as a $ is mentioned ... all of a sudden the Glasshouse Mountains have become in the last week 'sacred' .......Why is that ??
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FollowupID: 902826

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 18:12

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 18:12
.
Alloy,

I did NOT say "they and their cultures no longer exist. I said that "The ANCIENT cultures that created the Pyramids etc. no longer exist". That's very different and you also are distorting my words to make a cheap point. Cut it out!

As for the Glass House Mountains..... maybe because "ours" ( they are called Aboriginals) just have got around to it?
After all, when you've just done 40,000 years, what's another year or two?
Cheers
Allan

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FollowupID: 902827

Reply By: RMD - Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 19:25

Sunday, Oct 27, 2019 at 19:25
Ayers Rock is just another victim of CLIMB IT change.
AnswerID: 628352

Reply By: Gerard S - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 10:42

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 10:42
Uluru.
AnswerID: 628392

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 10:53

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 10:53
.
Gerard,
Either name, Uluru or Ayers Rock may be used.
This link may clarify it for you.
Cheers
Allan

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FollowupID: 902742

Follow Up By: Member - ACD 1 - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 11:05

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 11:05
Hi Allan

It's actually a Facebook link to the 30 anniversary version of the song Solid Rock by Goanna.


Perhaps it would help if People who post links actually said it was a link and where it led. To me it looked like a EO places link.

Cheers

Anthony
VKS 3539
Work - a 40 hour interuption to my weekend!
Too many places - too little time

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FollowupID: 902744

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 11:21

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 11:21
.
Yes, thanks Anthony.
I didn't even try Gerard's link. I thought it was a correction to RMD's use of the word "Ayers Rock" in the post immediately above. This is what comes from terse expressions!
Cheers
Allan

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FollowupID: 902745

Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:06

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:06
The official gazetted name of the Rock is not Uluru or Ayers Rock, but is Uluru/Ayers Rock so that is now its official name.

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FollowupID: 902748

Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:20

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 12:20
.
It is gazetted as a 'dual name'. It is not "Uluru Ayers Rock" as one name. (with or without the slash)
Either "Uluru" or "Ayers Rock" may bee used. (until they change it yet again! lol)
Cheers
Allan

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FollowupID: 902750

Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 15:13

Tuesday, Oct 29, 2019 at 15:13
Why don't we have it conform to the other tourist attraction names and call it The Big Rock, as in the Big Pineapple/ Lobster/ Guitar/ Wombat etc etc etc.
Dave.
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FollowupID: 902758

Reply By: Candace S. - Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 13:18

Thursday, Oct 31, 2019 at 13:18
As an avid "peakbagger", I'm still a bit sad I couldn't visit the top of Uluru. I was in Oz for nearly three months this year, and considered going out. (I visited there in 2008 but the climb was closed.) However, the reported crowds out there put me off. I knew I wouldn't enjoy it, so I didn't see the point.

Anyway, I did add 37 Oz summits to my lifetime peaks list. Ranging from easy drive-ups to St Mary Peak. :)

One of them, Mount Wudinna, is reputedly the second largest monolith in Australia. So I guess that was my consolation prize, LOL.

AnswerID: 628441

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