Wireless network

Submitted: Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:17
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Today we purchased a wireless network package access point, pci card and pcibus and WOW increased our internet speed from 10 mbps to 54 mbps thats mega bits per second for those IT drop outs like me. Has anyone one here have something like this and does it work well, i'm looking long term here to see if it has worked well for a while and are you happy with it, it certainly has improved our speed.

Baz.
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Reply By: Big Kidz (Andrew & Jen) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:26

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:26
Hi Baz

Jen and I love our wireless network at home. We can sit on our Queensize bed each with a laptop on our 'laptops' and type away - often to each other - saves talking hahaahahaa.

Not sure if it is faster but is fantastic.

Andrew
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Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:38

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:38
And they say conversation is dead !!!
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Follow Up By: Member - John C (QLD) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 21:03

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 21:03
now that's an idea.
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Reply By: Utemad - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:42

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:42
Yes I have a laptop and 54mbps G LAN too. Although the LAN is 54mbps unlike the B of 11mbps, your internet speed is still only whatever you ISP says it is. For eg I have ADSL with 64kb upload and 256kb download. I think Bigpond do up to a 1.5mb download. So even though your computers will talk to each other faster (across the LAN) the internet won't be any faster.

If you want to get even faster LAN access then just plug your laptops directly into the router and you'll get 100mbps

Utemad
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Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 17:01

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 17:01
We're on Optus cable don't know upload but download is 512mb with 1Gig download limit, it just seem faster it loads EO twice as quick as it used to it doesn't sit there loading for ages now it seems almost instant.
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Follow Up By: Utemad - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:08

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:08
Can't see how anything would load faster. Your download limit doesn't affect speed either. Just how much you can up/download for the month. 512kb is still only (sort of) .512 of a megabyte. So if you had 11mb LAN before and now have 54mb there should be no change in net access speed as 11mb is still crap loads more than .512mb.

Isn't wireless great..........hang on a minute...........just had to flush RAOFLMAO.

Utemad
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Follow Up By: Member - Ivan (ACT) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 21:47

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 21:47
Utemad,

correct in most situations (download limit not affecting speed), but there are quite a few plans which come out now where there is a fixed download, but when that is exhausted, rather than charge sh*tloads per Mb, they just reduce your speed.

Mine is 512 Mb/s for the first 750 Mb, but after that reduces to 72 Kbps (this is the second provider I have had that does this...
Cheers,

Ivan
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Follow Up By: Utemad - Sunday, Aug 08, 2004 at 18:06

Sunday, Aug 08, 2004 at 18:06
Yes Ivan. My plan has that too. However that was not what I was talking about. Although it is good to remember that happens if your speed suddenly decreases. I generally only use about 1 gig of my 10 but work pays for the connection so I am happy to have the other 9 up my sleeve :-)

Utemad
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Reply By: Member - Captain (WA) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:44

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 16:44
Hi Baz,

Has your actual internet speed increased? I think that while your home network speed has increased, the slowest link is still the actual internet connection, be it dialup, ADSL or cable.

These typically have a max speed of; dialup - 8kbps, ADSL - 50 kbps and cable - 450 kbps (note: k = 1,000 m=1,000,000). So, while your home connection between your laptop and server has increased dramatically, the speed the internet is served up to you is still dramatically slower than even your old home network speed. Hence I would not expect that you "see" the internet pages any quicker.

This is my understanding of the speed of the network system, but if any IT guru's out there can correct me, please do so.

Sorry to put a wet blanket on your newfound internet speeds ;-)

Cheers

Captain
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Follow Up By: Baz (NSW) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 17:04

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 17:04
Everything seems to load quicker instead of taking ages as i said above with EO for example.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 12:27

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 12:27
Maybe its loading faster from the cache Baz across the network, and thats what you're seeing?

Now onto more important things, have you got your warn 9000lb and live axle for the Exploder?
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Reply By: Mad Dog (Victoria) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:03

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:03
My network has been honking along for 12mths now Baz. Yes I'm very happy with it, can take the lappy anywhere around the estate with web access.

