Ford Ranger

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 13:57
ThreadID: 139615 Views:3290 Replies:13 FollowUps:9
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Hi guys,I am still in the process of finding a car or a ute to pull my [1600] van on a big trip
I will not be going off road . How do you think a 4x2 Ford Ranger ute 2.2 Diesel would go.
Can I have softer shock absorbers fitted to make the ride softer .
thanks guys,
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Reply By: thinkin - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 14:52

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 14:52
A Mazda bt50 4x2 would have the same specs a Ford Ranger for less money, Isuzu D Max 4x2 3liter hi rider would fit the bill also for less money and 6 year warranty. If largish cars can tow 1600kg vans or trailers that size vehicle should. You could try how your combination rides first before worrying about changing shock absorbers.
AnswerID: 629801

Reply By: Member - PhilD_NT - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 15:15

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 15:15
In my experience with a Ranger 4x4 the shocks are already too soft.
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Reply By: Gbc.. - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 15:17

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 15:17
The 2.2 is a bit laggy but IIRC it has very similar final outputs to a 3.0 hilux so towing that sized trailer won’t be an issue.
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Reply By: RMD - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:07

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:07
G'day Chris
A 2.2 ltre will pull the caravan but a 3 litre will do it with less engine stresses being applied to it to make that amount of power. What tows your van or load is Torque not power. Torque = ability do work, power is the rate of doing that work. Of course there has to be both. For a smaller engine to make same torque or power output as a larger engine it has to be more stressed in it's mechanicals and fuel system. Have you noticed VW have gone away from their 2 litre in favour of a much larger engine?

What exactly constitutes a soft ride for you, A Cadillac or a normal car or ute? No one in their right mind would fit softer shocks to any std off road vehicle because they will simply not be able to control the vehicle mass, load mass and caravan, normal and suddenly imposed loads, presented as a moving dynamic mass. Most people want more control and handling ability, not less and a subsequent dangerous suspension action as well. The original when new, in most utes barely caters for ABS and Corrective ESC actions when asked to do so. When worn they become dangerous and not able to do their designed corrective actions. I changed my Dmax shocks at 5000km from new because they did not work as a shock absorber should. Tighter more control and shock ability made a huge difference.Softer and I would have crashed by now.
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:44

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:44
Hi chris a,

A couple of people here may have missed the fact that you are asking about a 4X2, and not a 4X4. That being said, the advice given is still valid. If you put softer shocks particularly in the back, any load you put in/on the back will see the back of the vehicle sag more. This may effect the handling of your vehicle as it may lift the front thus decreasing both your steering & braking ability.

Macca.
Macca.

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AnswerID: 629806

Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 18:50

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 18:50
G’day Macca,
I think you and a lot of people have the misconception that shockers hold the weight up. If they are gassed , they will give a very slight lift, but not Designed for lift, that gas is designed to keep the oil working properly by not foaming . The old air assisted shocks were designed to help lift, don’t know if they are still available.
Shockers control compression and rebound, for handling and comfort.
The springs (and or airbags) are what holds the weight .
Cheers
Shane
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FollowupID: 904914

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 19:07

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 19:07
G'day Shane,
Yep all great information. Now you've done it mentioning airbags! Let the battle begin. :-)

Cheers
Stu
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FollowupID: 904915

Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:29

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:29
Ooh! Shit I should have thought about the ensuing airbag discussion. So easy to get of the OP’s topic!
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 07:23

Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 07:23
Thanks Shane, you are correct, I read shocks, but in my head I thought springs.

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Reply By: Bushranger1 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:56

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 16:56
G'day Chris,
Just to clear things up a bit for you regarding Springs & Shockers.
The Springs carry the weight of the vehicle & depending on the weight carrying capacity of them you will get a harsher ride when rhe vehicle is unladen.
Shock absorbers control the rate the springs compress & rebound. They convert this energy to heat.
Changing Shockers will not alter the ride height as this is not their function.
Cheers
Stu.
AnswerID: 629807

Reply By: axle - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 20:43

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 20:43
Hi Chris

Your biggest worry will be ,the clutch wear if its a manual, When you say 1600 I imagine that's kgs,

unladen or loaded?...… Its a fair bit for a 4x2 when your on a steep hill in a line of traffic and have to stop and take off again, The early DMax had terribly light clutches in them, I actually helped a guy up Victoria pass NSW one time when his clutch was near on fire trying to take off on that hill with a not so large van in tow. most 4x2 diesels are the same in that department. Ive seen many stuffed by 60,000 ks from new!. that's from continuous carrying and towing maximum weight though.

