HELP! with Tyre Changes

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 14:58
ThreadID: 19114 Views:6762 Replies:15 FollowUps:23
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Greetings, People. Can anyone point me to an online step-by-step illustrated guide showing how to do a 4WD tyre-change? I run a Troopy with split-rims and tubes. I've got a jack, two 24' levers, a rubber mallet and a compressor...is that all the kit I need? I want to get some tyre-change practice in before I hit the Gibson this season, but I'm not sure of the exact procedure. All help gratefully received. Cheers, Dom :)
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:09

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:09
I would recommend joining a club and being shown everything properly...

Or doing some driver training courses that will show you 'bush mechanics' to get you going in the event of other failures... before you 'hit' the Gibson this season
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Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:15

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:15
Thanks for the follow-up Truckster. All sound advice ... I already rang round but none of the clubs (VIC) offered tyre-change courses. I'm heading north in 2 weeks, so am really looking for some visuals I can refer to. Cheers, Dom.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:41

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:41
Our club does. Nissan Club of Vic. Most of them do.. Its part of the driver training course, its not an individual course....

2 weeks.. Me thinks you are very unready for the trip...
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Follow Up By: Domster - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:36

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:36
Thanks. I reckon I'll be able to learn how to change my own tyres in 2 weeks. Dom.
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Reply By: Leroy - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:25

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:25
Our Club had a tyre changing/repairing night at ProComp a while back. Maybe give them a ring and have a chat.

Leroy
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Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:26

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:26
ok - thanks Leroy. Got a name / number? Cheers, Dom.
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:42

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:42
www.procomp.com.au

in Narre warren
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Reply By: Member - Thommo (Melb) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:31

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:31
Hi Domster

Try www.tyrepliers.com.au

Might give you some sort of a guide

Regards Thommo
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Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:42

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:42
You legend Thommo, thanks. That's a great site - going straight into my bookmarks. In fact, I think I'll call them and order some pliers! Dom. :)
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Follow Up By: Leroy - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:19

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:19
buy them from ProComp and they will show you how to use them!

Leroy
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Reply By: Rod W - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:40

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:40
Go to your local tyre shop, I'm sure they will only be to happy to give you a demo.
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Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:45

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:45
buy a set of tyre plyers
1) mark tyre with chalk that writes on tyres avail from tyre places. Mark v for valve position and a line where the split is (they should be oppisite each other you may also need to mark positions of wheel weights
2) remove the valve
3) use tyre pliers to break bead both sides (this is not an ardous task with splitties and is often unneccasary
4) look oround the split and about 5cm to the left of the split is a slot (5cm to the left with you facing the split and the split closest to you
5)using the flat end of a tyre lever hook it under the split and use it to push down on the side of the split with the slot
6) while exposing the slot put the other lever into the slot using the curved end (have the curve facing the outside of the wheel not the inside
7)release 1st tyre lever and stand on second pulling the split out
8) use other lever under split area to lift side of split
9)holding side of split up with one lever grab lever that was in slot and place it under split and into section of wheel where hub goes
10) kick it around split will come out
11) lift tyre oppisite end of valve then manoevre valve out
12 fix flat (I can go into detail here as well if req)
13)put tube and dust cover back in tyre and lay tre back over rim by inserting valve then lay tyre down over rim
14)lay split on rim and put foot on one side of split forcing it down then stamp around split seating it correctly
15) replace valve and re inflate
IMPORTANT PLACE TYRE UNDER VEHICLE ON PASSENGER SIDE TO INFLATE incase split pos off

But sheesh it makes a fairly simple task sound complicated perhaps see if the local tyre fitter will show you
(IT IS A SIMPLE BUT POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS TASK PROFESIONAL TRAINING IS ADVIZED)
AnswerID: 91615

Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:52

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:52
Nice one Davoe ! - thanks for taking the time to provide some genuinely helpful info - much appreciated. :) Dom
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Follow Up By: Peter Guy - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:56

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 15:56
Yes you can't emphasize enough the danger of the split firing off the rim under pressure. I know people who are very experienced and they still have been badly injured - cracked ribs and concussion!
If you have the space, a simple steel frame/cage around the wheel is a very useful accessory.
The other useful accessory is some detergent or lubricant jelly to help slide the tyre/tube over the rim.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:03

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:03
Ta Peter they tyreplier actually make strapping that does the job of a cage. I have never had one go off but the idea is the passenger side doesnt have any fuel /brake lines if it does. Never had the need for lubricant jelly but I have heard it works does it have other uses? and I forgot to say it should be done on a tarpo to keep dust/mud out
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Follow Up By: Willem - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:53

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:53
Ahhh......Now here is a bloke who has changed a tyre or two in his life. Been there done that too mate. Funny, I never thought I would go for them tubeless tyres but here I am with 10ply Kellys and Cooper STT's for the rocky stuff.

