Sturt Trip

Submitted: Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:04
ThreadID: 140854 Views:2013 Replies:8 FollowUps:5
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I've just begun to plan a trip following Sturt's trip into Central Australia.

I don't know what's able to be seen, but I'd like to take a look at Depot Glen, any blazed trees and so on.

I'm just wondering if anyone knows if there is a modern day map that displays this trip? I can find lots of old maps on Google but nothing newish.

Thanks.
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:10

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:10
Does not answer your question, but I reckon this site would have a free download of Sturt's original logs.
https://www.gutenberg.org/
Cheers,
Peter
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:21

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:21
Aust Outback Tracks 1M fromWestprint Maps has approximate routes taken by early explorers, including Sturt. Apart from that, I find it an excellent map to give the big picture while touring.

I don't know if it's available as a paper map, but it is in digital, but only in OziExplorer format (.ozf4). It has excellent notes and IIRC you get a collection of additional PDF notes about places, tracks and explorers.

Here's a partial screenshot of the NW corner of NSW. The buff-coloured line is Sturts approximate path. The grey one is Burke & Wills.

FrankP

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Reply By: Siringo - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:32

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 14:32
Thank you both for your help. I'll look into the suggestions.
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Reply By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 17:05

Wednesday, Dec 09, 2020 at 17:05
Are you planning on visiting Annandale ruins west of Birdsville?

This is the area where Sturt turned around and did not venture further into the Simpson. It was very fortunate that the party did retrace their steps, or it would have been a case of an explorer never being heard of again
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Reply By: Member - OzJourney - Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 08:32

Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 08:32
I visited the site last year, the original emblazed tree with the date is still there 1845, where his 2nd in command James Poole lies buried, that makes this Acacia tree well over 170 years old, for it would have been a mature tree when the date was carved so over 200 years old. It was in seed as well.

Make sure who have a copy of Sturt's diary.
It's easy to find and well sign posted, we just used a Hema map book of AU.


Steve
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 09:43

Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 09:43
Still there 2 weeks ago. The tree looks older than me. :-)
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Tuesday, Dec 29, 2020 at 15:47

Tuesday, Dec 29, 2020 at 15:47
I have visited a few times and recall it's a beefwood - Grevillea striata - tree.
Not trying to be picky but grevilleas come in many shapes & sizes, just like acacias.
Cheers
Rick
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Follow Up By: Member - OzJourney - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 08:18

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 08:18
Thanks Rick, that actually makes a lot more sense, I always thought Acacias were a short lived plant species and was surprised to see such an old example.
You can bet that Sturt would have chosen the Beefwood to carve knowing that it would last a long time.
So my question now is, given that Sturt party was camped there for months, and starving, surrounded by Grevillea striata, did they think up the name Beefwood ?
Steve
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Follow Up By: Rick (S.A.) - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 11:40

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 11:40
It's my understanding that the name refers to the similarity of a cross section of heartwood resembling a piece of beef. It certainly looks so to my eye. Sturt recorded it in 1845, but I have discovered that the species was first formally described by botanist Robert Brown (who was botanist with M Flinders in circa 1801-02 and remaining in Aus until 1805. I have read - dunno where - that Brown collected approx 4,000 Australian botanical specimens!) in1810.

Cheers
Rick
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 12:33

Wednesday, Dec 30, 2020 at 12:33
Hello Rick, been a while!

I’d agree with Rick, about the common name, Beefwood. If you can find a tree with a large girth, they make an ideal chopping block, for a station meat house. Have seen many used as house stumps too. After many years, say 60-70, they tend to rot off below ground level in red soil. Not sure how they last in black soil?

Bob

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Can't remember most of it.

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Reply By: Siringo - Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 16:09

Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 16:09
Thanks everyone for the help.

We won't be going to Annandale, we went there in 2018 & photographed the small sign there marking Sturts presence at that point.
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Reply By: dad1340 - Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 17:24

Thursday, Dec 10, 2020 at 17:24
I'm out there next June and as usual research and planning is all part of the fun for us.
This forum has been invaluable in providing information from the well travelled and Michelle from admin. Start looking for the post. Map and all.
The run south is 2WD, caravans the lot ................ in the dry. Personally some ground clearance and two diffs are always good for unpredictable country.

My first move was to get a book on Sturt's Expedition. If your into history and trip knowledge; get this;

"To the Inland Sea
Charles Sturt's Expedition 1844-45"
by Edward Stokes.

Cheers
Livin' thar dream

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Reply By: Member - DOZER - Saturday, Dec 26, 2020 at 16:34

Saturday, Dec 26, 2020 at 16:34
Thoroughly recommend stopping at Tibboburra NP office in the main street. They have a physical re-enactment of the party, including horses and horsemen, bullock teams and sheep. You quickly see why the indigenous threw spears at them. They would have trampled a 1km wide path through the bush, and drank all the water in creeks.
b4 you bag me out, walk a mile in my shoes, then your a mile away and have my shoes :)

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