Cheers Axle.
AnswerID: 629811

Follow Up By: Bushranger1 - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:15

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:15
G'day Axle,
Yep Dual mass flywheels. Hopeless for longevity. Mates manual Patrol clutch didnt last long at all towing a horse float. Fine after installation of heavy duty clutch & flywheel. Just a bit more clunky in operation.
Just google "Dual Mass Flywheel & you will hear some horror stories.
Cheers
Stu
3
FollowupID: 904918

Reply By: eaglefree - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:32

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:32
“Won’t be going off road” meaning? Remaining on bitumen roads? If so take your pick of any 2wd car that takes your fancy even common Holden Commodores or Falcons or similar that has the towing capacity.
If you mean many dirt roads then if it rains they become muddy roads and choose accordingly.

But I assume all bitumen roads. A mere couple of decades ago stock sedans were common tow cars but the trend is now imo bone rattling utes for reasons that escape me , for bitumen only towing around the ATM you’re talking about. A common falcon can tow up to 2300kg with a nice ride
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Reply By: swampy - Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:41

Thursday, Jan 30, 2020 at 21:41
Hi
Commonly accepted the larger engine 3.ltr early Ranger and the 3.2 ltr of later Ranger are far more competent at towing than the smaller 2.2 or 2.5 .
The 2 smaller engine will consume almost as much fuel if not more with a lot more gear changes towing the same weight. This has been the case since engines were invented . A smaller single turbo will work harder to achieve the same result as the larger.
Big fat torque band starting early in the RPM and lasting thru the mid range = less gear changes
Very late models are bit different .
No trucks use a very small engines .

Nobody wants the small engines anyways --think resale .
Looked at a VW V6 TD costly
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Reply By: Variform - Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 12:38

Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 12:38
You should check out Isuzu D Max 4x2 3L. That should fit your needs.
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Follow Up By: thinkin - Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 18:46

Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 18:46
It's already been suggested, first reply.
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Follow Up By: Ron N - Saturday, Feb 01, 2020 at 18:26

Saturday, Feb 01, 2020 at 18:26
One of the problems with the 4x2 models as compared to their 4x4 brothers, is that the 4x2's often have smaller diameter wheels - and therefore, smaller diameter brakes - resulting in reduced braking capabilities over the 4x4's.

I know this to be true for the 4x2 Isuzu D-Max and the 4x2 Hilux - but it appears the Ranger may use the same size brake discs all through their 4x2 and 4x4 range.

However, it's difficult to find out from Ford specification charts, because they refuse to provide that information.
But I have picked up from brake rotor sellers that the 4x2 and 4x4 Rangers use the same disc rotor.

You can generally pick up from the rated towing capacity whether the vehicle has bigger brakes. Heavier towing capacities, such as 3000 to 3500kg, indicates bigger brakes fitted.

Cheers, Ron.
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FollowupID: 904975

Follow Up By: thinkin - Sunday, Feb 02, 2020 at 09:32

Sunday, Feb 02, 2020 at 09:32
That is why the model "hi rider" was suggested in the first reply as opposed to choice of low rider models. The choice of High Rider and low Rider models are available in the 2.2lFord Ranger and Mazda bt50 and Isuzu D-MAX
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Follow Up By: 9900Eagle - Sunday, Feb 02, 2020 at 10:45

Sunday, Feb 02, 2020 at 10:45
thinking, the 3.2 High rider 4x2 manuals have a single mass flywheel and depending on the model come with a diff lock. They might all come with the diff lock now as standard bt I am not sure.

For towing think about the auto.
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FollowupID: 904993

Reply By: Sigmund - Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 21:16

Friday, Jan 31, 2020 at 21:16
Dampers help control the rate at which the springs extend and compress, and stiffness/sag is mainly a matter of the spring rate. If you want the springs to compress more readily for that soft ride it'll also sag more and won't perform properly while towing.
At the rear a correctly designed leaf helper airbag that you air up when loaded and down when not, helps deal with the gap - but get this done by a suspension pro, not with a kit off ebay.
AnswerID: 629836

Reply By: Travelling - Saturday, Feb 01, 2020 at 16:12

Saturday, Feb 01, 2020 at 16:12
Why not look at LDV. Get a 4x4 with all the features, and low range when you want to manoeuvre the caravan into that tight spot or go down that gravel road to a free camp. We own 2 on the property been faultless and work hard.
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Reply By: Don H7 - Thursday, Feb 13, 2020 at 17:03

Thursday, Feb 13, 2020 at 17:03
I heard the Ranger autos had some major issues. Probably sorted by now but I suggest deep research before committing.
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