Pick this Mount

Submitted: Saturday, Jul 11, 2020 at 20:47
ThreadID: 140233 Views:2041 Replies:13 FollowUps:29
Here's looking yonder west;

From which Mount?



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In whatever comes our way.

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Reply By: Member - Boobook - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 06:35

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 06:35
Not a mountain but it looks like the view west from Point Lilian on the Connie Sue.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:39

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:39
Hi Tony,

Not Point Lilian.

This one is probably not officially a Mountain either, it is just called one. Mount _________
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Reply By: Member - sparra - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:32

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:32
Mount Worsnop?
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:39

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 09:39
Not Mount Worsnop Sparra
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Reply By: Member BarryG - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 10:12

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 10:12
Mount Beadell?
Barry
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Follow Up By: equinox - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 10:54

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 10:54
No Barry, not Mount Beadell - This one is not in the Gibson Desert
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Reply By: equinox - Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 15:02

Sunday, Jul 12, 2020 at 15:02
This feature has its very own 250k mapsheet named after it.

It is in WA.

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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 05:12

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 05:12
Mt Cornish
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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 08:43

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 08:43
No, but that's the closest so far...
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 10:50

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 10:50
It reminds me of the views near the Balgo airstrip but there isn't a mount there. Balgo Hill
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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:20

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:20
Looks a bit like Balgo Phil.
John's got the answer below - Mount Bannerman - I think you may have been there :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - sparra - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 14:51

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 14:51
Gee,I should have picked that,stood up there in 2005,...then to Shiddi Pool,also climbed Mt Cornish.
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Reply By: Member - Jim S1 - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 09:18

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 09:18
Blackdown Tableland area?

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Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 09:41

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 09:41
Mount Bannerman.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:14

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:14
That is correct John, well done.

A place that's not that difficult too get to, but I imagine would not be visited that often due to it's anonymity.
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Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:51

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 11:51
Another place with a view.

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Follow Up By: equinox - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 12:20

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 12:20
Judging by the colour of the sand, and the way the pole is standing - I'd say the place would have to named after a geologist!!!!

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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 13:09

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 13:09
Equinox is right, the place was named after a geologist.

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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 20:38

Monday, Jul 13, 2020 at 20:38
The explorer who named this place described it as ‘a prominent and conspicuous white sandhill 1,150’ above sea level. A good guide to the soakage’ .

The soakage had saved the lives of an earlier explorer and his men.

These trees are common in the area. They are characteristic of a particular desert.

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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 09:08

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 09:08
The soakage and the desert were both named after the same individual.



The soakage was almost dry when I visited but it was full when the explorer arrived. He called it a spring.
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 10:10

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 10:10
Is it in the Gibson desert?
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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 11:03

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 11:03
No Frank, it is not in the Gibson desert.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 12:34

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 12:34
Next hit........the Explorer was lucky not to die during his exploration expedition and names the desert after his Queen.......
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Follow Up By: greybeard - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 12:58

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 12:58
The Kinks ;)
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:04

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:04
Great Victoria Desert, but where? I have no idea.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:14

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:14
It’s easy Frank, do you want me to tell you who the Explorer was and what he called this life saver?
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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:20

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:20
Ernest Giles for the explorer and I'll take a stab at Victoria Springs or Queen Victoria Springs for the lifesaver.
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:23

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 15:23
I should have also said, the spring is also named after that Queen......

It was found and discovered in September 1875 by Explorer ...........

Next hint? Do you have any of Mark Shepherd’s books?

If you do, the place is shown with water in it on page.......


You probably think I am a real tease by now......lol
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Follow Up By: equinox - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 18:04

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 18:04
Hey guys, you are getting off track I think haha

The question was about the place with the post and the yellow sand.

What is it called?
Who named it?

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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:31

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:31
It’s called a cement post, or a winching anchor
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 14:27

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 14:27
I think this photo is in the The little Desert National Park Victoria.
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Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:18

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:18
Frank is getting there with some help from Stephen.

In September 1875 Ernest Giles arrived at a small lake ‘150 yards in circumference and from two to three feet deep’ and called itQueen Victoria Spring. It was the first water his party had found in 17 days.

He also named the desert he was crossing the Great Victoria Desert. It is the largest desert in Australia. The tree pictured above is a Marble Gum and is unique to this desert.

A later explorer had difficulty locating the spring and climbed the prominent white sandhill.

There is a commemorative plaque on the post on top of the sandhill.

All of these features are in Western Australia.


So all we need now are the names of this later explorer and the sandhill.

Cheers, John
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Follow Up By: Member - Stephen L (Clare SA) - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:29

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:29
Do I get a bonus prize John for helping out.....lol
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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:40

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:40
Your bonus prize is the honour of writing a description for this place in ExplorOzPlaces..... lol

Cheers, John
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Follow Up By: Member - Jim S1 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:47

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:47
Strewth ........ are we there yet ??? lol !!

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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:52

Tuesday, Jul 14, 2020 at 20:52
No Jim, but at least we are back at the beginning.

Cheers, John

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Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 09:34

Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 09:34
The Elder Scientific Exploring Expedition reached Queen Victoria Spring in September 1891. They had travelled 375 miles in 23 days without finding water, the ‘biggest journey on record without water’ . The leader reported he was ‘greatly disappointed’ to find ‘the spring had dried up’ - ‘alas for us, the magnificent spring, which we had come 400 miles to find, had ceased to exist, for no water was visible’ .

The leader named the prominent sandhill after the expedition’s geologist.



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Reply By: Member BarryG - Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 10:33

Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 10:33
OK, I think I've found it - Streich Mound?
Named after Victor Streich.

Barry
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Follow Up By: Member - JOHN C16 - Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 11:33

Wednesday, Jul 15, 2020 at 11:33
Bingo Barry. The expedition leader was David Lindsay, the geologist Victor Streich and the sandhill Streich Mound.



A bonus question for history enthusiasts. Another explorer visited the spring 6 months before David Lindsay and found water. What was his name ?

Cheers, John
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Reply By: JoshHill - Thursday, Jul 16, 2020 at 14:52

Thursday, Jul 16, 2020 at 14:52
That's a wonderful and wide playground!
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Reply By: Member - JOHN C16 - Thursday, Jul 16, 2020 at 22:37

Thursday, Jul 16, 2020 at 22:37
Fred Newman, a Swedish prospector and explorer, reached Queen Victoria Spring 6 months before the Elder expedition. He sent a report of his trip to David Lindsay. He described the water as a soakage about 12 feet square. He also made an intriguing observation. ‘Newman saw great numbers of natives there. They made no secret of being cannibals’ .

Here is the relevant page written by David Lindsay:

Queen Victoria Spring is dried up

Cheers, John
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