Spare Removal

Submitted: Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:22
ThreadID: 19394 Views:1962 Replies:10 FollowUps:15
This Thread has been Archived
I have read with interest various tips on tyre changing and find them very informative. However, for most 4Wdrivers, before changing a tyre one has to remove the spare from the rear wheel carrier. As this is usually a metre or so above ground level, I ask how, without straining ones back, do you lower the spare to the ground? When I've needed to carry out this exercise help has been around. If one is on their own this could pose a back breaking problem as 4Wd. wheels are not light. Tips appreciated.
Ron.
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Willem - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:43

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:43
I am tall so I don't have a particular problem. I normally position a leg on the rear step, slide the wheel towards me taking the weight of the wheel on my upper leg and then drop the wheel on the ground, restraining the bounce with my hand. I lift the wheel up the same way. Always remember to bend your knees when lifting or lowering heavy objects and keep your back straight. This way you minimise the chance of a back strain injury.

To lighten the load you could put less air in the tyre and pump it up when it is on the ground, to the desired pressure.
AnswerID: 93229

Follow Up By: Member - Pesty (SA) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:59

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:59
Hahahahahahaahahahahahaah, I think you have been out there on your own toooooo long willie.

Pesty smiling!
0
FollowupID: 352217

Follow Up By: Willem - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:52

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:52
Another thought is to make up a small swing away hoist and bolt it to your rear bumper or towbar. You could even carry it loose and bolt it to the towbar when needed.

Pesty..........What are you on about???
0
FollowupID: 352229

Follow Up By: Top Cat - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 14:54

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 14:54
Willem posted::: To lighten the load you could put less air in the tyre and pump it up when it is on the ground, to the desired pressure.

I think this is what he is laughing at mate.........lol.

Im guessing you meant it would stop the tyre from bouncing all over the place when u just drop it down???
0
FollowupID: 352235

Reply By: Top Cat - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:47

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 12:47
Maybe the use of a hook or bit of rope or wire with a high lift jack??

AnswerID: 93232

Reply By: Lone Wolf - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:09

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:09
In america, they are trialing a new product which takes the place of air and or nitrogen.

It's a heli-nitro mix, which gives superior cooling capabilities, as well as making the tyre extremely light to pick up.

More info can be found www.ineedtogetfit.coz.im/apuny/person

Just kidding!!!

olfie
AnswerID: 93235

Follow Up By: Ron - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:25

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:25
I actually do have a bad back due to a car accident. Which is why I raise this question as I'm sure I'm not alone. I have been toying with the idea of using a highlift jack, but as yet haven't come to any conclusions.
0
FollowupID: 352223

Follow Up By: Member - Peter (on the move) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:38

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:38
Hi Guys

I have a hell of a lot of experience with earthmover tyres fitted up to 360 tonne truck capacity (63 inch) and can guarantee you that all the bull you hear about nitrogen / helium is all Bull$^&%.

The tyres will not run noticeably cooler, you will not avoid a tyre fire (nitrogen merley needs a 5% air dilution, not 5% oxygen, and it will support flame) and weight will not be noticeably decreased.

Sorry to rain on the parade but this is a real sore point with me as people who sell nitrogen are doing a good marketing job, thats all. The merits of course are less rim corrosion and possibly a little better air retention as nitrogen seals the rubber. This is negated of course every time you do a pressure check or in the case of sand driving reducing tyre pressures and re inflating with your compressor.

Plan on jury rigging something up to help get the spare off the wheel carrier, recovery strap / snatchblock all the things you probably have with you in any case.

Cheers Pete
0
FollowupID: 352226

Follow Up By: Bonz (Vic) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:52

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:52
olfie (sic),

Rubber molecules are not specifically constructed to hold nitrogen or any other non-eclectic gas. I wouldnt think you're idea would hold air!
.
Time is an illusion produced by the passage of history
.

Lifetime Member
My Profile  My Blog  My Position  Send Message
Moderator

0
FollowupID: 352228

Follow Up By: Member - Peter (on the move) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 14:35

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 14:35
I understand that you are taking the pi#@ but nitrogen does offer better sealing properties to the rubber liner rather than air straight from a compressor.

Like I said, there is bugger all benefit to using Nitrogen rather other than rim corrosion being reduced. A better option for improved air retention and rim corrosion is to use a designed sealant / corrosion inhibitor such as Rimexcel available from Rimex, or similar.

Cheers Pete
0
FollowupID: 352231

Follow Up By: SteveL - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 21:51

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 21:51
I once read an article about rim corrosion,and it is basically caused by static discharging into the rim eroding the surface and then rusting due to moisture in the air inside the tyre.I often find very fine powered
metal inside my truck tyres which appears to be caused by this.
0
FollowupID: 352298

Follow Up By: Member - Peter (on the move) - Sunday, Jan 16, 2005 at 00:36

Sunday, Jan 16, 2005 at 00:36
Steve

It is also as basic as water in the compressor lines being injected into the air chamber.

