Impact Drivers for Wheel Nuts

Submitted: Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 14:41
ThreadID: 142677 Views:1969 Replies:21 FollowUps:33
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Putting tools together for the new vehicle and I got to dreaming about using a cordless impact driver for wheel nuts. In the past I carried a breaker bar and torque wrench for the job, but maybe......??

I had believed that these things would have an adjustable torque setting to suit the vehicle manufacturer's specs, well at least the better drivers anyway. But no, none of them do. And finding one with a maximum torque capability to suit those specs proved impossible. they either fell short or went well over. Further reading of "scholarly" web articles indicated that some degree of torque limitation could be achieved by "lifting the finger" at the right moment. Certainly, that seems to be what the tyre dealers do. But the uncertainty of achieving any degree of torque accuracy by this method seemed to likely compromise the end result that I sought.
Now I know that you can purchase torque limiting devices to attach between the driver and the nut socket but the tyre dealers are unlikely to use that due to the wide range of torque settings required in the daily grind. And I am still bruised by a tyre fitter handing me a broken stud from the Aurion, saying "It musta been weak mate".

Also I needed to consider the requirement to carry a battery charger for the thing. And even worse, that would need to operate from the vehicle 12vdc. I was of a mind to obtain a 12v driver skin and substitute the battery with a long cable and Anderson plug, but sufficient torque (240Nm) was out of the reach of almost all 12v models.

Ahhhh, It all got too hard so I abandoned the idea and decided to stick to the old torque wrench. After all, I reasoned that in many years of travel I have only needed to replace a wheel very few times What on earth was I thinking anyway?

But having spent several hours on this I wondered what others are doing. Especially those who found the solution of a nut driver to be their solution. I'm over it but it did fill a 'Covid morning' on a public holiday. My interest is now only philosophical!

So c'mon chaps...... give us your best argument for carrying an impact driver.


Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: BV - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:08

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:08
I had a 12v impact driver until it self destructed! While it lasted it was good for loosening wheel nuts and doing an initial tighten, but the final tighten had to be done by hand.
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Reply By: Zippo - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:22

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:22
Allan, I mused the same and investigated as you did. I am definitely of the torque wrench camp, but don't carry it on our trips.

The quality torque-limiting adapters are apparently quite good - they'd want to be for the price. My preferred supplier/fitter of tyres (a Bob Jane franchise) DO use a torque wrench, I have witnessed it through the waiting room window more than once. Even my independent service shop do likewise.

Having a fine pitch stud (12x1.25) is probably more likely to shear under excessive torque. At home when fitting the A/T set I do use the rattle gun to tighten, but its lowest grunt setting is below 60lb-ft which is my first wrench setting for finishing the job.

Knowing how much grunt is required on the torque wrench to reach the final setting does lend itself to the calibrated-elbow argument that "rough enough is good enough" for roadside situations. Some will argue endlessly about the imperative of spot-on torque, but they are probably still stuck in the bush waiting for roadside assistance to rock up.

And to the most imporatant questions - do roadside assistance agents actually use a torque wrench? Has anyone witnessed that?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:51

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:51
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Yes Zippo, grunt on the torque wrench is some concern. My wrench is set at 115ft/lbs for the Troopy and it needed a fair pull but the Sprinter calls for 177ft/lbs. I'm not even sure the wrench goes that high!
There I go.... justifying a rattle gun!!

DISCLAIMER: I know it's lbs/ft not ft/lbs but I find footpounds easier to say.
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Zippo - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:22

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:22
No Allan you (of all people) should realise it is LB-FT. Lb/ft is dimensioned as mass per unit length. Consider yourself reprimanded ;-)
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:45

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:45
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I know Zippo, I know. It always was "foot pounds" . The Yanks probably still call it that.
But I'm getting too old to countenance change..... including "Fraser Island". (If that starts an off-topic splinter I'll ignore that too)
But I can accept Nm because it never was mN. lol
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - William B - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 16:55

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 16:55
Having been a road side service provider in NSW for over 30 years ,(only recently retired), I never used a torque wrench.
I never had a complaint against me for over tightening.
But I am old school and always did the final tightening by hand.
William
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Reply By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:22

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:22
I use a Milwaukie 18V impact driver on the OKA (8 studs per wheel @ 5/8"UNF).
It does have 3 (?) adjustable torque settings and I use one that "gets it under, but close".
I still finish with a torque wrench, even in the bush.

