Why jacking ponts on bars are a poor substitute

Submitted: Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:10
ThreadID: 19789 Views:1721 Replies:3 FollowUps:4
This Thread has been Archived
Must have been bored but I got my hi lift out to test how high you have to jack a 75 series ute compared to an 80 series. The results were the 80 being the clear winner with 30cm and 17 for the ute just to lift the wheel. Both vehicles had the hi lift well and truly working in their top 1/3 just to lift a wheel barely off the ground. Having used hi lifts on a few occasions combined with hub lifters I realized that those recoverys would have been much more difficult/ immposible using jacking points not to mention the extra instability as a hub lifter will be working at about 60cm lower than a jacking point for the same amount of wheel lift
Back Expand Un-Read 0 Moderator

Reply By: Member - Roachie (SA) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:22

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:22
Davoe,
The HLJ (high lift jack) has many uses. The 2 set-ups you have described would not normally be used to achieve the same result, nor would they be used in the same circumstances.
Attaching the hlj to the hub is the "right" thing to do when you need to lift that wheel to pack stuff under it (say in the case of when you're stuck in deep wheel ruts and have bellied out).
Using the hlj under say the middle of the bullbar or rear bar is not as desirable but can be used (under strict supervision and in the knowledge that damage to the vehicle may occur) to raise a vehicle clear of an obstruction and then pushing it to one side; off the jack. Doing this can move that end of the vehicle up to 1 or 2 feet across at a time. Whilst I haven't seen it done, there are stories about blokes turning a vehicle a full 180 degrees in it's own body length when there has been no alternative.
As for the 30cm v 17cm between the 80 and 75 series, that is to be expected due to the relative lack of articulation offered by leaf sprung vehicles when compared to coil sprung units.
Cya mate
AnswerID: 94984

Follow Up By: Member - Davoe (WA) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:30

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 14:30
I have used a highlift/hublifter to push a vehicle off the jack as you described in a particlary nasty multi pronged hangup. With the hublifter we still needed full hight from the jack. The recovery would not have been possible using the method you describe as not enough hight could have been gained. You can still push a vehicle around with only one wheel lifted
0
FollowupID: 353835

Reply By: glenno(bris) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 16:44

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 16:44
Thats why i carry a hydraulic bottle jack , steel base plate . I do have a hilift jack in the back for emergency purposes (swapping for cartons of beer if i run out in the sticks) .
AnswerID: 95000

Follow Up By: Mike Harding - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 19:59

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 19:59
>Thats why i carry a hydraulic bottle jack , steel base plate

Yep, me too. A lot to be said for a small bottle jack. Mind you it doesn't look as "Manly!" as a high lift bolted to the spare wheel :(

Mike Harding
0
FollowupID: 353855

Follow Up By: glenno(bris) - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 20:30

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 20:30
All jokes aside . Ya carnt carry too much recovery/emergency equipment.
0
FollowupID: 353857

Follow Up By: Rosco - Bris. - Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 20:42

Wednesday, Jan 26, 2005 at 20:42
Yep

But definitely no fun scratching around in the mud or sand to get the little sucker in place. Give me a high lift anytime.
0
FollowupID: 353858

Reply By: lazylcd - Friday, Jan 28, 2005 at 01:59

Friday, Jan 28, 2005 at 01:59
both have their uses, i carry both types everywhere, ive even heard of a high lift being used as a bead breaker,

and a bottle jack is an amazing invention too :o)

Lazy
AnswerID: 95300

Sponsored Links

Popular Products (14)