My mate out here on the station runs 750x16 MRF 14ply on his utes. They are so rugged that with only 10psi in them they still look fully inflated :o)
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Reply By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:02

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:02
ok - Thanks for raising that one. Do you think putting a couple of web-straps in an "X" around the wheel before inflating the tyre would stop a popping slit-rim from flying? Any other suggestions? ( I won't be taking anything like a cage along with me.) Cheers, Dom.
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:06

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:06
tyre plier make exactly this device
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Follow Up By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 23:07

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 23:07
I've always inflated with the tyre standing up and the split side leaning towards another tyre on the vehicle.

Also, just to add to Davoes excellent instructions, a big screwdriver may be a better device to use in the slot that is 5cm clockwise from the split.

Keep all dirt out, remove any stickers.

Breaking the bead can be bloody hard if the tyre's been on a while and theres rust around - usually need to work the beadbreaker around the whole tyre.
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Reply By: Mike Harding - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:03

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:03
I have a little book which I purchased from the Melbourne Map Centre, 740 Waverley Rd, Chadstone, 03 9569 5472 a few years ago entitled "Tyre Repair Made Easy"
sub title "A ‘How To’ Guide on Tyre Repairs" published by Tyrepliers Engineering P/L who are on 03 9744 7829 or www.tyrepliers.com.au - no idea if it's still available or if the above contacts details are still valid but it's a great little book and will give you all the info you need.

Mike Harding

mike_harding@fastmail.fm
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Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:06

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:06
Cheers Mike - that sounds like an essential reference tome - and the second recommendation for that 'tyrepliers' mob. I'll try and get hold of that. Thanks for the tip mate. This forum has been great. Dom :)
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Reply By: muzzimbidgie - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:59

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 16:59
I know this sounds daft, but if there are any truck drivers who live near you, who own the rig, they will always be fixing punctures (I used to get 2 or 3 a month). Turn up with a couple of coldies and ask if you can learn how it's done. Otherwise go to your nearest tyre dealer. If the tyre dealer looks at you as if your daft, tell them, as you're pulling out of the driveway, that you'll never buy tyres from them.

To lessen the risk of injury when inflating tyre after repair (from split ring bursting off) firstly go around with mallet, hitting split ring as many times as you can, & turn the tyre over so ring is against the ground while inflating. I wouldn't recommend putting it under the car. Trailer maybe, but not the car.

If you have a printer connected, print off this page, go out to your troopie, take off a tyre and practice (step by step), what has been explained by others here. You can take as long as you like, and no-one will laugh at you, cos you'll be in the comfort of your own back yard, not stuck on the side of the road. The reason for marking the tyre with chalk is to help retain some of the ballance. If you put it back together with no regard to where everything was (weights, valve, split ring), the tyre may end up so far out of balance it could be dangerous at speeds above 40klms.
Also, you will need to get a good puncture repair kit.

Cheers,

Muzz
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Follow Up By: Domster - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:13

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:13
Cheers Muzz.
Very good idea about inflating tyre 'rim-side-down'. And thanks for emphasising the point about the chalk markings - understood. I've got this page printed and will definitely get some practice runs done in the yard before heading out.

One more question - are tyre-pliers the same as a 'bead-breaker' or is it a different tool? (people seem to use the terms interchangably).

Thanks m8 - Dom :)
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Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:46

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:46
tyre pliers are a tool that breaks beads easily there is an r and r bead breaker thet works differently (never used one) and then there is the old fashioned bead breaker kinda like a hammering jemmie bar (not recomended) I have used tyre pliers and they are great however splits do not seat into beads like tubeless tyres and you can often change them without breaking the beads at all. I usually only do the side with the split on it. Under the car is fine but make sure it is the passenger side and there are no aftermarket accessories there (my personal vehicle has a water tank. upside down makes the job a bit safer but more awkward
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Reply By: muzzimbidgie - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:41

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 17:41
Some people may call "Tyre-plyers" a bead-breaker, but I knew it as a large
tyre lever about 4 feet long with a sliding sleeve over the top that you would use to belt the crap out of truck tyres to break the bead. Some tyres, even small 4x4 tyres, are a bugger to break if the tyre and rim have been together for a couple of years. "Tyre-plyers", from what I've seen, take a lot of the work out of tyre repairs, making it easier to break the bead on split rims, and they also make it much easier to remove a tubeless tyre from the rim, which, usually, is a real pain in the back, legs, arms, fingers etc etc;

Out in the bush, give me split rims anyday !

Peple who say skinnies are no good in the sand amaze me. I've had 2 forby's with them on, and I went everywhere anybody else did, I just had to stop a bit ealier than some to let the tyres down. Once everyone had reduced tyre pressures, no one did any better or worse. Only engine power, or lack of it, seemed to make any difference between one vehicle and the next.