I carry the battery charger as I also carry a drill, a grease gun, an angle grinder and a sabre saw. :)
You can see why we weigh 6T !!!
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:39

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:39
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Peter, An angle grinder and a sabre saw? Do you just cut bits off and leave them behind?
The Milwaukee came closest in my search but the 18v put me off.
In any case, I think the back of my mind was saying "You don't need this!)

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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:03

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:03
We carried a chain saw for a while, but the sabre saw is more versatile. We don't cut fire wood and rarely have a fire.
You are right. You don't need it. It really does not matter if changing a wheel takes 10 minutes or half an hour.
Cheers,
Peter
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Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 22:56

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 22:56
Peter.
6 ton! I reckon you take far too much grease.
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Follow Up By: Peter_n_Margaret - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 09:51

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 09:51
On our 20,000km trip this year I did 3 lubes and an oil change on the road. :)
Cheers,
Peter
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Reply By: Member - LeighW - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:29

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 15:29
I use a Makita impact driver to remove the wheel nuts and spin them back on then tension with a tension wrench. Driver is quite handy when you find your mechanic has got a bit over exuberant doing them up.

I choose the Makita as I already had a Makita electric drill and chainsaw skins, just swap the batteries between them.

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Reply By: axle - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:16

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:16
G/Day Allan, Move up to 3/4' drive black impact sockets, 3/4 breaker bar and a length of alloy pipe.

When your elbow clicks thats your torque. :)))))).


Cheers Axle.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:36

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 16:36
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Axle, can you suggest the length and size of the pipe? lol

I just took a look at my torque wrench. It has a maximum setting of 150ft/lb and I need 177.
Even if it could be set to 177 it would take 150% more pull than before and that was not insignificant.
A rattle gun is again looking attractive but maybe I should be looking in 'Shipbuilding Tools'.
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Allan

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Reply By: Daniel G3 - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 17:25

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 17:25
Allan
The Milwaukee 18 volt gear is bloody good it has a 5 year warranty and you can set it to different settings I think the accuracy is about 3%. If you purchase the version with a 1/2 drive you can fit an adapter to turn it into a 1/4 hex drive to take screwdriver tips.
They also supply a 12 volt to 18 volt charger which simply chargers from a ciggy lighter and it is not to different in charge times than a 240 volt charger.
We use them at work and the smaller version will do wheel nuts at 300Nm of torque.
I have cracked the wheel nuts on my boat trailer which had not been touched for 7 years
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Follow Up By: Bob Y. - Qld - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:35

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:35
Allan,

Another vote for Milwaukee gear! I bought an 18v 3/4” impact gun when I was doing linehaul work some years ago. Better swinging off it than a 4’ length of pipe and a breaker bar when you’re changing a 10 stud wheel.

The 1/2” model might be a better option for you if you are going to resort to a torque wrench for final tighten.

Bob

Seen it all, Done it all.
Can't remember most of it.

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Follow Up By: Phil B (WA) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 06:27

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 06:27
Another vote for Milwaukee impact gun, I also take a recip. saw. Just brilliant.
There is a lot of difference between
‘Human Being’ and ‘Being Human’.





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Reply By: Gramps - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 18:21

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 18:21
Allan,

I've never used or needed either. Undoubtedly required in some situations but for my ramblings both on and off road they would just be useless ballast in an already loaded rig.

