Fraser Island to become "K'gari"

Fraser Island name is to officially become "K'gari". .... ABC News link here.
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Reply By: Member -Pinko (NSW) - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 12:57

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 12:57
I give up?
Living is a journey,it depends on where you go !
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Reply By: Member - Jim S1 - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 13:11

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 13:11
"K'gari, pronounced "Gurri", means paradise, and is what the Butchulla people have always called the island, derived from its Dreamtime creation story."

Apparently.

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Reply By: Gronk - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 13:57

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 13:57
Ayres Rock supposedly changed names too, but I’ll always call it Ayres Rock.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 22:35

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 22:35
Agree, I'm outraged too. I told them renaming Van Diemens Land would lead to no good. Howza bloke sapposed to rememba how to spell Uluru? Ayers Rock is much simpler. Bring back pounds, shillings and pence, feet and inches, and pounds (what the?) and ounces I say. And the lash. And leg irons. Next you know the bloody woke crowd will want to give women the vote and outlaw child labour and slavery. Is nothing sacred in New Holland these days?
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:18

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:18
Perhaps we should consult Guru Bruce Pascoe on this subject.
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:04

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:04
Any embellishment Pascoe may have made in Dark Emu is still light years away from the officially-sanctioned, straight-jacketed (appropriately coloured) garbage we were taught - and more to the point NOT taught - at school Dave. Thankfully due to a whole range of people ("woke" acivitists, anthropological and historical experts, etc) we are now far better informed as to our actual history and the appalling mistreatment of our indigenous peoples. Knowledge is a great thing - especially if we're willing to learn from it. World history shows that plenty aren't.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 13:04

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 13:04
Embellishment Bazooka ! Even "our" ABC has given up on this one. :)
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 00:53

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 00:53
Apparently not David:
The Dark Emu Debate 50 minutes.

Haven't listened to it yet myself but I will. Irrespective, as far as fantasy goes Pascoe's attempt to counter the hunter-gatherer epithet used by right wing extremists is light years behind the perpetrators of the official Australian history taught to children back in my school days.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 09:31

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 09:31
Peter Sutton , Keryn Walsh and Warraimaay historian, Professor Victoria Grieve right wing extremists.
Think I will wait for the TV series. :)
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 10:35

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 10:35
Strange comment. I listened to it. The discussion wasn't as challenging or wide ranging as I'd hoped, especially in regard to the rw 'backward race' narrative Pascoe was attempting to counter, but it did enough to convince me that the 'old people' were highly unlikely to have been agriculturalists in our sense of the word, despite Pascoe's views. Prof Grieve - an aboriginal woman - probably summed it up when she said Bruce Pascoe is not an historian, he's a creative writer. Peter Sutton didn't say as much but it was obvious that he didn't have a high regard for Pascoe's knowledge of Australian anthropology and languages, hence the rebuttal book obviously.
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Reply By: Member - David M (SA) - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 14:38

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 14:38
Any idea of the proposed camping fee changes Allan.
David.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 15:45

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 15:45
.
No idea David.
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Allan

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Reply By: nick g1 - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 20:35

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 20:35
The usual pandering to the P C digie brigade. I for one will not do it!
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 23:37

Tuesday, Sep 21, 2021 at 23:37
I'm not worried what they call it. In another thousand years it might have a different name again and I won't be worrying about it then either. What's Chinese for K'gari?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 07:50

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 07:50
.
...........Tiantáng........
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Follow Up By: Member - Outback Gazz - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 08:37

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 08:37
And you can guarantee the Chinese won't bend over backwards to give the indigenous community everything they want !
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:53

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:53
Recent history especially says they'd do the opposite just as our history shows than none of our governments have done what you appear to be suggesting Gazz. Perception is often far from reality.
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 08:02

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 08:02
Just like when people say "greens" are closing down tracks, when in fact it's the people who have to pay the maintenance, clean up fees and insurance who close the tracks. Perception and spin versus reality.
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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 08:44

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 08:44
Speaking personally, I don’t have a problem with reverting back to indigenous names where appropriate, particularly for significant landmarks. Some names I difficulty pronouncing, perhaps some could be “anglicised” to make it easier to pronounce. No disrespect intended to our indigenous people, but what difference does it make to spell something with a double “n”, or “dj” when the pronunciation doesn’t sound like that. As an example “Djerriwarrh” the “d” is silent, as is the “h”, there are many more that are similar. It is bad enough in English when “gh” is pronounced “f”, and doubt when the “b” is silent.

Perhaps our whole language needs to be simplified, after all, we no longer use the words, thou or shall’t. The King James Version of the bible has been updated to a New English Translation.

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Follow Up By: Gronk - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 09:00

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 09:00
I don’t have a problem with it, but is it being done to appease some minority for a feel good token or is it a push for wide spread name changing ?
Do they change the name for a whole range of places ?
Do they want to change the name of every 2nd town in the country ?
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Follow Up By: Nifty1 - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:08

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 10:08
It’s something I never understood, this highly complicated spelling of Aboriginal words that sound simple. Obviously invented by white men but what on earth did they think they were hearing? Does anyone have a linguistics background and can explain it? Like why Ambladdawich is spelt Ampilatwatcha?
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Follow Up By: Michael H9 - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:10

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:10
I would hope that they will only change the names of significant places that have been here forever and had names before we arrived back to the original names. I don't have a problem with that.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:19

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 11:19
.
The "gh" is there for a purpose. Otherwise you may write.... "I keep coffin. I have a sore throat". LOL
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Follow Up By: Member - Jack - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 14:26

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 14:26
As the original inhabitants did not have an alphabet I am interested to know how they conjured up these weird spellings for some of their places. Revenge??? Can we blame Daisy Bates???
Jack
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 14:56

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 14:56
.
Jack,

The "original inhabitants" did not create these "weird spellings".
The Aboriginal people did not have a written language and relied on verbal and some graphics for communication.

