Do I have all the spares I should be carrying?

Submitted: Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 07:22
ThreadID: 139371 Views:1437 Replies:16 FollowUps:19
Here are the spares I carry in my 200 Series Landcruiser for remote area travel. I share here in case you are looking for ideas for your own spares box. If you can see that I am missing something please let me know. Keep the shiny side up!
https://youtu.be/S_iSSNXvnW0
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Reply By: Member - shane r1 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 07:54

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 07:54
You know Murphy’s law.
You can carry a lot of stuff and you’ll probably need something else!
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 08:22

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 08:22
Yes, I saw a Prado on the Canning Stock Route with a collapsed alternator bearing!
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Follow Up By: B1B2 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 10:31

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 10:31
The experienced 4wder leader of my 1st CSR trip insisted the alternator was serviced before we left, and that I carry king pin studs for my 80 series. I had to replace the studs on the trip as one snapped.
For my 200 I would carry a second spare carcass and the usual assortment of plugs and patches.
We had one vehicle that couldn't fit in a 2nd spare and ripped a hole in a sidewall, this was removed at Durba and internally patched successfully.
Carry a beadbreaker, tyre levers and know how to reseat the bead on the rim.
I have learned that alloys rims need soap when exploding the tyre onto the rim or they bounce back because the bead is wider than a steel rim. (don't forget to remove the schrader valve core)
On my last trip a 100 series had cv joint problems even though it had been serviced. The circlip had come off the spline and you could see the bearing. We got him back together and sent him home via the Talawanna Tk. (he checked in with the police at Newman so I knew he was ok).
Enjoy the trip.
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Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:13

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:13
Thanks for the feedback
I don’t have the room to carry a spare carcass but do have tyre levers, bead breaker etc and internal patches, along with the knowledge to use them.
All the others spares you mention I have on board, except the circlips. I’ll add those to my kit, thanks.
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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 08:39

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 08:39
For my 200, apart from the obvious, I carry 2 spare fuel filters and instructions on how to reset the light, an air filter, a spare brush for the alternator, a few spare wheel studs and nuts.

Sorry, I don't have 20 mins to sit through the video, so apologies if you have these covered.

Tony
200 with 2012 Tvan Canning.
Happiness >= your perception of the events in your life minus your expectation of how life should be.

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Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 09:47

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 09:47
All good Tony, got the, thanks for replying.
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Reply By: Member - David M (SA) - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 09:46

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 09:46
Your missing the pack of playing cards. :)
Dave.
AnswerID: 628867

Reply By: RMD - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 10:52

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 10:52
Terry
Haven't seen the video, but do you have spare boots for the front cv's and grease to refill the cv?
Do you have a spare idler bearing/pulley for the belt system on the engine if the idler bearing destroys itself? OR the alternator has to be taken out of the belt system? Is the vehicle equipped with enough solar to supply the battery and electricals if the diodes blow in the alternator? 'cos if not, the whole thing will stop soon.
I carry a small whipper snipper engine and alternator which can simply be plugged into an Anderson plug and supply the whole vehicle electrical system and used while you drive.
I presume you take an OBD code reader and a printout of codes to point you in the right direction if a limp mode suddenly presents.
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Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:20

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:20
Thanks for the reply.
Yes, all the spares you mentioned I have on board. I do not carry spare CV boots but do have an entire new CV on board.
I also have 345 watts of solar on the RTT and another 150 with a solar blanket so at ~500 watts I should be fine for regular charging should the alternator pack it in.
I also have a code reader and list of what each code is.
Cheers!
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Reply By: Member - DickyBeach - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 11:50

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 11:50
I confess I didn't watch the 20 minute video so I may be speaking out of turn.

I'm all for carrying spares - I have radiator hoses and fan belts stuffed in the side panels of my #80LC plus fuses, and in my KK also spare shocks for the 80 BUT the CSR is only 2000kms and although extremely corrugated, if one drives to the conditions and not thrash the hell out of everything why should huge spares be needed any more than for any other trip, including around town.


And for those who might scoff at my comments please refer to post 7590 (from 2003).