Regards
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Reply By: Michael H9 - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 18:41

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 18:41
I use a Ryobi impact driver because I already have the batteries and a 12 volt charger for them. It works great and very quick. Final tighten by hand. Ryobi don't seem to be that highly regarded but I have just about all their tools and garden implements and give them all a real flogging and I'm really happy with them.
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Follow Up By: tonysmc - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:23

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:23
I'm a convert after getting a Ryobi drill and I cannot kill it. I have now changed everything over to Ryobi and the 12 volt charger for the 18 volt batteries is perfect for camping. While I don't have an impact driver I have been looking at them and going by the website their torque range goes up to 199 ft/lb or 270 nm which is well above any Toyota recommendations.
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Reply By: Member - Barry P (VIC) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:19

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:19
you can buy a torque multiplyer to fit your wrench,probably from a good tool store ,not bunnings
AnswerID: 638192

Reply By: RMD - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:54

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 19:54
Alan.
Seeing you are asking. If needed for convenience I would use a small 1/4" drive impact drill with suitable addapter to socket to run the nuts off when loose enough and ON when replacing nuts. That way, any thread damage or dirt/burrs which may occur when wheel fitting, is detected and corrected before tightening. Final tightening with a tension wrench with appropriate extension for ease. If required. An acquaintance had a few studs break after a flat tyre on a 105 LC while in Qld. The very reputable 4wd shop in his home town did them up until they were damaged. He could not undo them and RACQ broke them when removing. Not found until the flat.
I have done up a lot of wheels on earthmoving and 4 we vehicles and cars and never used a tension wrench.
I use an ARB compressor and small fire extinguisher as reservoir. Easily runs a 1/2" rattle gun to loosen if needed. You can only loosen one at a time!
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Reply By: Frank P (NSW) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 20:04

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 20:04
Allan
IMO use a rattle gun only to undo the wheel nuts.

I have found that after a number of carefully calibrated tests LOL that my puny 78kg, 72yo body applied to a standard X wrench tightens wheel nuts to within a gnat's gonads of the correct torque for my BT50.

Seriously, I recommend a torque wrench. Like others have said, a rattle gun with or without a torque bar, is a purgatory waiting to happen.
FrankP

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Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 20:22

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 20:22
For final tightening all that is required is a set but adjustable length socket arm and a fishing spring scale of suitable size.

Used for finals at right angles to arm and clearly paint marked when torque is correct is all you need if "correctness" is desired. I have used similar to rebuild LARGE diffs and small auto adjustments. Basic but high tech.
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Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:30

Monday, Oct 04, 2021 at 21:30
Allan, I think you have the perfect system now, torque them to recommended and then they are easy to undo manually if not overtightened. Michael
Patrol 4.2TDi 2003

Retired 2016 and now Out and About!

Somewhere you want to explore ? There is no time like the present.

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Reply By: Batt's - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 00:16

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 00:16
I've been using a 12v torque wrench for maybe 8yrs or so. I'm onto my 2nd one first one lasted 5yrs from Kangaroo Creek Imports and it got used heaps. I then got the 2nd one from supercentre I rattle it up till it clicks twice then nip it up with a wheel brace. I still like to check the wheel nuts are firm by hand and don't just trust any torque wrench to complete the job. I have a 150 NM Makita rattle gun that came with a drill I bought yrs ago but it doesn't get them tight enough it will get an regular 8mm nut & bolt tight but not a wheel nut. I asked Makita what size they recommend the said they have an 18v for truck wheel nuts but I thought it was to expensive compared to the $50 supercentre job.
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Reply By: Member - John - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 07:06

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 07:06
Allan, I have used one of these for years, very good at getting stubborn wheel nuts off. In the past I used it to spin then nuts up with a final tension up with torque wrench, now after consultation with a tyre store owner, use it with a torque limit extension.
Impact Wrench
John and Jan

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Reply By: Member - McLaren3030 - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 09:52

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 09:52
Hi Allan,

The Makita 18 volt 3/4” Impact Wrench model number DTW1001Z has an adjustable torque setting. Soft = 300 Nm, Med. = 600 Nm, and Hard = 1,050 Nm. There is also a 1/2” model with similar torque settings, DTW1002Z.

