Tyre repair kit and electric drill

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 12:49
ThreadID: 143089 Views:1584 Replies:14 FollowUps:23
The only time I have had to use a tyre repair kit I found it extremely difficult to try and push the auger through thepuncture hole to open it up. (I am getting on in age and had to rely on help to do it)
Wondering if anyone has tried a battery operated drill to get through the tyre casing prior to pushing in the plug?
All comments welcome.

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Reply By: thinkin - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 14:24

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 14:24
My experience with this situation is, yes, it is okay to open very small holes this way. You naturally start with a smallish drill bit and increase in size until it is possible to push the plug in as required. Makes the job easier and i've had no failures.
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Follow Up By: toucan2489 - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 14:45

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 14:45
Thanks for that. Good tip on the drill bit sizes.
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Reply By: Chris J16 - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:07

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:07
From my experience working at a Motorcycle Shop, the trick is to re-inflate the tyre to say 40 psi. This makes it easier to use to auger or a cordless’s drill. A bit like a balloon if it’s tight it’s easier to pierce than if it is deflated. Also if you can keep the air pressure up after forming the hole it makes it easier to insert the plug/rope to finish the repair
AnswerID: 639077

Follow Up By: toucan2489 - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:26

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:26
Ok, thanks for the tip.
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Reply By: RMD - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:44

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:44
toucan
I found your bracketed sentence quite funny. One can't, but toucan!

I always carry some auto paint thinner. If a plug is required, a small rod bent 90 degrees at the end can be inserted and a small amount of thinner dribbled down the rod as you try to withdraw it but rotate it at same time. It cleans an inner annulus around the hole and vapourizes/dries quickly, That sort of primes the area inside so a plug, or rope or even the round mushroom shaped plugs can grab with glue at the inner edge of the hole. Most time they work ok but if more seal is required then the priming can help.
If you can't inflate as Chris suggested, use a jack above the sidewall, tyre on side, and squash the tyre a little so it doesn't push away so easily.

Having had to take the tyre off the rim for a repair, the thinner can be swabbed over the patch area to clean the OE crap off the butyl inner. Allows the patch glue to work on a clean surface.
AnswerID: 639078

Reply By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:51

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 15:51
Howdy, I think if you intend to use a cordless drill, I would use the tapered reamer tool that comes with the plug set, in the drill chuck. The reamer is designed to open the hole up to the correct size and fold back the steel belting and not cut them off. The steel belt grabs the plug and stops it pushing out with tyre flex and air pressure... A twist drill will remove rubber material, something you don't want. Also a twist drill may fold them back but may chew them off. Don't forget to use the Lubricant on the reamer. As Chris said above, pump up the tyre, i found it easier with air in the tyre. That's my thinking anyway, regards Michael
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Follow Up By: toucan2489 - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 16:30

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 16:30
Cheers, will check out the reamer.
Thanks.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 20:58

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 20:58
Michael
Air is fairly thin isn't it? The air I use is very thin and exits a tyre through the puncture site quickly. Especially a reamed hole the size being discussed here. Need a good compressor to keep up and it blows the sealant out I would imagine. I want some to be inside so it bonds the plug or string to the inside edge. Never tried with air pressure inside.
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 21:35

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 21:35
RMD, I've had a few nails in a few of my Patrols tyres and not totally flat so removing the nail only let's a little air out, lube the reamer and work the hole and steel wires, quickly push the string plug in with the needle. Most of the air is still in the tyre. When the tyre is flat, pushing the plug in tends to collapse the tyre inwards around the hole , making it more difficult. I'd say many people would have done the same as I have, if the tyre was flat with a slow leak you could pump it up before you repair it. Michael
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Follow Up By: Member - OzJourney - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 07:34

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 07:34
Just wondering what lubricant you use ?
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Follow Up By: Michael ( Moss Vale NSW) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 07:57

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 07:57
If you buy a kit in a plastic case, you usually get a little screw top jar of it. It looks like Vasaline but it's not. I bought a USA made kit over 20 years ago, the brand escapes me for the moment but I'm still using it today. It came with about 50 sticky string plugs and they still work fine. Michael
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Follow Up By: AlbyNSW - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 14:01