AnswerID: 628870

Reply By: ian.g - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:18

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:18
All the spares and tools in the world are not going to help you if you don't know how to use them, I know people say that someone will come along that knows what is wrong and how to fix it, but how long is a piece of string and if you are really going into true remote areas the wait could be considerable. In the mean time have fun playing cards with your pack of cards as suggested by Dave.
AnswerID: 628873

Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:22

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 12:22
Thanks Ian, I know my stuff around mechanicals.
If I didn’t I would not risk remote area travel.
Cheers
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 17:26

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 17:26
Have a look a few posts up, Failed Alternator Post, Maybe that's something we should all carry a spare of, fairly small and can really get you out of trouble! Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

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Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 17:39

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 17:39
Thanks for the reply Michael.
My cars got 130k on the clock. As I expect the alternator to last a while longer (famous last words) and I don’t really have the room to carry a spare alternator, that’s off my list. Having said that, I carry a set of brushes for my alternator as one fix if that plays up. Secondly, I have 345 watts of solar on the roof plus another 150 watts via a solar blanket. Call it 500 watts total among friends, that would allow me to charge the battery back up with reasonable speed between discharges and get me out of trouble anyway. Cheers
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 18:44

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 18:44
Sounds like a plan Terry. Michael
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Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

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Get out and do something instead!

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Reply By: Dave B18 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:14

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:14
Basically only carry a spare fuel filter and air filter.
Do proper maintainence, and to date never had any failures.
Don't wait for things like alternators to fail, change the bearings and brushes and inspect at 160,000km. Strip and check the starter motor at the same time. Replace the main vehicle start battery ever three years regardless. Replacing the starter battery every three years greatly increases the life of the starter motor. Replace tyres at around 55% to 60% wear state and have no issue selling the tyres second hand. Do rotate tyres so replace all five. Have proven the extensive maintainence I do on a vehicle pays dividends and prevents breakdowns and negates carrying spares for what you have no idea may fail.
The extra and excessive weight people carry is often the cause of failures or breakdowns. Due to never being overweight, have never replaced a tyre on any of our extended trips.
AnswerID: 628888

Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 21:25

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 21:25
Dave.
You and I think very much the same way. Do the maintenance and have no trouble. Though I admit to pushing my power steer belt to the limit once and only got 17 years use out of it. No warranty was entertained.
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:15

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:15
.
You could carry the contents of a dealer's parts store with you and still not have the essential part that you need. So you carry some things that you think are most likely.
And there are all sorts of workarounds and fixes that may get you out of trouble to some extent.
You also may well rely on the support of fellow travellers.

But there is one essential that without it your vehicle is not gunna move.
And that is a wheel bearing. Without that you cannot even be towed to safety.
So it should be the first thing in the spares kit. Maybe two if the design so dictates.
Fence wire will not substitute for a wheel bearing.
Of course, you or someone with you needs to have the tools and knowledge to fix it.
But you need the bearing to do the fix. At least you could be towed. Consider it.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 21:28

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 21:28
Alan
Usually bearings only fail if insufficient grease or poor adjustment and hammering occurs. That is different with sealed type setups though. Few replace sealed wheel bearings until they talk to you.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 11:53

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 11:53
.
R,

"Usually"? ..... It is 'un-usually' that we are talking about here. We don't have a problem until the unusual happens. And wheel bearings of any type, on any vehicle, fail more often than many other things..... fortunately, and probably due to good preventative maintenance, I have not experienced a wheel bearing failure. But I shall continue to carry a spare. It's not big or heavy, not too hard to install, and can get me out of a major dilemma.

But it can be the 'unusual' that will land you in strife every time. Here's an example...............
Several years ago travelling from the East Coast to the West Coast via the Anne Beadell Hwy we reached Karijini National Park and found that we had a problem with our 'steering knuckle arm' which incorporates the retaining plate for the lower steering (king pin) bearing. It is attached by four 10mm studs of which three had fractured. Loss of the fourth would have meant instant and total loss of steering together with loss of front wheel support. Now this failure is pretty '"unusual" but nonetheless dramatic. We limped into Karratha to get it fixed but would not have been able to proceed had we been on desert tracks when it failed. The mechanic was astonished that we could drive it at all. So was I actually!
The failed studs were due to stress fracture and the AB corrugations contributed to their final demise. Maybe they were not correctly torqued but the torque of every critical stud on the Troopy is not part of its trip preparation. Perhaps it should be.........???
Of course, the same studs on the opposite wheel were inspected.