You can also get a Makita 12 volt power supply battery charger for the Makita 18 volt batteries.

Not sure if they would be suitable, but maybe worth a look.

I carry Makita 18 volt battery tools, drill, driver, circular saw, chainsaw & grinder. I have found the battery chainsaw is really not suitable for decent size logs for firewood, so I use the circular saw instead.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 18:28

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 18:28
Macca is your chainsaw a single 18 or the twin battery (36 version )?
I have the twin and it is a fantastic saw
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Follow Up By: Member - LeighW - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 19:13

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 19:13
X 2 great saw

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Follow Up By: Frank P (NSW) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 21:24

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 21:24
My son had an 18V Ryobi chainsaw which was little better than a pruning saw. In fact that's what he did with it, clearing small scrub for a mountain bike track near home.

I bought a Victa 40V (marketing speak, actually 36V) chainsaw with 16 inch bar for clearing tracks and cutting firewood. It is fantastic and has saved my bacon a few times.
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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:04

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:04
Hi Alby,

Yes, my mistake, 2 x 18 volt means 36 volt chainsaw. You can cut up to 150mm logs, but it will quickly drain the batteries when working through hard timber. I carry quite a few spare batteries, but I find the circular saw (2x 18 volt) will handle the harder timber more easily. You do have to work the circular saw “around” the larger logs, but it does work.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 12:44

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 12:44
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Macca, that lowest setting of 300Nm is still well above my stud spec. of 240Nm. I am just as concerned with over-tightening than under when using an impact driver.
I would think that those torque setting functions on the impact drivers operate by sensing motor current and I do wonder how close that translates to chuck torque. But then, I also wonder at the accuracy of any torque control device other than a true torque wrench where it is reasonably easy to calibrate and maintain accuracy to the typical 4%.
Come to that, how critical is the OEM specification for wheel studs.? There would possibly be a reasonable margin of tolerance? But I don't wish to find out the hard way!

On top of all that, torque measurement on thread tightening does not reliably translate to stud tension due to friction on both the thread and under the head of the stud. Surface corrosion on either will add considerable torsion load for a given elongation. I do know that heavy machinery in industry often stipulate that the nominated torque values are for clean and lubricated threads. This also applies to flange bolts on high pressure natural gas pipelines. In this way, a closer relationship exists between torque and elongation forces. To this end, I use a proprietary thread lubricant on my wheel studs although I know this is controversial.

Alas, I would need to also obtain or borrow an appropriate torque wrench in order to confirm the performance of any impact tool that I may use. It all gets so difficult!!!



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Allan

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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 17:36

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 17:36
Hi Macca
My experience is the opposite, I also have the circular saw and the recipro saw and wouldn’t dream of using them to cut firewood
The chainsaw I think is equivalent to my little Stihl saw for power and don’t hesitate to tackle a 250 to 300 diameter log with it.
I live on acreage and have an open fire and will grab the Makita over the little Stihl for convenience to cut a small load but still cut the majority with my bigger 310 Stihl petrol saw

I use 5 A/H batteries and carry a spare set when doing a bit of a session with the saw but overall I am very pleased with the unit.
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Reply By: DiggZ - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 10:40

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 10:40
Seems as though people carry a impact driver to spin the nuts on and off and a torque wrench to finish the job. Seems like a waste of impact driver to me.
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Follow Up By: Gbc.. - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 11:17

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 11:17
I own a couple of impact drivers. They are good for spinning the nuts on and off where the whole manual wheelbrace thing gets a bit old.
I have a long flex bar from trade tools and a long socket for initial loosening and final tightening so I now leave the impact driver at home and just carry a drill for odds and ends jobs and spinning the nuts.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 02:28

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 02:28
I've never been to a tyre outlet that just hands the car back to the owner without checking the wheel nuts with a brace after rattling them up. There must be a reason for it.
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Reply By: Bazooka - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 11:30

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 11:30
Because you asked so nicely Allan I'm happy to reveal I carry a 12v rattle gun just in case my nuts get so tight that no amount of manual stimulation will easily get them off. When my nuts are free it's manual all the way until the job is done. After years of experience (and occasional checking with a torque wrench) I retighten my nuts by feel. The whole job takes less than 10 minutes and is very satisfying.