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 14:01
The string style plugs were a standard repair years ago but are illegal for a tyre fitter to use now.
I have plugged tyres that have lasted the tyres life, I know they are technically illegal but what is the worst that can happen, you get another flat tyre from it leaking?
My TPMS alerts me of a problem long before it becomes an issue
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Reply By: Member - Stevemc181 - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 17:34

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 17:34
I use a pointed carbide reamer in my drill when patching tyres, the aim is to cut the steel threads off clean, not tear them like a drill bit might.
AnswerID: 639081

Reply By: lkyphl - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 21:18

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 21:18
If using the "sticky string" method, it was suggested and demonstrated to me by a bloke at a tyre shop in outback-ish W.A. that three 90 degree turns of the "sticky string" forked inserter, before extracting it, formed a better seal inside the tyre. For what it's worth ...

Phil
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Follow Up By: toucan2489 - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 10:59

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 10:59
In other words, is it one 270 degree turn?
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Reply By: Genny - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 22:00

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 22:00
Avoid the cheap and nasty plastic handled repair kits. Accident waiting to happen should the plastic handle snap under load.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 09:29

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 09:29
True I've only used mine once it gives you the shivers thinking at any moment the handle will snap and you'll get a meatal post driven into your hand or up your wrist.
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Reply By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 23:46

Thursday, Jan 13, 2022 at 23:46
.
I was instructed by a tyre pro that the purpose of the reamer is to clear a path for the string by pushing aside the belt wires without fracturing them. The process is reasonably gentle on the rubber and wires.
Using a driven drill bit is likely to cut or fracture wires which doesn't seem a good idea to me.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: Chris J16 - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 07:28

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 07:28
In addition to my previous post and at the risk of stating the obvious, If you are talking about a 4WD, Truck or Passenger Vehicle Tyre I only consider this repair method an emergency or temporary repair to get you to the nearest tyre shop for a replacement tyre or an internal professional repair if structurally possible.

Most of my tyre plugging experience is plugging ATV (Quad Bike) UTV (side by Side) Tyres that generally
run 3 to 5 psi and operate in an off road environment, I have seen some trade-in ATV's come in with up to 30 plugs across four tyres and still hold air, just!!
AnswerID: 639087

Follow Up By: Member - pedro1 - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 12:22

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 12:22
I took my 4wd tyre to a professional tyre shop for repair, all he did was put a plug in it. I quizzed him on why he didn't put a internal patch in the tyre. He replied he hasn't for years and putting a internal patch in is really only a money making exercise.
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Follow Up By: OzzieCruiser - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 14:08

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 14:08
Pedro - then that tyre fitter is a goose.

Ribbon style repairs are for emergency use only and later removed and the mushroom/internal patch applied or the tyre disposed off. Though almost impossible to enforce, permanent use of the ribbon style is illegal in most jurisdictions. Yes they may last for years but in other circumstances they do fail.

Doing a repair correctly is not a making exercise - it is a safety issue.
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Follow Up By: Chris J16 - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 14:53

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 14:53
When I worked at the Motorcycle Shop we wouldn't even repair a tubeless Motorcycle Tyre with an internal patch, always advised the customer to fit a new tyre just too dangerous on a high performance machine.

I once fitted a new rear tyre ($360.00) to my 1000cc Suzuki Sports Bike, after only 80kms got a small upholstery tack in it only a pinhole. Agonised over swapping it out for another tyre, but cowardice got the better of me.
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Follow Up By: RMD - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 20:50

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 20:50
Pedro
The reason that tyre fitter only plugged it was so he saved time and resources for the same money as fixing it properly. Most people trust tyre fitters and believe them for some reason.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 22:10

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 22:10
Think you will find most people who spend a lot of time in the bush don't find a puncture an emergency. They find it a bloody nuisance and put a plug ( or two) in it.
Dave.
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Follow Up By: Batt's - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 09:38

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 09:38
Had a couple of nails or screws in car tyres over the years and have never had any of the different tyre outlets suggest anything else other than just plugging them.
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Reply By: AlbyNSW - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:24

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:24
At one of the 4WD and camping shows I attended the ARB stand was demonstrating how the tyre plugs work.
He was using a drill and about a 4-5mm bit that he was drilling into an inflated tyre and then proceeded to plug it. The tyre would of had over a hundred plugs in it from the repeated demonstration. I have done it myself when doing a roadside repair.
Alan’s remark about damage the wire is a valid point though. I don’t know how detrimental it is or how many strands get broken anyway from larger punctures received.
I am going to quiz the tyre shop when I am next in about it
AnswerID: 639088

Follow Up By: Member - McLaren3030 - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:40

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:40
Hi AlbyNSW,

What you have said with regard to the steel belts having already been damaged by the actual puncture. This would be particularly true with a “staked” tyre from a tree root etc.

