Longer range fuel ?

Submitted: Wednesday, Aug 28, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 1836 Views:2060 Replies:5 FollowUps:9
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I have a GQ patrol on petrol (efi) and gas. I can only travel in good conditions 420kms on petrol and 300 kms on gas, but when i travel to places where gas is not available my fuel range isnt far enough. I have been told by various 4x4 shops that all i can have is the under the drivers seat 80 litre fuel tank because the gas tank takes up the room under the back. Does anyone know of another type of fuel tank which can hold 100+ litres? and still keep the gas unit...
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Reply By: Willie - Wednesday, Aug 28, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Aug 28, 2002 at 00:00
Use 5 jerries, mate. They are as safe as yesterday and you can put them anywhere possible on the vehicle ( legal or illegal ). I have a LR tank in my Nissan G60 and carry 4 jerries under the false floor, 190 litres all up. Can carry another 4 jerries on the roof and used them first on extended outback trips (but I don't like doing that). That gives me a capacity of 270 litres and an ouback distance of between 1080km and 1350km. Cheers, Willie
AnswerID: 6115

Reply By: kezza - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
Dont ya just hate that fuel economy- Ive used all sorts of long range tanks in cars and trucks for years I think the GU subtank will fit but its only a meagre 30 lit or less not too many options Im sticking to petrol and a 135lit main tank although try this websitehttp://www.floatpac.com/
hope this helps.

Just out of interest, I've found something interesting
Ive got an RB30 3lit petrol and the worst I can do On 95 lits of fuel is about 395kms (fraser Is heavy sand etc) the best is 720 kms(bruce highway a fairly flat run) 12mpg - 22mpg and Ive had times when Ive got over 22mpg between fuel ups when taking it easy ie approx 95-100kph The funny thing is the rb 30 can still drag off a 4.2 lit petrol (also does hold its own against the V6 prado I kid you not - ) cause it revs so exceptionally well (redlines at 60000rpm and will keep on going if you drove it like you hate it enough) and has a "powerband" (nissan motors typically rev higher esp the 4 cylinder mods but when I found out about the RB30 I test drove it 3 times before I was convinced) - best thing Ive ever had - Its an unpopular motor because it lacks grunt down low and most people dont know this secret and most like to lug the motor rather than "drive" it driving is a skill being lost, I think - my god we even enjoy having automatics in 4wds now LOL
[and yes I do know how to drive been a truckie in the bush for 10 years and an avid bush explorer for 30 odd years so Im not just into excessive wheelspin]
I have the choice economy or power- averages about 15-18 mpg on average weekend running 32X11.50XR15 mud terrains (BFG) about 50% offroad 50% highway. - Around town about 15 mpg (push it hard and you can swallow 23-24 lit/100km )but with a 50 -50 mix of premium or better and the right revs its getting places lots of other vehicles cant especially in sand and Mud. Next step a good set of extractors and maybe I wont have to change back to 3rd or 4th on those big hills.
I know this isnt a direct answer to your question but Ive heard a lot of debate re the various solutions to the economy/power/reliability issues so maybe if the 4.2 lit donk dies you could opt for a (SHUDDER ) smaller donk. I know a few people who cant believe their EFI gets such poor economy. Maybe others out there could add to this.

cheers

kezza
AnswerID: 6118

Follow Up By: Kezza - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
PS added about 1mpg or more by going up to 32"tyre from std 30.5"tyres I found no problems with gearing at 32" in fact slightly higher gears great on highway I did lose a bit of downhill braking in 1st but not such a problem with the nissan as they have central handbrake. All mpg figures calculated correctly adjusted for increased tyre size and speedo
kezza
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FollowupID: 2683

Follow Up By: Ray - Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00
Kezza,

I find your info interesting, I to have an RB30 but have never reached your fuel economy. I have heard of people getting those figures but no matter the conditions I have never been able to get any higher than 18mpg. I done tests at a range of speeds, monitoring head winds, temps and road conditions plus using different drivers. Now with a bit of age and more weight with accessories I can't get any better than 16.5 mpg. I even went to the expense of extractors, change of jets, modifying secondary activation and removal of heater grid in carby. This gave me about 12% increase in power and torque but no better fuel economy. Any ideas?? Thanks
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FollowupID: 2699

Follow Up By: Kezza - Saturday, Aug 31, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Aug 31, 2002 at 00:00
Only suggestion is gearing - larger tyres will = less revs = better fuel consumption I think the RB30 revs too highon the road with standard tyres - maybe Im gettin 2-3 mpg better with 32 " tyres
kezza
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FollowupID: 2715