Bought the rattle gun years ago after an experience with a BJ outlet and some new rubber. For the first time ever I specifically requested that the nuts be torqued to spec and not overtightened - first time I'd used BJ services. "Sure, we always do that". Few days later was doing some work at home which required front wheel removal. Im-bloody-possible to crack the nuts. Jumped straight in the truck and back to BJ's (only 10 mins away fortunately). The usual palaver followed but they redid all nuts while I waited. Got home and lo and behold the front wheel nuts were relatively easily removed by hand. Whooda thort?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:07

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:07
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Fascinating Bazooka, but I'm not going there!! lol
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Allan

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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:04

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:04
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Whew! Plenty of advice there. Thank you all.
You have confirmed some of my thoughts and helped to determine my course of action.
It seems that I would not be alone if I carried a nut driver.

OK....
a) I prefer assurance of correct nut torque but my existing torque wrench is inadequate.
b) 177 lb/ft (OK Zippo?) on a manual wrench is challenging so an impact wrench is desirable.
c) Impact wrenches do not provide torque certainty so a limiting device is desirable.
d) For space and weight considerations I don't wish for batteries and charger.

So I have decided on a substantial12v corded wrench with a 175 ft/lb (USA made Zippo) torque limiting extension bar.
I have Anderson plugs at front & rear of vehicle so connection is a breeze.
For backup, I will retain the OEM wheel wrench which can be extended with the jack handle.

When I try it out I may provide a follow-up Thread with my verdict.
But with a bit of luck I will never need to use the thing in anger!

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - John - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:19

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:19
Allan, what "substantial 12 v corded wrench" have you decided on?
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:46

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 14:46
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I couldn't identify the one you recommended John, but found a "Dobetter" on Amazon.
It had good reviews.

Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: RMD - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 17:22

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 17:22
Alan

Just a little bit of info which may modify what you do.
From the net.
IMPORTANCE OF A TORQUE STICK

Torque sticks work by flexing (like a torsion bar) when a torque limit is reached. ... They must be used with an impact wrench, and if an impact tool with too high or too low setting is used, the torque stick will still over-torque the fasteners and may cause damage.

Are torque sticks accurate?
Torque sticks are most accurate with pneumatic impact wrenches. Electric, whether corded or cordless, are just too fast [too many impacts per minute] for the sticks to work properly. Electric units operate at about 2700 to 3000+ impacts per minute. At this rate, the torque stick cannot flex properly.

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 19:46

Tuesday, Oct 05, 2021 at 19:46
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Thanks for that RMD.

I'll bear it in mind when commissioning the tool.
Cheers
Allan

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Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:09

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:09
Hi Allan,

Is the price shown in the photo of the impact driver you provided $US or $AUS?

Macca.
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Follow Up By: Member - John - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:25

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 09:25
Just a bit of an update on the Impact driver I posted, it seems to have a clutch of some sort and it sort of winds it self up and then delivers a mighty whack to unseat stubborn nuts, unlike a rattle gun, if that makes sense? The reverse when fitting up, so maybe that is why it works well with the torque limiting bar I use? Link to seller of gun. Impact gun seller
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 11:49

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 11:49
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Hi Macca, that was Au$109.35 and free postage. I was on the Amazon.Au website.
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Allan

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Reply By: OzzieCruiser - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 11:59

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 11:59
It would seem that people are using a wheel brace/torque wrench to undo or do the final tighten of nuts and use battery a driver just to just remove and install the nuts rather than using its torque function to do the final tighten/loosen.

