2H overheating

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 00:07
ThreadID: 19104 Views:11041 Replies:10 FollowUps:5
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Hi, I've got an '89 troopcarrier with the 2h diesel, its done 205000kms, aftermarket turbo, i think its an arb brand kit, been on since new, i've had the car for about 3months, any way it overheats consistently in warmer weather, i've had the radiator proporly cleaned and had baffles put in it too, thermostats fine, a/c condensor fins are clean and straight, i moved the horns out of the way of the radiator too. just wondering if any one else has had these probs before, and am wondering about the knuematically controlled injector pump-how a positve air pressure affects it(cause of the turbo),any info besides radiator and fan ideas, the previous owner was very pedantic, i dont think he would had let a problem like this go on unrectified, so i'm sure one day it used to very reliable.
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Reply By: Jim - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 01:55

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 01:55
Hi Rob,

When it overheats, where does the needle register on the guage?

Does it go into the red zone, or does it travel to about half way?

Does it overheat on level roads, or uphills?

Does the aircon make a big difference?

Don't know what yopu mean by (pneumatic injector pump).

Jim.
AnswerID: 91528

Reply By: muzzgit - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 02:19

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 02:19
Hi Rob, I'm no mechanic but I would say you need to get the block flushed out.
Also, what about the water pump? any corrosion? If airflow and fan/fanbelts ok, then it's most likely slow movement of coolant is problem. Could be turbo/exhaust related if exhaust gasses can't get out of the cylinders quick enough.

I would also look at fitting a mechanical temp guage into the side of the block. Electric temp guages can be moody if vehicle old. Also, standard temp guage is high up in cooling system. If you have a sudden loss of coolant, temp guage cannot show correct reading when its surrounded by air!
I have fitted one of these into every car Iv'e owned (not da 3.0 GU cos I don't know where to put it) and found that it reacts and behaves differently to standard guage.
You can get them from good auto parts place and they come with fittings to suit many cars. Your block has a plug in the left side under exhaust manifold, goes straight into water jacket in the block. Dont bend the metallic pipe like cord that goes to the guage and it with work for ever, does not need power.

As for the turbo, the 2H has pre-combustion chambers which, I think, would negate any problems with extra cylinder pressure. Also any extra pressure would be miniscule compared to what the injectors and injector pump is built to withstand.

Like I said, I'm no mechanic. So someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

Cheers,

Muzz
AnswerID: 91529

Reply By: Member - Geoff M (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 07:39

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 07:39
RobV,
On the rear of the injector pump, top of the diaphragm chamber is a nipple and black rubber hose.
On the original 2H normally aspirated this is plumbed to the inlet manifold, above or below the butterfly I can't remember.
Trace it back and see where it is connected after the turbo install.
I think you answered your own question on this when you said, "the previous owner was very pedantic, i dont think he would had let a problem like this go on unrectified"
I really don't think there is or was a problem, I'd imagine the turbo fitters would have this well sorted.
Actually, thinking about it, this is a balanced diaphragm on the 2H injector pump, it has a pipe to each side of the butterfly and works on differential pressure. Or pressure drop across the butterfly.
Doesn't matter if the inlet tract has positive, atmospheric or negative pressure. The diaphragm will still open the fuel rack.
If the system wasn't working you'd never get the engine above idle.

Geoff.
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
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AnswerID: 91535

Follow Up By: RobV - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:22

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:22
thanks geoff sounds like u know a bit about these, i'm just wondering about that diaphragm though. I've got the vehicle stationed in Darwin at the moment so its not real urgent at the moment. Anyway i'm thinking about a dynotune to measure the exhaust temo and boost pressures, this should point me in the right direction, wether its a cooling system prob or overfueling. I may even removethat rear section of the pump and visually inspect the diaphragm too cause i noticed occasionally at cruising speed say 60-70 in 4th it would sometimes give a little surge as if i'm tapping the throttle, dunno. thanks for your info.
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FollowupID: 350141

Reply By: chappobriz - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:03

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:03
Rob,
I spent 3 years with a heating problem in my 85 sahara ( 3 F) and it turned out to be the fan clutch. When you rev the enging does the fan suck through increasing amounts of air on revving? If it doesn't then this may be the problem. I don't know much but this may help? Cost my $191 for a new one and my car has never run hot since, not even in very soft and loose sand towing a trailer!

Just an opinion that may help you out.