Macca.
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Follow Up By: Allan B (Sunshine Coast) - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:55

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 08:55
.
Hi Macca,
I would not consider a "staked tyre" a candidate for repair using inserted 'strings'.
I sometimes read of blokes inserting a multiple number of strings in the one puncture hole. This is not an approved practice although 'anything goes' if it is an absolute emergency.
Cheers
Allan

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Reply By: friar - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 13:33

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 13:33
I carry a mushroom type tyre plug kit for my motorcycle,used it twice in the last month on my daughters car picked up roofing screw both times,used drill both times,hole was quite large did not expect it to work,but it did.
John
AnswerID: 639091

Follow Up By: Stephen L (Clare) SA - Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 18:31

Friday, Jan 14, 2022 at 18:31
Hi Friar

Have heard of these, but one question.

Are these the type that you have to use from the inside and pull the wire through the hole and then sealed?

I have only ever used the strings with no issues.

Cheers
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Follow Up By: Bazooka - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 11:52

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 11:52
You might find this interesting (and/or entertaining). Near the end he does a basic test using his four kits to check their "strength". Pretty basic but convincing enough.

"This tire plug can kill you"
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Follow Up By: RMD - Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 12:29

Saturday, Jan 15, 2022 at 12:29
Stephen
I have used the mushroom plug on a 10mm slot puncture, ie. large head, pull wire through and cut off excess rubber, after priming and cleaning the inner face to smooth, clean and roughened slightly with 80 grit and insert from inside, and because it both seals in the hole and under the top flap/mushroom with the cement it is permanent. Lasted the life of the tyre. Yes you need tyre pliers or similar to drop one side bead off but worth it. Rope style use only inserted as emergency. I wouldn't use any external inserted ones on my motorcycle as I value the riders life a reasonable amount. If I did it would be a slow travel speed to buy a new tyre asap.

Someone mentioned above to make sure you use lubricant on the repair tools. No way would I add lubricant because I am trying to get the hole and any inner material to seal and bond to the tyre butyl inner and through the hole. Not sure how you remove the lube to allow cement to work on the surfaces involved.
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Reply By: Member - William B - Monday, Jan 17, 2022 at 19:13

Monday, Jan 17, 2022 at 19:13
I use a kit called Stop and Go tyre plugger.

Stop & Go tyre plugger

It is certainly easier to insert with an inflated tyre.
I have a small reamer which I attach to a drill to clean up the hole.
The kit I use hasn't got the air compressor, its just a basic piece of gear but most have a compressor with them any way.

William

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Follow Up By: RMD - Monday, Jan 17, 2022 at 20:56

Monday, Jan 17, 2022 at 20:56
William.
All very nice, but many holes are not circular to begin with. A piece of shale through a near new tyre didn't make a round hole but a slit. Something round in a drill would have been pretty useless in my case and would make it worse.
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Follow Up By: Member - David M (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 19, 2022 at 12:10

Wednesday, Jan 19, 2022 at 12:10
Like most of us William B probably moves the drill bit from side to side to tidy up a small slit. Seems to work most of the time.
Dave.
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Reply By: friar - Thursday, Jan 20, 2022 at 08:18

Thursday, Jan 20, 2022 at 08:18
Bit late replying to your post,mine is the Stop & Go kit that has been posted on here.
John
AnswerID: 639163

Reply By: Member - Warren H - Thursday, Jan 20, 2022 at 10:21

Thursday, Jan 20, 2022 at 10:21
This thread has expanded a bit from the OP's question, but it has some interesting takes on tyre repairs/kits.
Here's an a similarly interesting thread from the Pajero forum. One of the points made is that if your tyre is repairable, the brown wax plugs may make a permanent legal repair difficult. I now have both the wax plugs and the reinforced vulcanised plugs. Fortunately I not yet needed to use either the repair kit or the R&R Beadbreaker.
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