Cordless Ryobi Chainsaw

Submitted: Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 15:35
ThreadID: 15261 Views:4858 Replies:4 FollowUps:6
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Hi Everyone

Just a quick question.
Have you or does anyone you know have the Ryobi chainsaw?
We only want it to cut firewood for our trips.
We do have a bow saw but a small chainsaw would be nicer sometimes.
We don't want a fuel one and we recently saw the cordless Ryobi that would suit our needs.
We would like some feedback on it if any of you have one please.
Thanks for your anticipated help.

Cya
Tripp'n
:)
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Reply By: Utemad - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 17:41

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 17:41
I can't imagine a cordless chansaw would be much chop (sorry, bad joke).

However I have never used or even seen it so I wouldn't know.

You can get some pretty small 2 stroke ones. If all you are going to do is cut firewood maybe a cheapy 2 stroke is the way to go?

Utemad
AnswerID: 71104

Follow Up By: Tripp'n Around - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 17:53

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 17:53
Hi Utemad

Hehehe.....cutting it close there aren't we..... :)
Seriously, just looking and trying to get some info at the moment.
Have never owned a chainsaw so looking for some help either way.
Will keep your other info in mind until we decide what to do.

Cya
Tripp'n
:)
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Follow Up By: V8troopie - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 23:56

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 23:56
What constantly amazes me is that many people imagine you can only have a camp fire with neatly cut logs and such.
The aborigines had plenty of camp fires and no chainsaws, bow saws or axes suitable for hardwood chopping, back in the old days.

All you need to do is find at least 3 fallen branches and arrange them on the ground in a star pattern. Light the fire at the hub, where the pieces meet. Push the branches in occasionally to replace burnt wood.
This method gives a nice fire, not too big nor smokey and you can heat a billy by placing it atop the branches.

This kind of fire will automatically burn itself out if not tended regularly and its easy to extinguish completely by pouring a little water over the hot ends after they have been pulled apart.
Klaus
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Follow Up By: Utemad - Wednesday, Aug 04, 2004 at 15:36

Wednesday, Aug 04, 2004 at 15:36
Santa Klaus,

I understand your point of view and have used that method many times before. However that is not a method that you would want to rely on. It would also be one that you could get in the s**t doing anyway as fallen trees are homes to many of our native creatures and return much needed nutrients into the ground. If you use that method in a National Park and are caught you will most likely be fined.
When I travel I always carry a certain amount of firewood with me just in case I cannot get any legally where I am. When on weekend trips I take all the firewood I will need as if everyone collected firewood from around their campsite then it will run out very quickly. As I said that practice is outlawed in many areas anyway.

I have camped at Queen Mary Falls before and thought how amazing it was to watch half the campsite disappear into the surrounding bushland and then returning with armloads of wood. Just imagine what our country would look like if everyone did that?

Having said that chainsaws are also outlawed in National Parks. To even have one with you in a NP it needs to be disabled by removing the cutting bar and chain.

I use a chain saw to cut any large/hard wood at home but carry a bowsaw for cutting up any extra along the way. As for removing trees from tracks I have once used manpower but never needed anything more than that. I would just winch or tow the tree if it was too big for me to do by hand.

Utemad
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Reply By: SteveL - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 20:13

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 20:13
A cordless chainsaw may be OK for trimming a few live branches in the garden,but
trying to cut dead Australian hardwoods to use for firewood,it is really going to struggle.
AnswerID: 71134

Follow Up By: Tripp'n Around - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 20:22

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 20:22
Hi Steve

Yeah, that is what we are thinking but the TV show and the info for it says it will cut fallen timber for firewood while camping.
Just hoping someone has one or knows of someone with one to get some honest feedback on it.
We're not in a hurry and are happy to wait.
Thanks anyway for your input.

Cya
Tripp'n
:)
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Reply By: Member - Jiarna (SA) - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:07

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:07
Stick with the bow saw if you just want firewood. That way you won't be tempted to use more wood than you really need to. If you need a fire to keep warm, cutting the wood to get a fire going will warm you up nicely while you wait for the fire to get hot.
A bow saw is a lot easier to pack, too.
Cheers
John
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AnswerID: 71145

Follow Up By: Tripp'n Around - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:16

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:16
Hi Jiarna

Yes, the bow saw is good and we have always used it or a small axe.
We never burn more wood than we need for the night anyway so that in itself is not a problem.
I keep telling hubby the exercise will do him good but it looks like he's not believing me anymore....... :)
Thanks anyway for your time.

Cya
Tripp'n
:)
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Follow Up By: Member - Jiarna (SA) - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:21

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 21:21
I can identify with him. Last trip I tried to cut some dead mulga wood. Might as well have tried to cut a railway line!! Chainsaw wouldn't have done much better either - that's hard wood. But it burns nice and hot.
Cheers
John
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Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 22:32

Tuesday, Aug 03, 2004 at 22:32
I have a Stihl chainsaw that has a 13" blade on it (rated for 26" blade) so it fits neatly into a steel box with a 5L petrol container. I rarely take it with me, but have used it to clear fallen logs on trees on some occassions. As posted earlier, the aussie hardwoods are very hard (particuarly when dry like firewood should be) and i have blunted a blade before cutting through a ~6" log.

I don't use it for firewood because
a) you tend to cut too much
b) simply very noisy and
c) I need the exercise with the axe!!!

When using it as a track clearing tool, i could not imagine a battery powered one cutting anything you couldn't easily break with an axe. My stihl is relatively powerful and it still takes a lot of effort to clear some fallen trees. Also, you will still need chain lube and that tends to leave an oil mess wherever you store the chainsaw.

Plus, any tool that has the potential to remove limbs need to be treated with the utmost respect!!! Even a battery powered saw would take a few fingers as soon as look at them. It is something that one should have rudimentary training in at least.

I reckon stick to your bowsaw IMHO, or if you must have a chainsaw, get one that will do the job, just cannot see a battery one being capable.

Cheers

Captain
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