Reply By: CLIVEB - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
VOXSON,
I HAVE THE SAME VEHICLE AS YOU,AND THE SAME PROBLEM.
I HAD BROWN DAVIS MAKE ME A 95 LITRE SUB TANK TO REPLACE THE NORMAL GAS CONVERSATION TANK OF 79 LITRES.
THIS TANK HUNG DOWN ABOUT 50mm BELOW THE CHASSIS AND ENABLED ME TO TRAVEL THE GULF TRACK TO ARNHEM LAND RECENTLY.
AS SOON AS I GOT BACK I CUT OFF THE TANK TO REGAIN CLEARANCE.
I MUST AGREE WITH THE OTHER REPLY,I THINK I WILL THROW THE LPG AND INSTALL A 145 LT PETROL TANK AT THE REAR.
WITH THIS SET UP, 145 AND 75 IN THE SUB TANK I WILL GET THE NECCESARY RANGE FOR THE NEXT TRIP (16MPG IS MY BEST RESULT WITH EXTRACTORS FITTED).
ONE OF THE BETTER ACCESSORIES FITTED IS THE LOW RANGE GEbleepTS FROM MARKS.MY AUTO NOW HAS BETER DOWNHILL BRAKING THAN MOST MANUALS,WITH THE HIGH RANGE UNNAFFECTED.
REGARDS.
AnswerID: 6133

Reply By: Cameron - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
We had the same problem, however we have 4 kids and tow a trailer and this cuts our range back substantially. I tried jerry cans a couple of times and decided to put a 120litre tank on the trailer. It is fitted with a small diaphram pump that pumps to the car. I top up the car tank from the trailer at morning tea and lunch stops. We keep the gas in reserve and use it on the last 300ks to a fuel stop. I have 100l of gas and 65l of petrol, and with the 120l on the trailer we have a total range (good conditions) of about 1000k. Bad conditions about 500, although with the trailer we have not been in heavy sand, (except the first time when we had to get pulled out !!!). Not really an answer, but the guys at Long Range Automotive, who built and fitted the tank where excellent.
One suggestion I was given by a "mate" was to fit an old holden fuel tank to the roof rack, very ugly, not very legal, but !!!. I chose the tank on the trailer.
AnswerID: 6134

Follow Up By: Bob - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
Cameron, that is a very interesting solution and one that I hadn't considered. I am used to carrying jerries in the trailer and have been happy with this setup as it gives me flexibility to move fuel around (if you have 180 L in tanks in the vehicle you can't offload it or transfer it to another vehicle if you need to). In your experience is there much advantage in having a single big tank, and having the diaphragm pump as opposed to toting jerries?
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FollowupID: 2689

Follow Up By: Robert- Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00
Hi Cameron,

I considered putting a fuel tank on the trailer, to avoid the hassle of carrying jerry cans, but could not find any ideal pump (hand operated or electric) to transfer the fuel.
Can you please give some more details on the diaphragm pump you use.
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FollowupID: 2696

Follow Up By: Cameron - Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00
Robert
The pump was supplied by LRA at Lilydale in Melbourne (They advertise in most off road mags). They gave me a few options, I chose the diaphram pump because it was relatively cheap, about $130 i think, but mostly because it was rated at 2l/min which was an easy way to monitor how much fuel has been pumped.
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FollowupID: 2707

Follow Up By: Robert - Thursday, Sep 05, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 05, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks for the info Cameron.
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FollowupID: 2832

Follow Up By: Cameron - Thursday, Sep 05, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 05, 2002 at 00:00
Robert, one other thing to consider with a fuel tank on the trailer is the flexing. LRA did some testing to my trailer before they would fit a fuel tank. Some of the lighter trailers flex quite a bit that can impose stress on the fuel tank, leading to failure, something to consider anyway
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FollowupID: 2855

Reply By: Member - Keith - Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Aug 29, 2002 at 00:00
I have LPG on an 80 series: 95litres main tank (petrol) and 80litres LPG. I carry 5 x 10 plastic jerry cans on the roofrack in a wooden box specially made so that the 5 jerries fit snug. The 10 litre jerries are easier to manage than the 20s. I fill the jerries only when I calculate that I will need them. For most treks, this works out OK, eg the Simpson in May this year. When planning for the Canning (future trip?), I enquired at one of the manufacturers of long range tanks - can't remember which one. I suggested to them that I get a gas fitter to take out the gas tank, install one of their tank for the trip, then get them to buy it back after the trip. They were interested in the idea but I must admit that I did not follow it up. Maybe there is something in all this that will help you....Cheers.
AnswerID: 6139

Follow Up By: Cameron - Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Aug 30, 2002 at 00:00
Bob,
I went for the tank on the trailer because we have a car full of kids, and I did not really like the idea of carrying so much fuel on the roof. Filling them was a pain, so was putting them into the car. I always seemed to spill fuel and ended up stinking for the next hour. Also all that weight on the roof did not seem like a good idea. It would have meant upgrading my roof rack, we only have a light tradesman rack that we use for carrying a spare tyre and fire wood. The diaphram pump puts out about 2 litres a minute, which is a convienent way to keep track of how much fuel is transfered. As for the convieniece, last trip we transfered about 1000l in total without any hassels or spills. It is also very simple to fill the stove.
The two main advantages as I see them in one big tank are the ease of filling (just the same as filling the car), and the pump makes topping up the car very simple and clean, and you can have toyr coffee and lunch while the car is filling. I designed the tank, and LRA made some practical modifications to fit their processing. In all the set up cost about $950, which was comparable to a better roof rack and a few extra jerries.
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FollowupID: 2706

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