Patrol nerdy question

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 16:09
ThreadID: 19089 Views:2131 Replies:5 FollowUps:7
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Hi all,

I have recently been graced with a showroom spec 2004 Patrol ST 3 Litre TD Auto to trounce around in over Christmas. All very nice and impressed. And yes it was well trounced.

Now for the nerdy question... I've noticed that in other markets (UK) Nissan offer an electronically disengaging rear axle stabiliser controlled from the cabin (no, not an extra set of wheels to stop you tipping over) The precise action and enhancement isn't clear from all the blurb I can glean.

My question is - how does this affect handling compared to an AU spec vehicle which doesn't have this? I only ask as IMHO the body roll is comparatively small in the AU spec vehicles compared to some other makes, yet it soaks up the off-road bumps and its articulation is very impressive (xmas examples available ;) ). Maybe I'm not throwing into corners like an urban Pom might? I'm not looking for the merits of 4x4 different makes here - just what the benefit of this gizmo is in the UK.

Now a bonus question which likely has a very simple answer. The sub tank on this thing is very useful, giving it that extra 35l capacity, but why a manual switch and two gauges? Why not have one seamless gauge, or even seamless transfer on low. What is the train of thinking for using sub tanks - or am I overcomplicating it?

Many thanks,

Tim
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Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 16:59

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 16:59
I believe this feture disengages the rear anti sway bars. This would aid articulation (wheel travel) enhancing off road performance I am unsure if oz spec patrols even have rear anti sway bars and if they did I would imagine a device that diconected them would be illegal as it would be like disengaging any other safety feture of the vehicle. I cant imagine it would be of much use in the UK except at private 4wd parks. I am just guessing
as for the sub tanks a dicky 35l barely bigger than a jerry is a bit of a waste but being a patrol I am sure there are decent aftermarket units around. The 50l on my 80 is barely adequate. I guess the manuel switch remins you to get to a filling station a seamless gauge wouldnt tell you how much is in the sub. Some systems have one gauge that show the level in the sub when the button is pushed. Not much good if you activate the sub button and the gauge heads further south than when it indicated the main fuel level
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:31

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:31
The GQ TI models had detatchable rear antisway bars, all Patrols have rear anti sway bar. The GQ's had a handle that one pulled which unlatched the bar for increased articulation, on comp units many people remove the bar entirely to increase articulation.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:34

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:34
Yup GQ had it, its now in the shed, whats this swaybar you mention? :P
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:43

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:43
Should have known that yours would be on the floor in the shed hahahaha. Did you have the detaching lever and all?
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Reply By: Peter Guy - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 17:12

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 17:12
Hi Tim
the sub tank is disapointingly small on the Patrol. It should be 50 - 60 litres at the very least.Dont forget it can't draw all the fuel. There is approx 5-10 litres which sits below the pickup pipe. So you you really have only 20 -25 litres.
By pushing the sub tank button on the dash you are activating the tank pump which pumps the fuel from the sub tank into the main.It won't do this automatically, the driver has to activate this.
This feature has the advantage of saving the sub tank fuel if the main tank is holed. You can then fix the hole and start pumping the fuel into the main tank at your convenience. Otherwise if it was was one big tank you could end up losing all your fuel leaving you stranded.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:28

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:28
the sub tank on my GU is 30l and I regularly put 30l into it to refill it, good check for the accuracy of the pump. I dont reckon theres much left in there after I have dumped it into the main tank.
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Follow Up By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:28

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:28
G'day Peter,
Mate, I gotta disagree with you on the amount of fuel unable to be transferred......I regularly transfer it over and when I do it always takes about 33 litres to fill the sub.
However, I do agree that the size of the tank is disappointing and considering there are aftermarket units available that hold 81 litres, I cannot see why Mr Nissan didn't make better use of the space.
I also agree that the idea of being able to control when/if to transfer the fuel is a bonus and also the idea of a separate gauge.
Cya mate
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:36

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:36
I cannot see why Mr Nissan didn't make better use of the space.

Same reason that 4bs are all becoming IFS, and road orientated.. most would never use it. Only 2 ltrs to the school to drop off the kids...
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Reply By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 17:52

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 17:52
I recall some MQ and possibly GQ (early) patrols having factory locking diffs and factory sway bar releases. The only problem was the "quick" release was just that, quick to release and as anyone would know if they have put a sway bar back on not so very quick to re connect. ;-)

The surf "had" a rear sway bar but I kept breaking the brakets that held in on under extreme articulation so I just removed the bugger all together, yeah you get a slight amount of extra body roll but after I installed my Firestone Airbags in the rear springs it's basically cancelled that out now.
Me happy now.
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Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:33

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:33
the release was a simple latching mechanism that relatched once the weight came back on the bar, worked pretty well for a while, but the mechanism had to be maintained or it wouldnt unlatch.
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Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:34

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:34
My insurance company would have a field day with me I reckon.......
I've removed both of my sway bars and my rig runs @ 3050kg B4 I load it up for a trip (therefore I'm over GVM all the time. I have 5" Lovells at back and 4" at front (despite this it "looks" level due to the very heavy rear steel bar and extra spare wheel, 145 litre main tank, full length steel roof rack, permanent fridge mounted etc etc)
I barely notice any difference between the vehicle with or without the sway bars, but this could have a fair bit to do with the size (ie: diameter of the steel) of the springs themselves. I don't think I'd like to drive a stock GU without sway bars the same way I drive my set-up.
Cheers,
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Reply By: muzzimbidgie - Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:47

Wednesday, Jan 05, 2005 at 20:47
The only dissapointing thing about the sub tank on da GU is that it pumps into the main tank, instead of having its own feed to the fuel pump, like on a new-ish troopie. If ur main tank is holed in a big way or somehow gets full of crap, you have to stop and fix it there and then, rather than get youself to a workshop to fix da problem. As for capacity, I've travelled with a diesel 80 series, towing same camper as mine and I use, on average, 12lts less at each fuel stop than him.
On highway travelling with not much load I get around 1100 k's.

Cheers,

Muzz
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