Tyre Pressures on and off road

Submitted: Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 15:20
ThreadID: 14870 Views:1743 Replies:6 FollowUps:3
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Hi all,
Would like to get some info regarding cold tyre pressures.
I drive a 2003 GU 4.2 Tdi, running Cooper ST 285/75R16. I am relatively new to this size vehicle and tyre as I used to own a Hilux running muddies.

The pressures I was after are front/rear for on and off road (general bush tracks) with the vehicle loaded (full camping gear plus SWMBO) and unloaded (minus SWMBO).

thanks in advance

Peter
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 15:51

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 15:51
It depends on tire conditions/suspension/weight/track conditions/weather etc etc etc.

Its all trial and error.

Try 25-29psi offroad, and 35-40psi on road.
AnswerID: 68824

Follow Up By: Peter O - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 16:16

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 16:16
Thanks Truckster,
New tyres and stock suspension for now.

Thanks again
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FollowupID: 329327

Reply By: waveslave - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 19:30

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 19:30
Hey dude,

From my experience, I usually go as low as 15-18PSI. (BUT) if I have my truck FULLY LOADED (bout 3T) then I go about 23-25PSI.
AnswerID: 68871

Reply By: Richard & Leonie - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 21:53

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 21:53
Follow the vehicle manufacturers recommendations is the best advice for any tyre except extreme treads. I have just got home after three months travelling and about 5000 kms of dirt road, including going up to the top of Cape York up the OTR. I had new Cooper ST's fitted before we left and they had been inflated to 30 psi all around by the fitters. This pressure gave me a very harsh ride so I put it back to the recommended 26 psi all around and it was much better. Fully loaded the rear tyres seemed to bulge a bit (looked a bit flat) so I put them up to 28 psi on the road. On the road up to the Cape though I soon dropped them to 26 psi. The tyres seem to have worn evenly and did not have any chunks knocked out of them.
Regards
Richard
AnswerID: 68914

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 16:37

Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 16:37
Richard............. just what model Frontera is that???????????
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FollowupID: 329452

Reply By: dellycat - Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 22:17

Wednesday, Jul 21, 2004 at 22:17
Hi Peter,

As all tyres run on different tyre pressures dependant on size and load, The general rule for off road is half the normal road pressure you are running on. Once off road you can adjust the pressures further if needed.

Hope this is of some help.

Dellycat
AnswerID: 68924

Reply By: Moose - Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 13:14

Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 13:14
Peter
I run the same size tyre on a Cruiser (although it's the STT pattern). Unloaded on road I run about 32 PSI all round and generally drop down to about 24PSI off road. Loaded (campoing gear + family) on road about 38 PSI and off road about 30 PSI. However depends on how much load, travel speed, weather, road surface etc. The best thing to do is to use the 4PSI rule of thumb for on road pressure. Start with say 32 and run until tyre is at operating temperature. Take pressure again. If it has increased by 4 the starting pressure was OK. If it has increased by more then the starting pressure was too low, and if it has increased by less than 4 you had too much to start with. It's a bit fiddly but seems to work OK. Not suitable for off road though.
AnswerID: 69025

Reply By: Lone Wolf - Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 16:35

Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 16:35
What with all the fuss about 4 x 4's in the cities................ I reckon run em' soft enough so you don't damage pedestrians when ya run em' over every day like they reckon we all do..............
AnswerID: 69057

Follow Up By: Member - Penguin (NSW) - Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 17:01

Thursday, Jul 22, 2004 at 17:01
Naaaah, you need them hard so the pedestrians don't damage your mags!

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FollowupID: 329456

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