Drag Chain

Submitted: Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 19:41
ThreadID: 14292 Views:1641 Replies:4 FollowUps:8
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Saw one of these at Ray's Outdoors the other day and also saw one listed on Cruisin's checklist.

What do they do and how do you use them?

Jim.
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Reply By: Member - Roachie SA- Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:08

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:08
Jimbo,
Great for dragging stuff (hence the name).....eg: your out camping and want to bring a stump back to camp for the fire. Too heavy to lift...just wrap the chain around it and hook onto rear tow bar/recovery point etc.
Going along a mountain track and come across a fallen tree......link the chain around it and onto front recovery point....back up and drag tree to one side so you can proceed.
Also, can be used as an equaliser across your 2 front recovery points when winching in difficult situations and you want to spread the load evenly over both sides of the chassis.
Numerous other situations too.
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Follow Up By: Jimbo - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:49

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 20:49
Thanks Roachie,

Makes sense, I was looking for something too complex such as some form of stabilising device dragging behing the car.

Jim.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:19

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:19
You can also use it with a snatch block to give different arrangements for winching etc so you're not relying on trees to be in the right place when ya get bogged/stuck. Very handy.
.
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Follow Up By: Shaker - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 22:50

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 22:50
I have been waiting for an opportunity to bring this up ....... is it OK to pull in low ratio in reverse? I have always done it, but some say it bad for transmission & should turn around & pull from rear.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 23:04

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 23:04
no reason I can see why not, in fact reverse is a higher gear so it could/would be safer and easier on the car, that way you can also see the snatch block as it flies back at 100mph at you
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Follow Up By: Wazza (Vic) - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 16:51

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 16:51
Shaker,

I would definately not do it in a Landcruiser 80 series. This is the most common way of blowing the front diff. Same goes for reversing up a steep hill with a front diff lock engaged. Not sure about other models and manufacturers. A bit of discussion on the 80 series list on yahoo about it last week.

Wazza
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Reply By: vuduguru - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:35

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:35
Jimbo,

If you are looking to purchase ceck the loading. Snapped one draging a mate 3.0 out sidewards (45 deg) when he bellied on a ditch / mound... neither of us were impressed. Plus is they dont spring when they snap.
PS didn't have photos so mate reckons it never happened;-)
Shane
AnswerID: 66060

Follow Up By: Charlie - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 16:09

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 16:09
Safe working load is usually arround two ton so you need to use a bit of common sense but they are pretty handy because you can adjust the length unlike a strap.

Regards Charlie
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Reply By: The Banjo - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:40

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 21:40
Would a snatchem strap not be better if arranged safely with shackles etc ?
AnswerID: 66062

Follow Up By: gonebush - Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 22:18

Thursday, Jul 01, 2004 at 22:18
Not necessarily, because in some recovery situations you can't afford to have the vehicle being recovered move in say a sideways direction towards danger e.g a steep dropoff or to stop it from rolling over. A snatch strap can still stretch but the chain won't. A Tirfor and chain are very good for this and the tirfor operator simply lets out line or brings it in, depending on the angle, to maintain tension on the tirfor line/chain as the recovery progresses (which is normally by winch in this sort of situation).
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Reply By: richardrb44 - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 10:08

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 10:08
Hi Jimbo
Please be kind to the trees and use a tree strop and not a chain or winch rope,when in a recovery situation.
Tread Lightly.
Rich
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Follow Up By: Jimbo - Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 20:46

Friday, Jul 02, 2004 at 20:46
Fair call,

Jim
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