changing tyres

Submitted: Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:19
ThreadID: 19327 Views:2489 Replies:4 FollowUps:5
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(Would these be better than the tyrepliers ) http://www.tyrepliers.com.au/Products/Manual%20Changer.htm


Tyre Changers(made by tyrepliers)

The Manual Tyre Changer works in two ways. Firstly it removes the tyre from the rim after the bead has been broken and, secondly it re-fits the tyre to the rim after any repairs have been carried out.

The Tyrepliers Manual Tyre Changers have all been designed to be totally transportable system for easy removal and refit of tyres in the workshop or field

. The Unit has a minimum number of working parts to ensure reliability under extreme environmental conditions.

All Three Model's Produced comprises of the following parts:

A removable work head,
A unique handle for removing and refitting of tyres (Tool pictured fitting a tyre below and right) ,
and a work stand and or bull bar mounting bracket (Depending on the model) .
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Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:34

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:34
Looks good to me, but doesnt look hard to make.

Looking for how small it packs away to...

Remember the tire he is using in the demo would have been off the car a few dozen times, so would make it look REAL easy ;)
AnswerID: 92813

Follow Up By: glenno(bris) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:39

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:39
I dont like doing much so i look for the easiest way to do something . I remember taking a tyre off a rim once about 25 years ago with a pair of tyre levers and i was completely stuffed and back then i was young .
Did you see where you can mount it on the bullbar .
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FollowupID: 351697

Follow Up By: Truckster (Vic) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 15:04

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 15:04
Nothing wrong with the easy way!!! Specially in the bush, or out in the open in 30+ degree heat..
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FollowupID: 351709

Reply By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:42

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:42
looks simular to what they use in tyre shops except without the hydraulic bead breaker. How much more? and if youre troopy has splitties you dont need it anly the tyre plier. Also as Truckster says how much space
AnswerID: 92816

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:44

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:44
oh clicked on your rig pic you dont have splitties
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FollowupID: 351699

Follow Up By: glenno(bris) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:48

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 14:48
NO i dont have splitties , only these alloy wheels that came with the car when i bought it . They wont be staying either . They will be replaced by steel rims eventually .
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FollowupID: 351701

Reply By: Member - Sparkie (QLD) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 18:25

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 18:25
glenno(bris)
Looks like a winner to me.

Nothing worse than busting your hump working in a position not meant for the human body( no khama sutra jokes please);-)

I definately like the Idea of the bullbar mount.

Sparkie(IE not Y) ;-)
AnswerID: 92856

Follow Up By: glenno(bris) - Friday, Jan 14, 2005 at 00:26

Friday, Jan 14, 2005 at 00:26
I reckon myself its S#!^ hot .
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FollowupID: 351872

Reply By: Member - Phil G (SA) - Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 22:34

Thursday, Jan 13, 2005 at 22:34
Glenno,

I do a lot of outback travel, have gone to tubeless over the past 10 years, and haven't considered needing a tyre changer.

We plug the majority of tubeless punctures - takes 5 minutes and you don't have to remove the wheel. Can get a permanent repair when you're back in town. Also, if you treat your tyres right, you'll rarely get punctures.

On the rare occasions I need to remove a tyre to patch it from the inside, I use the high lift as the beadbreaker (kinder to the alloys too). I then coat the tyre beads with detergent BEFORE I lever the tyre off - makes it slide off stacks easier. Levering off is easy - just got to make sure the opposite side of the bead is in the wheel well. Also make sure that you lever it over the front face of the rim. Bit of practice at home makes perfect.

I also think that tubeless are much easier than split rims which often rust up and can be a bugger to break the bead, and lever up the split. Reassembly of the split is easy though.

Cheers
Phil
AnswerID: 92885

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