Cheers Pete
0
FollowupID: 352315

Reply By: theshadows - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:35

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 13:35
Do what I do dont replace the tyre. I just fix it on the car as it sits.
In the last 5 years around the city I have not carried a spare.. The only time I pop a spare on the back is when I go away.

shadow
AnswerID: 93236

Reply By: ianmc - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:07

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:07
My expertise shall cost U dollars but here goesLOL!
What about a set of 2ndhand alloys. The difference in weight is amazing!
Also better ride & maybe handling due to lower unsprung weight.
AnswerID: 93244

Follow Up By: ianmc - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:10

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:10
But wait theres more!
What about a small block & tackle as found in auto stores, clip over roof gutter or roof bar/rack or screw in a special shackle to hold it.
Might need a sheet over the paint job to protect it whilst winching.
0
FollowupID: 352236

Reply By: Member - muzzgit - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:13

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:13
Hi Ron, there are some options available to you. One would be to see if you could use a narrower tyre on a different than standard rim, kind of like a "space saver" tyre that some jap cars come out with now. As long as you get the same rolling radius as the 4 tyres in the car, the width doesn't really matter. Of course this means that it may be prudent to get the buggered tyre fixed or replaced as soon as possible, But at least you have a spare tyre. The other down side is that in some cases, it would be a good idea to only run this spare on the rear axle, as it may affect stearing at any reasonable speed, particularly with a load on.

You could also try a fabrication workshop, possibly one that makes swing away wheel carriers, and I'm sure thay could rig up something to make lifting the tyre much easier. I dare say the end result may not be very pretty, but if it saves your back, who cares. You've only got one back, and sometimes you don't appreciate this untill it's buggered, as you know!

If you run tubeless tyres, I would recommend you get a GOOD tubeless repair kit. These can be used with the tyre still on the car, depending on the type, size and position of the puncture, AND a bottle of ZZZZISH. We used to have this as teenagers to fix punctures on our motor bikes. It's simply a bottle of sticky goo stuff that screws onto the tyre valve and it will TEMPORARILY fix SMALL puctures.

Cheers,

Muzz
AnswerID: 93245

Follow Up By: Ron - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:48

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 15:48
Some good suggestions have been made along the same thoughts I've had ie. highlift jack, swing away pulley system. The tubeless repair kit is definitely the go without removing the spare. But, I rotate all tyres regularly including the spare and this is definitely where a back saving idea is needed. Keep the suggestions going everyone as I'm sure there's a solution. Thanks to all.
0
FollowupID: 352240

Reply By: GO_OFFROAD - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 16:17

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 16:17
Or you could buy one of my tyre racks, which goes onto the vehicle, behind the 4 bolts which hold the carrier to the door, spacing it out 20mm, and it makes a 600mm x 250mm shelf over the spare on the door which has a eye which can have a ratchet rope fitted to it, to hoist the wheel up, or down, as well as you are able to use it the rest of the time to carry the rubbish bag, the chainsaw, an arm full of wood, or to stand on, when combined with our ladder which goes on the spare tyre wheel nuts, to access the roof rack with a wide grab point [600mm] and able to put both feet on it, to climb up onto the roof rack, or down.
AnswerID: 93252

Follow Up By: Jezza - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 16:47

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 16:47
Hi Go_Offroad,

I am interested to see what your tyre rack looks like - sound like a handy gadget. Got any pic's or a web site?

Cheers,
Jezza
0
FollowupID: 352246

Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:02

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:02
will post some pics, and more details this week, when Im back in the office.
0
FollowupID: 352247

Follow Up By: Lone Wolf - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:21

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:21
From what you have explained, sounds like a mighty fine idea.

I wish you the best of luck with it. Well done.

Wolfie
0
FollowupID: 352252

Reply By: GO_OFFROAD - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:27

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 17:27
Thanks Wolfie,
there is some of our other products crammed onto this page, while we finish setting up the shop, and online section, as well as our new rear storage system, camp oven, fire cooking utensils, which i dont think we have pics of yet.

but its all go at the moment.

slidersteps.
AnswerID: 93262

Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 19:58

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 19:58
Do it under a tree branch (or a swing arm mounted on the roof rack) with a rope and pulley set up as a block and tackle.

Dig a hole and back the car in, so that the spare tyre is level with the ground.

Get your passenger to get down on all fours and roll the tyre off the carrier onto their back (better still, sit in the car while the passenger replaces the flat tyre)

Seriously though, I think the swing arm idea would actually work. Attachment point (pivoting) at rear corner of roof rack, two pieces of rectangular section tube steel 20 cm long with elbow join, pulley on outer end, will fold against back end of roof rack when not in use)
AnswerID: 93281

Follow Up By: GO_OFFROAD - Sunday, Jan 16, 2005 at 13:13

Sunday, Jan 16, 2005 at 13:13
We are currently designing a roof rack with swing arms, for the canopy to be fitted to, to save pegs, ropes, and poles, this would also be able to be used for the same purpose.
0
FollowupID: 352376

Reply By: Outnabout David (SA) - Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 21:34

Saturday, Jan 15, 2005 at 21:34
Go_Offroad has the right idea and it is very versatile but in the meantime what I do is get the long handle shovel out and sit the spade end on the rear bar. Undoo the spare and slide it down the handle. To put it back toll the wheel up turn around and then just lift it a few inches and presto.
AnswerID: 93297

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)