My point is that it can be unwise to rely on "usual" factors when a simple action can provide a measure of assurance. And of course, Murphy's capricious algorithms play a major part. lol
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Gronk - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:38

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 19:38
I carry bugger all...a spare fuel filter, a serpentine belt ( because I changed it recently ) and some tools.

Do you tow anything ? If you do, you're probably over weight !!
AnswerID: 628892

Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 20:54

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 20:54
Nope, do not tow nor would I. Too restrictive in my opinion, simple and light is my moto.
Cheers
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Follow Up By: Hewy54 - Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 22:51

Saturday, Nov 30, 2019 at 22:51
I carry those spares as well, and yes I tow something and no I am not overweight!
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 08:18

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 08:18
Hi Terry K4,

Like others, I do not have the time to sit through a 20 minute video and write down the list of spares you carry to check if there is something you may have missed. Do you have a written list that you could paste to the post for others to read through? You may get more responses to your question that way, just my opinion, no malice intended.

Macca.
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Reply By: axle - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 10:27

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 10:27
Hi Terry, Haven't looked at the video, not sure if water pump has been mentioned.

As the list looks like it may be growing, you may have to tow something, like a small trailer to carry everything. ..lol.

With the old defender I sometimes think I should tow another one behind lol.

You never ever know what can happen , I had a 4.7l V8 petrol 100s landcruiser that popped a valve spring retaining washer,, Something that had never been heard of before by any engine builder or Toyota dealer in OZ at that particular time. That was my luck...lol
Safe Travels
Cheers Axle.
AnswerID: 628906

Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:16

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:16
Thanks for the feedback and yep, I’ve never heard of a valve spring retainer going in a Tojo either! That’s unlucky
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Reply By: Bob Y. - Qld - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 11:04

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 11:04
On a CSR trip, in Aug this year, I carried a variety of parts, mainly aimed at the 2100km journey north to Halls Ck. Also travelled nearly 7K kms getting there ‘n back.

Took 3 x 2nd hand shocks, 2 Fr & 1 R, that would suit both 79 utes, and front of the chopped 80 series. An new alternator, serpentine belt, king pin bearings, wheel bearings & seals, grease, engine, transmission & diff oils, brake fluid, p/s fluid, various sized cable, s/iron & solder, Loctite(567, 243 & 263), oil filter, numerous fuel filters & an air filter.

What we didn’t have was a wide selection of various nuts, bolts & washers, when the 80’s new canopy attempted to part company from the chassis. Did have some wheel studs & nuts, and a few studs etc for front hub.

Also carried a spare UHF & an aerial, after having to use a handheld on one Madigan journey. Fuses, crimp-on fittings & basic tool kit rounded off the list.

Apart from the aforementioned canopy dramas, repairs to another canopy & 2 staked tyres, we had no mechanical issues over the 19 days on the Canning.

Edit: Terry, I watched the video!

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Member - rocco2010 - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:00

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:00
The Canning will test any loose nuts.
I travelled from Halls Creek to 33 in August and a more experienced member of the group suggested removing my driving lights.
Access is near impossible under the ARB bull bar and protection plate so I said I would wait for them to work loose first. Then they would be easier to remove.
They didn’t budge, including the one that I had fitted a new nut to.
If anything was to fail I would have bet it would be something I had done.
Sometimes you just can’t figure it out.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Gramps - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:15

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:15
Bob Y,

Glad to see someone actually watched the video. Some damn busy people on this forum LOL

Regards
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Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:20

Sunday, Dec 01, 2019 at 12:20
Thanks Bob,
Appreciate the detailed feedback.
I have added a handheld UHF to my bug out bag, cheers.
Glad you watched the vid mate, cheers for your time, greatly appreciated.
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Reply By: Phil G - Monday, Dec 02, 2019 at 08:40

