De La Poer Range Nature Reserve

Submitted: Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 17:59
ThreadID: 140782 Views:844 Replies:6 FollowUps:8
Hello Brains Trust,
Just wondering if anyone knows how this nature reserve got it's name? I've Googled till I've gone crossed eyed and I can't find anything online as why/how it was named.

Anyone out there know?

Thanks.
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:21

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:21
I wonder if it's named after Brian De La Poer Beresford who was temporary Major in the 30th Australian Infantry Brigade in the Australian army in WW11 - died in active duty in Paupa New Guinea in 1942.

https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/R1683934
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Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Michelle - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:26

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:26
Or maybe its William del la Poer Beresford - because he was in WA - ex convict transported from York/England in 1855 for forgery and ended up living in York WA was even noted for being a sandalwood cutter. Apparently, he was quite the character and his namesake lived on beyond his life.

see William De la Poer Beresford
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:29

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 18:29
Thanks Michelle, I'll look into those references.
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Reply By: equinox - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 19:05

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 19:05
I'd say it got its name from the nearby range of the same name.

De La Poer Range was named after Donald John De La Poer Beresford (1852-1886) by Samuel Grau Hubbe in 1896.
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:25

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:25
yep got the range reference, just wondering where that name came from as I didn't recognise the name as an early day explorer, thanks heaps for that info, now I can look into it.
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Reply By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 19:14

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 19:14
It was named from the Hubbe South Australia to Western Australia Stock Route Expedition from 1895 - 1896, of which my Great Grandfather was a member of the exploration team.

I gave full details to the Western Australian National Parks years ago, and the Hubbe team were the first ever white people through that area.

I would have to go back through the journal and would take some time, so if you need further details, please let me know
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Follow Up By: Austag - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:26

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:26
Oh wow, never heard of that Expedition before, thanks Stephen, much appreciated for the info!
So have you ever explored that area being it's in the family?
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Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:55

Tuesday, Nov 24, 2020 at 22:55
We have been close a couple of times and the time we did plan to go there it was wet, so that fell into a big heap.

I will go through all my papers and find out why it was named.

What I can remember about that area when they were exploring it, their previous aboriginal guides had left them as it was not their country and in that particular area, they feared being attacked by local aboriginals, and they had no camp fire and had 2 men on guard duty all night.....remembering that there were only 4 men in the party.

When I spoke to local Rangers from Kalgoorlie, they did not know how the area was named, so I copied the related paged of the journal and sent it to them for their reference.
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Reply By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 06:16

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 06:16
From official records, The range was named by
S.G. Hubbe 1896, Exploration Journal p.41, Roll Plan 96. Named on 20 May 1896 after the late Donald John de la Poer Beresford, Clerk to the South Australian Parliament. This small range is situated some 25 kilometres SW of the western extremities of Lake Wells.

The nature reserve Reserve No. 41831 is situated about 140km NW of Laverton Townsite. Name proposed by the Department of Conservation and Land Management after the range this reserve contains. Approved 27/9/1996.

Hubbe book
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Follow Up By: Austag - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 09:40

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 09:40
Thanks Phil, much appreciated.

When did you head out there? Great photos.

I'm looking at visiting and exploration the reserve next year.
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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 21:17

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 21:17
I've been there many times over the last 20 years. I've usually been on the way to other places to the east.
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Follow Up By: equinox - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 21:32

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 21:32
I'd like to go there to.
P Muir was poking around there in the '70's be nice to find some of his marks and gnammas.

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Follow Up By: Austag - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 22:38

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 22:38
Equinox, yes now that I've got this info, I look forward to doing some research and see what we can find from back.
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Reply By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 17:34

Wednesday, Nov 25, 2020 at 17:34
Austag

I have found the journal and here is what was recorded at the time.

In reference of self, this refers to Hubbe.

The aim of the exploration survey was to find a stock route from South Australia (Oodnadatta) through to the goldfields and Coolgardie in Western Australia, for getting cattle for human consumption in the state.

Wednesday, May 20th 1896 - Camp No 85, Bar., 9am 28.72; attached ther., 50° Self and Langman proceeded to a spot fifteen chains N.E. of our camp, where yesterday I had noted what might prove to be good soakage in rich black soil on inundated country clear of and distinct from the main channel and 90 yards distant. Here we sank a hole through alluvium, alternate bands of light clay and sand, to a depth of 46 inches, when water gushed in rapidly, bringing in a quantity of fine floury drift sand, the principal supply of water coming in from the side furthest from the creek bed; the water on being tested was perfectly fresh. Had time and my instructions permitted, should have deepened and timbered this hole to test the supply, but as I am instructed to sink no permanent wells in Western Australian territory unless water is required for the party, which here in not the case, and a shaft would require close timber to get down even a few feet in such moveable country, work was discontinued. From present development I am satisfied that unless the lower strata changes rapidly, a permanent supply of excellent water is obtainable, as salt in not noticeable in the water or on the surface, where a limited quantity of very fine white deposit, whichI cannot identify, on rich black loam, is the only chemical in the neighbourhood. I have named the range in which this creek rises the De la Poer, after the late Donald John De la Poer Beresford, clerk of the South Australian Parliament; and the creek, the Moxon, after Mr. William Moxon Cook, sporting editor of The Australasian, Melbourne, Victoria.

Thursday, May 21st 1896 - Camp 85, Bar 9am; 28.70; attached ther.,50°. Remained at Moxon Creek, recruiting camels……………….


Hope this helps you out
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