Cheers,

Muzz
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Follow Up By: glenno(bris) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 18:49

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 18:49
Exactly . Troopy 1Hz non turbo . Cannot get any momentum in sand + heavy weight = bogging down
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Reply By: Member - Geoff M (NSW) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 20:49

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 20:49
Hello Domster,
Whilst at te local Bob Jane outlet I was reading a 4WD Monthly special edition, quite recent publication. Maybe drop by their web site, might have it published.
4WD Monthly
It had full pictorials of tyre changing with both split rims and well based rims. From what I can remember it was quite informative. (Based around the use of TyrePliers products) Not the good old days of a bead chisel and 4lb hammer.
The best way to inflate a split rim safely is attach the hose, face the split ring to the ground. Stand well back, turn air or compressor on.
I've changed more than I'd care to remember in my time and have done all of them this way.
Never had one seperate, but never took the risk either.

Just looked at their website, it was a "Gold Label Edition" magazine.

Geoff.
Geoff,
Landcruiser HDJ78,
Grey hair is hereditary, you get it from children. Baldness is caused by watching the Wallabies.

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AnswerID: 91655

Follow Up By: Domster - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:45

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:45
Good call - thanks Geoff. I'll have a hunt for that one at lunch time. Cheers, Dom.
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Reply By: Bitsumishin - Mike (WA) - Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 22:39

Thursday, Jan 06, 2005 at 22:39
I've used tyrepliers & they break the bead quite easily but getting the tyre off the rim was a lot harder work (Mind you I wasn't using the 24 foot tyre levers that you have. Thats one hell of a fulcrum you've got to work with). I've heard R&R Beadbreakers do a better job of removing the tyre but this was on standard rims, not splits. (I know, you only meant 2 foot levers but I couldn't resist).
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Follow Up By: Domster - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:20

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:20
LOL ~:P ... he-he - good pick up Bits ! Yer right, that's some long irons I got there! (..I really must shake some of the crap out from this keyboard and unstick that 'shift' key). Dom :)
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 00:00

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 00:00
No offence, but by some of the points brought up here that you dont know, you really should find someone to show you.

Split rims can be deadly. Stories around truck drivin when I was doing it, of them going through cabs of trucks...

Do you have all your communication stuff done? Radios? Permits for where your going? Maps? Backup devices? EPIRB maybe?

Where are you at with your planning..?
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Follow Up By: Willem - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 10:04

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 10:04
Oh god...Mr Misery....can't you ever see anything positive? Life can be deadly....don't get out of bed!

Split rims can be deadly if not seated properly and if inflated with a high speed air pump. But with the ordinary run of the mill 4x4 tyre pump I doubt it. Over many years of running splits and repairing goodness know how many punctures out in the bush I have never had an issue. Take precautions by all means. Once a rim bead is seated it is very hard for it to come off. As for coming off on the road whilst driving....must be freakish accidents and definitely not your everyday occurence.

As with most things use common sense. We all have it in us...even you, Trucky
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Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:40

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:40
Oh god...Mr Misery....can't you ever see anything positive? Life can be deadly....don't get out of bed

Sorry for trying to help the bloke. If he gets killed I will take great pleasure in presenting you his head and brains. You can tell his kids what happened to dad.
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Follow Up By: Willem - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:58

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 16:58
You are definitely in the wrong line of work

Methinks being an Undertaker will suit you fine......hahahaha

Now look here son, your daddy was an idiot and...............
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Reply By: Domster - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:43

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 09:43
No offence taken m8. That's why I posted to this forum. I've picked up a lot of great tips from this community ... 'thanks' go out to everyone who took their time to share some of their wisdom. If anyone's up @ Uluru for full-moon over Australia Day, it'll be my pleasure to shout a cold one. - dom :)
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Reply By: GordonB - Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 17:39

Friday, Jan 07, 2005 at 17:39
Domster
Like many others I love "skinny splits" because they're so easy to change in the bush and go just about anywhere - better in mud than "fats" and not quite as good in soft sand.

As for safety, I always put my rolled up swag over the rim while inflating and sit on it. A tent, tarp or heavy blanket would do the same trick.

A man was killed when he removed the tyre of his wheelbarrow and inflated it at his local garage. It blew apart due to overpressure. The small size of the tyre and rapid inflation rate were contributing factors but all he needed to do was put his lie it down and stand on it while he was inflating. Instead it hit him in the chest.
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Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Monday, Jan 10, 2005 at 19:58

Monday, Jan 10, 2005 at 19:58
Mate - there is one pearl of wisdom I havnt shared with you yet that is take your time fixing the flat rough the area up well, spend heaps of time kneading the patch on and thouroughly check the tyre for the offending stake. also thoroughly check to see if it is the only one. there is one thing worse than fixing a flat and that is fixing it twice. Also prevent flats by inspecting tyres for stakes that may work their way in. remove them with a small screwdriver - enjoy
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Follow Up By: Domster - Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005 at 09:42

Tuesday, Jan 11, 2005 at 09:42
Nice one Davoe - a good point. That's happened to me onthe pushie b4 - grrrrrr! Cheers, Dom :)
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