The names referred to here were created by linguists endeavouring to replicate the word sounds used by the Aboriginals. The difficulty we find in pronouncing them is because we are not experienced in vocalising some of those sounds. So now the problem arises that we neither express the word as originally used and in fact often cannot get our tongue around the spelling used. These words produced by the linguists are idealised and it would be far better if words that mimic the original sound but were spelled in an anglicised manner were created. That then would be more acceptable to the non-Aboriginal population whilst still recognising the Aboriginal identity of the geographic locations.

So if Fraser is to become "Gurri", then spell it "Gurri".






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Allan

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Follow Up By: Gronk - Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 20:00

Wednesday, Sep 22, 2021 at 20:00
So if Fraser is to become "Gurri", then spell it "Gurri".

Can’t argue with that !!
With the other names, 90% of people don’t know how to pronounce them.
If it hadn’t been mentioned here, I may never have known the “proper” way to pronounce K’gari.

The Olgas……don’t know the “proper” way of saying Kata Tjuta..??
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Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 17:07

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 17:07
And then there’s town where I grew up
Wudinna
Kyancutta
Koongawa
Pygery
Waramboo
Etc.
Where did they come from.
And they get pronounced differently by the non locals.

My opinion on the renaming of places with indigenous names is pandering to the minority! And yeah someone needs to spell like it sounds, but then it’ll still get pronounced differently.
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 23:18

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 23:18
Kata Tjuta (catta-jew-tah) – many heads
https://parksaustralia.gov.au/uluru/discover/culture/language/

No doubt a handful of name changes are an enormous burden for the hard done by majority to bear. I recall the cries of dismay when the Z was added to the spelling of our highest mountain. Imagine the consternation if the kids of the same people were taught how to pronounce the bloke's name "correctly" in school.
"Dad, guess what we learned at school today!"
"I don't care if it was named after a Polish hero or an Afghan camel trader. I tell yas - it's kozzy-bloody-osko, always was and always will be".
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Reply By: Banjo (WA) - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 08:04

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 08:04
Easy to 'rewrite' history when the original inhabitants didn't have the whatever it takes to create a written language.

Just make up a story and the woke crowd will bend over backwards to stuff even more money into your bank account.
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Reply By: Stefandsal - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 09:16

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 09:16
I suppose people will just call it what they like, or what they are used to.

Robert is sometimes Bob, but he will always be Robert.

Fraser isn't changing to K'gari, it always was.

Bob is just officially being recognised as Robert I guess.

Some will respect that & call him Robert.

Others will respect that & still call him Bob.

Some won't ever respect Bob or Robert.
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Follow Up By: Member - shane r1 - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 17:09

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 17:09
Well put!
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 23:39

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 23:39
Yep, both precise and subtle. You're not a teacher by chance? My second guess is a programmer with a philosophical bent .

You've just summed up the Explorz forum to a tee.

Btw is that Stef and Sal or Stefan Dsal? :-) (Don't blame me, blame covid lockdown).
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Follow Up By: Stefandsal - Friday, Sep 24, 2021 at 14:34

Friday, Sep 24, 2021 at 14:34
Haha...a teacher I am not...well, perhaps a teacher of sorts. Not a programmer either. AlthoughI am trying to program my children correctly! Thank you for the compliment though if that's what it was.

No, just someone who has had quite a career struggling to remain objective to sort out other people's dramas.

Sometimes I got it wrong, sometimes I did ok. But I did learn that there are always more than 3 sides to a 2 sided story.

Philosophical. Yes. I always live in hope.

2 people. Stef & Sal.


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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Saturday, Sep 25, 2021 at 09:53

Saturday, Sep 25, 2021 at 09:53
It was indeed a sincere compliment S&S. Your post was beautiful in its simplicity and with a strong lesson for those willing to listen. Your kids are off to a good start, a big advantage in life - sadly many kids don't have that experience, for a whole range of reasons. Something also worth contemplating before we point our privileged fingers.
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Reply By: RMD - Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 13:45

Thursday, Sep 23, 2021 at 13:45
It is hard to understand the meanings from different areas of Aboriginal Australia.
On Fraser, "K'Gari" means Paradise apparently, maybe that is true , it is a nice place or was, until the park people egos let it burn.
Not sure how the K'Gari means paradise, What does K mean? when in Victoria, "Gari" means pointed as in mountain, and so "Gariwerd" is the Grampians. No mention of what "Werd" means though. it seems it is made up or accepted and the same word name can be different in other places. No mountains of Fraser! If you google WERD it changes it to weed and the info comes up as traditional people smoking pot etc . Not sure if that affects the naming of places or perception of. That stuff certainly affects any folk.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Friday, Sep 24, 2021 at 08:21

Friday, Sep 24, 2021 at 08:21
RMD,

Don’t forget that indigenous Australia is made up of hundreds of separate “tribes”, all with their own unique languages or dialects. So one word in one area of Australia may have a totally different meaning in another.

Even in “English” “Laverton” is pronounced differently in Victoria than it is in Western Australia.

Macca.
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