In that case why use an impact driver - a normal drill will work as well.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 12:54

Wednesday, Oct 06, 2021 at 12:54
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Ozzie, I would expect that they mostly would use the impact to remove and only to run-up with hand tighten.
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Allan

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Reply By: Phil G - Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 09:50

Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 09:50
Allan,
Geeze - 240Nm for a Mercedes wheel nut! I thought the 5 stud Toyotas were bad enough at 209Nm and I guess Toyota thoughtfully picked that number because the torque wrenches at Supercheap stop at 210Nm - haha

The way I see it, changing a tyre on a trip these days is an uncommon event so I don't carry anything special apart from a torque wrench. You might need an extension on your breaker bar! Lets face it, undoing the nuts will be the problem. And doing them up - just go as tight as you can, and when you get your tyre repaired can ask them to check the torque.

I have a 300W inverter for camera and Makita battery chargers and carry a Drill, angle grinder, reciprocating saw, blower and vacuum. The skins are light. I do have adaptors so the drill powers the jacks for the caravan and Troopy but that was just me overthinking things, although have to admit the jack adaptor comes in handy when using the jack as a beadbreaker.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 10:47

Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 10:47
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Yes Phil, 240Nm!! The handbook states: "Steel wheel bolts- 240Nm, Wheel nuts- 180Nm, Light alloy wheel bolts- 180Nm". And I drew the short straw with steel wheel bolts. Maybe I could switch to alloy wheels and thus reduce my burden to 180. lol.... Why are nuts less torque than bolts? RMD, are you there?

I could ask the MB service dept. but I bet that they would confuse me even more.
In all my past cars I just pulled up the nuts as tight as I could and never had a wheel come off.... at least, not that I knew about! When I got the Troopy I decided to be more careful and used a torque wrench, but the specs were not as high as the Sprinter.

As you say, changing a tyre is an uncommon event. I can't remember when I last had need in my urban cars and with all my time in the Troopy I have only had two punctures, and they were both on bitumen. I have been on some pretty rotten tracks in the Troopy, even a little cross-country, and never harmed a tyre. It surprises me at the accounts of some who destroy tyres several times in a trip. So what are the odds of a tyre change in the Sprinter? Dunno, but I needed to get heavier gear to cope with the 240Nm so thought that I may as well get an impact tool and enjoy the task. :))
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 16:58

Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 16:58
.
Phil, a thought......
Are German Nm's the same as Australian Nm's??
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Allan

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Follow Up By: Phil G - Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 19:05

Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 19:05
My very limited knowledge of German Nms was with my wife's Tiguan - it has wheel bolts with 14x1.5 thread - they were a ball rather than a straight taper. The torque was only 120Nm. So go figure. I guess there's a lot more to this than I can imagine. Maybe you could ask John Cadogan?? haha
But wheel bolts are a pain - I used to do the wheel rotations and fitting a wheel onto a small lip on the hub made it all very hard - Troopy is way easier with its fully floating hubs and wheel studs.
Anyway I reckon with a longer breaker bar you'll be fine!
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Reply By: Member - Cuppa - Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 19:55

Thursday, Oct 07, 2021 at 19:55
When I discovered the existence of 'torque sticks' I thought my dream had come true, but alas further investigation found that they were 'not a good thing' to use with the faster 'rattling' electric rattle guns.

I may still buy an 18v gun, having used a few different models borrowed from different owners over the past couple of years. With a bad back which needs to avoid straining, the guns have been very useful to undo stuff, including wheel nuts. The process for re-tightening the wheel nuts involves me doing the initial tighten (with a cross brace) & then getting my wife to give the nuts the final 'grunt' .......... hasn't failed us yet. Without the rattle gun a metre length of water pipe suffices for the undoing.

A couple of days ago I needed to check the front diff oil level. Was lent a Hitachi 18v rattle gun to undo the female 1/2" square plug. So easy ........... only thing which still puts me off is that the guns with sufficient grunt to be worthwhile are all fairly heavy....... more than the length of water pipe & we don't need to carry any extra weight.
See 'My Profile' (below) for link to our Aussie travel blog, now in it's 4th year

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