Sounds as though your "slow" machine has issues, maybe parameters not set correctly for cable which are slowing it down.
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Reply By: Member - Bob - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:05

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 18:05
I have been using ISDN because we can't get ADSL where I live. I have been thoroughly sick of getting download speeds reacking 7 kps max. So I ordered a one way satellite system which was delivered today. I have just spent the last 3 hours setting it up (and having fun). This is the first site I have logged on to with the new connection and it certainly scareams compared with ISDN. It has a max speed of 400 kps but this probably translates to about 50 to 70 kps in reality. It uses the phone line for the uplink. 3 Gig a month download limit. Costs 90 bucks a month. Initial cost including installation is $278 (because it is subsidised). I installed it myself so when the installer comes next week he can have an easy day.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ivan (ACT) - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 20:12

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 20:12
satellite is great for downloads - not as good for direct browsing (small pages with high frequency of requests) - too far to travel in a hurry (you can't change physics ;-)
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Ivan
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Follow Up By: Member - Bob - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 22:34

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 22:34
37,000 kms isn't far :-)
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Follow Up By: Member - Jiarna (SA) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 00:11

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 00:11
I have 2-way satellite broadband. Best internet access I have ever used. Average speed is 360kbps for both uplink and downlink, which leaves my old 56K modem for dead (especially since it runs at 16K from here due to Telstra's new 'improved' phone line).
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Follow Up By: Member - Bob - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 08:24

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 08:24
16 k is very good for a phone line. You will never achieve the rated speed of the modem. In fact, I don't think speeds of greater than 16 k are achievable. I maxed out at 7 k using ISDN, the same as I got with the 56 k modem. When I had 512 k in my office the maximum speed of download never got close to that. Similarly, the one way satellite link is rated at 400 k, but max speeds so far seem to be about 40 k.
The slower uplink has little impact on me, it is mainly mouse clicks. The download speed affects page loading, big file downloads etc and is the critical arm for me. There was a major jump in cost to two way satellite which I couldn't justify.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ivan (ACT) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 17:57

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 17:57
Lets not get our bits and bytes mixed up thought guys - remember, 8 bits to a byte..

Modem speed is generally measured in Kilobits per second, but downloads measured in kilobytes...

On a 56 kilobit p/s modem, 7 kilobytes is all you are going to get...

I have a 512 kilobit fibre connection, but the best I can ever get is 64 kilobytes per second..

(overheads will reduce above speeds and download rates)..
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Ivan
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Reply By: AT4WD ADVENTURES - Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 23:33

Friday, Aug 06, 2004 at 23:33
Baz,

I advise at minimum to disable the broadcast of the wireless network SSID or enable WEP encryption or set static ip addresses for your connected devices. Also make sure you change default usernames and passwords for your wireless router.

Otherwise your nieghbour might be surfing the web at your expense or worse looking at all the files on your network. These changes will make a not so secure medium a little more secure. Also WEP encryption will probably slow your data throughput down a little as it adds additonal parrameters to each ip packet.

Regards,

Stuart.
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Follow Up By: reisender - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 19:30

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 19:30
Good advice :)
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Follow Up By: Member - Ivan (ACT) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 21:44

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 21:44
I don't see how static IP is more secure - DHCP is default, and works well...

The other thing that I would do though, is limit the MAC (hardware) addresses which can access your network wirelessly
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Ivan
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Follow Up By: AT4WD ADVENTURES - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 22:24

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 22:24
Ivan,

What I meant was, what you typed, which is to list the MAC addresses of the users equipment that will be connected via DHCP as to only allow these access to the DHCP process. In other words narrow the field to those that are allowed to connect to the specific network.

It was late at night when I wrote the response...thanks for the follow up.

Stuart.
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Follow Up By: reisender - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 22:51

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 22:51
Still dont feel too save. the mAC can be set manually on most networkcards and is a piece of cake to be read out of a stream of communication so it is only a small piece in a puzzle. WEP is a must in addition and minimizing the amount of allowed clients helps. So if you cant login coz the client count is excceded you at least know that someone is hooked up illegaly and dont have to wait for the bill to tell you or the thief to steal your data.
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Follow Up By: Member - Ivan (ACT) - Sunday, Aug 08, 2004 at 07:15

Sunday, Aug 08, 2004 at 07:15
It's about layers of security, and risk - all the above add additional layers of security.

If you still don't feel safe, stay with a wired network!
Cheers,

Ivan
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Reply By: Baz (NSW) - Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 12:44

Saturday, Aug 07, 2004 at 12:44
Thanks everyone for your replies we are happy to with this setup so far and sitting in the backyard playing is good, i had made a mistake with our download limit it is 12 Gig not 1 as i said.

Baz.
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