Monday, Dec 02, 2019 at 08:40
Owned a 200series for 6 years so just a couple of comments:
Only use DOT3 brake fluid as recommended.
ATF is most likely needed to top up power steering fluid as the early 200's can crack the lines
Take a lithium jump starter - if you help someone else out, you won't be risking the electronics on your vehicle. Can also double as a 12V power supply.
Only take genuine parts - been caught out too often with parts that don't quite fit. At 130,000km, I'd consider fitting the new belts and hoses before you go. Never buy cheap parts - common Toyota parts are well priced
Make your car corrugation proof (bolts, wiring etc) before you go - check everything that is aftermarket
Need at least one spare front strut and rear shock and spring compressors for the front.
And a prefilter has a nice see-through bowl to check for water or crud.
A scangauge will allow you to reset codes very quickly - I got good at it when a turbo was failing - did it 12 times in an afternoon once! 200series are not very powerful in limp mode!
Scan or get pdf copies of all your vehicle and accessory manuals and load them onto your phone.
And always have a spare key outside the car - maybe with a fellow traveller.
For welding, I also pack a couple of pieces of flat steel and Makita drill and angle grinder with cutting disc
Become familiar with the procedure to top up ATF or bleed coolant - both are not simple
I assume you carry a tyre plug kit
Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 628916

Follow Up By: Terry K4 - Monday, Dec 02, 2019 at 08:44

Monday, Dec 02, 2019 at 08:44
Excellent feedback Phil, thanks for taking the time to respond and share your thoughts.
Cheers
Terry
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Follow Up By: Dave B18 - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2019 at 19:10

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2019 at 19:10
WoW much easier, simpler and cheaper to buy a Mitsubishi Triton to get you there and back. If you need all those parts you have on your list and all the parts Phil G's reply, must be an awfully soft vehicle incapable of purpose. The other reason and oft common problem of vehicle failure is rank stupidity to try and be a hero.
Do you have any weight left for personal items and camping gear?
Would love to see a weigh bridge certificate the day you leave fully loaded with all supplies.
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Reply By: Batt's - Tuesday, Dec 03, 2019 at 05:45

Tuesday, Dec 03, 2019 at 05:45
Didn't watch video but don't get carried away with the amount of spares you think you need or you won't enjoy the trip. Get the basics and know how to use them or just tow a spare vehicle or go with a tour guide in their vehicle.

AnswerID: 628931

Reply By: Ron N - Friday, Dec 06, 2019 at 00:11

Friday, Dec 06, 2019 at 00:11
I had some farmer friends who did a trip up the CSR in '89 (I was supposed to go with them, but had to cancel a month before they left).

One pair of blokes started loading up their traytop HJ75 with everything they thought they might need.
A swag of parts, chains, tools, shovels, crowbars, you name it, they had everything on board but the kitchen sink.
Suddenly, it dawned on them the 'Cruiser was looking pretty low to the ground.
They took it over the local CBH weighbridge and it weighed out at 3500kgs!!

They went home in shock and started cutting back to bare essentials. They still ended up close to 2800kgs.
Then the group set off, and despite all of them reckoning they were carrying spares for every possible likelihood - one of the 'Cruisers in the group broke a steering ball joint! - and no-one in the entire group had a spare!

They had to select one of the party to do a dash to Newman to procure a ball joint, as you can't get far with a broken one!

It's Murphys Law that you could carry half the parts stock of a Toyota dealer with you - and you'd still break something you didn't have!

In all my remote area travels, the most useful, and the most used part of my tools and supplies, was the drawer in my toolbox that held all the little fiddly parts that you always need - but usually don't have.

Things such as small to medium nuts and bolts and studs, a wide range of washers, pipe fittings, adaptors of every type, short lengths of fuel hose of varying diameter, clamps of varying overlapping size, a wide range of various clips, wheel nuts, wheel studs, fuse holders, uni-joint U-bolts, uni-joints, alternator bearings, exhaust clamps, small pieces of thin steel plate, and of course - a selection of lengths of wire of varying gauge.
Naturally, duct tape, electrical tape, silastic and RTV are a permanent part of the toolbox.

Take a long careful look underneath your vehicle, and see what is vulnerable to damage from rocks, sticks and general road debris, and imagine what you'd need to carry to repair any of that, and you'll be pretty right.

P.S. - I did watch your video right through after I wrote the above - it's pretty well done, and you're prepared for just about anything.
The only thing I can add, is that a lot of repair work nowadays often involves specialised tooling or adaptors or pullers - and if you haven't got these with you, for the job you planned to do on the road, you might as well not carry the spare part.

Cheers, Ron.
AnswerID: 628970

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