Chappo

AnswerID: 91541

Reply By: greybeard - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:55

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 09:55
replace the silicon fluid in the fan clutch, ~$10-$20 I think there has been a thread on this topic before on here or on the outerlimits4x4 forum
AnswerID: 91549

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:27

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:27
I recently did my 80 series fan check the above post about nissan fluid couplers I put the procedure there and it worked. I will now do my 2h powered camper as I have had exactly the same problem as you
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FollowupID: 350144

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 11:27

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 11:27
I should also mention that these fans it is not usually obvios they are not functioning correctly I would DEFFINITLY Start with it. As mentioned my 80 series had a brand new radiator flush etc etc the fan appeared tpo be working until I pulled up when the temp gauge headed nth and when I shut it down the fan just kept on spinning. Then within a couple of minutes it had "tightened" back up again. They are a bit of a black art and seem to be poorly understood but from my own experiences and from reading this forum over the past year they seem to be the best place to start with mystery overheating problems
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FollowupID: 350175

Follow Up By: Member - Jeff M (WA) - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:56

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:56
AMEN DAVOE!
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FollowupID: 350608

Reply By: Member - Geoff M (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:47

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 10:47
RobV,
I've had two Landcruisers with the 2H engine and they'd both hunt at around 60-70km/h in top gear when fitted with 15inch wheels. Didn't do it on the standard 16inch split rims. (One was a 4 speed, the other a 5 speed)
I put it down to the different circumference changing the gearing and confusing the governor somewhat. Just lived with it.
A dyno and exhaust gas monitoring may solve your overheating.
Also the fan's viscous coupling is an excellent place to start. My mates Hilux started overheating on Fraser Island years ago, was fine on the road. The extra load from the sand was enough to annoy it.
Back to the pump, (this is all from memory, please check the accuracy)
The diaphragm chamber has a wire seal with a lead crimp from memory. The diaphragm itself is actually leather in these models. There is an oil listed in the 2H engine manual for keeping the diaphragm supple.
If I can find my old 2H manual at home I'll post some details from it tonight or tomorrow.

Hope all this helps,
Geoff.
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
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AnswerID: 91568

Reply By: Shane (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 11:51

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 11:51
Does your vehicle have a oil cooler fitted to the front part of your radiator or condensor. If so let me know and I may have a fix for you.
AnswerID: 91579

Follow Up By: RobV - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 12:33

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 12:33
yeah it does have a cooler in front of the condensor, i've thought about moving it elsewhere, whats your thoughts?
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FollowupID: 350199

Reply By: ianmc - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 20:15

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 20:15
Lots of good thoughts above but Q? Does it blow a fair bit of black smoke when loaded up ot revved hard? If so its running too rich & in a deisel that will make it run hot & crack pistons, opposite to a petrol it seems!
AnswerID: 91647

Reply By: troopymad - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 22:04

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 22:04
Yer Rob,
Whilst my mechanical skills are not one of my strengths I had a slight overheating problem with my '96 troopy while she was under load or working a little.The solution ended up being replacment of the viscous fluid in the cooling fan assembly.(breaks down /looses its consistancy and fan does not spin and cool efficiently)This was obtained through Toyota and apparently is a fairly common prob.As i said Toyota supplied the two small squeeze bottles and once added stopped any fan slippage etc and (co-incidently maybe)I havent had a problem since.May or may not be of any help to you mate but good luck with it.I'd also be interested if any other troopy owners have had this same fan issue.
AnswerID: 91677

Reply By: Shane (QLD) - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 10:09

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 10:09
Yes RobV I had a bad overheating problem whereapon once you gave it a bit of stick the temp gauge would rise to 3/4 and into the red up hills. This is on a 60 series with aftermarket water cooled Turbo. As I said I tried everything, including taking it to the experts who fitted a temp boost gauge and pyrometer and then took it for a run. Boost was max 7 lb at 3500 and egt about 650 to 700 up the biggest long hill with the foot flat to the floor. There was no black smoke out the back so it wasn't overfueling, but the temp went into the red. Asked my friend who owns a 4WD drive business and who done the tests what to do and he replied Burn It or sell it. At the time we where standing at the front of the vehicle when he looked down and noticed the oil cooler in front of the radiator,and said I didn't notice that before. It covered 1/4 of the top of the core. He said I bet thats your problem. He stated 2H motors don't need oil coolers as they have a gallery in the engine that cools the oil. I removed the oil cooler and have never had a problem since. I then cleaned out the oil cooler, mounted it under the L/H guard on the chassis rail, diverted the water from the Turbo through it for additional cooling and when the viscous fan kicks in it gets additional cooling. 2H's I believe don't take to Turboing kindly and the radiator system will cope in the normal aspirated guise, but load it up with a Turbo and then put a very hot oil cooler in front of the most critical part of your radiator and you have problems as I found ou. The temp gauge now runs on a 1/4 normally and will go up to 3/4 if you give it a boot full on the open road or up a steep hill and this is with the air con on. Let me know how you go. Regards.
AnswerID: 91740

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