Pick this place

Submitted: Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 08:34
ThreadID: 139355 Views:1498 Replies:11 FollowUps:8
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Reply By: lizard - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 09:30

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 09:30
Skytrek , Flinders Ranges
AnswerID: 628787

Reply By: Member - Jim S1 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:23

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:23
Mt Kosciusko maybe ?

Cheers
Jim
AnswerID: 628789

Reply By: Joe Fury - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:25

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 11:25
G'day Shane r1

Good day Explorers, the summit Cairn on the highest point of terrain in Western Australia ~ Mount MeHarry ~ Karijini National Park.

Safe travels : Joe
AnswerID: 628790

Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:22

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:22
Morning everyone
Joe’s got it. Mount Meharry summit.
One short section of nasty rocky stuff to negotiate but the rest is easy.
Cheers
Shane
AnswerID: 628791

Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:53

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 12:53
Another distinctive cairn.



Cheers,
John
AnswerID: 628792

Follow Up By: Mick O - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:20

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:20
Everard Ranges?
''We knew from the experience of well-known travelers that the
trip would doubtless be attended with much hardship.''
Richard Maurice - 1903

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Reply By: Member - Graham D2 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 14:58

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 14:58
Tower Rock
AnswerID: 628795

Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:29

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:29
Graham is correct. The cairn is located on top of Tower Rock in the Mac & Rose Chalmers Conservation Reserve.

The reserve is near Binns Track in the NT. It is a great place to camp amongst rock formations with spectacular colour changes at sunrise and sunset.



Cheers,
John
AnswerID: 628798

Follow Up By: Member - Graham D2 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 17:50

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 17:50
John we had the place to ourselves for two nights and I spent an hour and a half at the cairn waiting and watching the sun go down. We visted last year after travelling the Anne Beadell, Gunbarrel, CSR and then heading south along the Binn's from the Davenport Ranges. As you say it is a great place to camp, explore the rock formations and the long drops are a classic.
Graham
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Reply By: Member BarryG - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:46

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 16:46
While you're all in the mood for cairns, how about this one?

Barry
AnswerID: 628799

Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 20:44

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 20:44
Hi Barry.

Your cairn looks familiar but I cannot find one of my own photos to confirm my memory. Is it McConkey Hill near well 10 on the Canning Stock Route?

Cheers,
John
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Follow Up By: Member BarryG - Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 21:50

Monday, Nov 25, 2019 at 21:50
No John, sorry.

But you are in the correct state, just too far north-west.

Barry
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Reply By: Member BarryG - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 09:37

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 09:37
Looks like a clue is required for my cairn photo.
OK, it's at a spot named after a day of the week.

Barry
AnswerID: 628802

Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 10:06

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 10:06
Thanks for the clue.

Point Sunday on the Anne Beadell Highway.



John
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Reply By: Member BarryG - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 12:44

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 12:44
You got it John!

We think it may have been erected by Frank Hann as he named Point Sunday.
But I haven't found anything to support this theory.

Barry
AnswerID: 628804

Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 14:51

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 14:51
According to Ian Elliot’s excellent guide book to Hann’s Track, Point Sunday was named by Frank Hann when he camped nearby on Sunday 17 May 1903. The cairn and post visible today were erected by surveyor C.L.Findlay in 1929.



The guide book is essential reading for Hann’s Track but also has a lot of interesting information about parts of the Anne Beadell and Connie Sue Highways and the Great Central Road.

Cheers,
John
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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 19:29

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 19:29
Looks like Talbot and Clarke came through in 1916.
They either marked a tree or post - Reverse J number 2 (Mixture of T and C)

Looking for adventure.
In whatever comes our way.

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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 21:09

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 21:09
Some more information about Point Sunday from Ian Elliot’s guide book:

In 1903 Frank Hann’s aboriginal companion Talbot marked a mulga ‘F HANN XV111/V/03’ and carved ‘TALBOT’ on another. These trees are long-gone, the victims of lightning strike wildfires.

In 1916 the geologist H.W.B. Talbot blazed another tree at Point Sunday. This tree was situated on the track to the car park until comparatively recently.

From the top you can see many other features named by Frank Hann- Dorothy Hills, Dungey Table Hill, Mallee
Hen Point, Little View Hill and Stony Point.

Hann named lots of features after barmaids he met in bush pubs. Within a few days drive ofPoint Sunday there are Dorothy Hills, Lily Rockhole and Amy Rockhole to name just a few.

Cheers,
John



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Reply By: Member BarryG - Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 17:19

Tuesday, Nov 26, 2019 at 17:19
Thanks John,

We really enjoyed our trip across the Ann Beadell Hwy and wish I'd had that book.
We did take the whole Len Beadell set with us though.

Barry
AnswerID: 628810

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