Which Way??

Submitted: Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
ThreadID: 2046 Views:1706 Replies:15 FollowUps:8
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My wife and I will heading off for the big trip round and thru Aussie. We will be leaving Adelaide at the end of October.
I was planning on going west to Perth, then work my way up north east and round to Darwin etc lr=eaving the centre and Cape York till last.
Trouble is, if I leave that late in the year, I'll hit the wet season up north west. I could go anti clockwise, but NSW and Vic dont hold a lot of interest for me att he moment.
Can anyone contribute ideas as to alternative options, obviiously getting to the top at the end of the wet.
Any helpful suggestions appreciated.

Andrew
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Reply By: Graham - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Have a look at story, Big Trip the essential guide, Getting Ready for your big Trip by Sue Neales, in the archives section at http://www.ontheroad.net.au/
also some useful info here
http://members.ozemail.com.au/~adryan/caravan/home.htm

Graham
1999 Pathfinder Ti
2002 17ft Evernew 'All Roads' Van.
AnswerID: 6905

Reply By: Member - Willem- Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew, How much time do you inytend to take on your trip 'round the block? I would tend to go anti-clockwise around Oz. Australia is buffeted by westerly and south easterly winds. If you travel clockwise you are always into the wind. My last business, which involved a lot of travelling, towing a 27ft caravan, always seemed to steer me in a clockwise direction and it was heavy going. Please do not discount any of the States or places as there is so much to see in this land of ours. Happy travelling. Willie
AnswerID: 6920

Reply By: Kate - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
You didn,t say how long you hope to be away - which is probably the most important thing as to which way to go. As far as I know the north Aust wet can start mid November tru till April (will depend if a wet or dry wet - confusing yes). I have known people who have done the north in the wet, but have been experienced 4WDers and been prepared to stay put if roads get closed, but I don't think I would be doing it, also there is the heat and humidity to deal with. We have done several trips to north Aust, eg Kimberleys, Darwin, Cape York and they have always been done in our winter months so it is more comfortable travelling.
AnswerID: 6921

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Thanks for the responses....Intend to be away for 18 months - 2 years..depending n how long my beloved tolerates my snoring :) So can stay put for a time at various places. Intend to leave cape york till last as I will feel I have enuff 4x4 experience by then. Anti-clockwise has been my feeling. FYI...I would like to stay through a wet season in Darwin to experience it. i know a lot of the negatives but I still would like to experience it for myself. Wouldnt intend travelling off the bitumen during the wet though.
Has any one done the flinders or the Gammons in Summer? How hot does it get in those areas????

Thanks again
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FollowupID: 3119

Reply By: Member - Willem- Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew, I lived in and around Darwin for about 20 years. The wet seasons are pretty exciting at first. When you are a youngster everything is an adventure. Going bush in the WET was fun. 12ft grass to drive through and plenty of mud not to mention mozzies and crocs. After the age of 50 the extreme humidity and damp conditions get to you and I decamped south to become a Mexican:-). Go and experience a WET and see what real rain is like without the cold.
The Flinders and Gammon Ranges may get temperatures beyond 40C during December, January and February. The mercury hit 48.5 C in Januaryt 2001 on my back verandah here at Peterborough in the Southern Flinders Ranges. Something to reflect upon. Tasmania in summer will be cooler!! Cheers, Willie
AnswerID: 6934

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew - Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00
Hi
Willie,
Lived in NZ for the last 20yrs..had enuff of cooler:) When I've had enuff of hot, I'll do tassie.

Andrew
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FollowupID: 3152

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6940

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew - Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00
If I go anti clockwise the whole way Bill, I'll wear out my driver side tyres first as they will have travelled further !!! :)Would have to swap them half way round or drive backwards maybe..:)
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FollowupID: 3154

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6941

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6942

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6943

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6944

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6945

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6946

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6947

Reply By: Bill - Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00

Wednesday, Sep 25, 2002 at 00:00
Andrew it is considerably shorter to travel anticlockwise as travelling on the left side of the road makes the trip on average several metres closer to the centre. Therefore an anticlockwise circle is many kilometres shorter than a clockwise. A previous mention of wind is also a reason for choosing anticlockwise.
AnswerID: 6948

Follow Up By: Member - Andrew - Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00
Sorry Bill, could you repeat that...I missed it :)
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FollowupID: 3153

Reply By: Member - Mal - Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00

Thursday, Sep 26, 2002 at 00:00
Bill, I think you made your point. Mal.
AnswerID: 6952

Reply By: Blackie - Friday, Sep 27, 2002 at 00:00

Friday, Sep 27, 2002 at 00:00
My maths makes the difference on a 20 000km trip about 29 metres. and that was putting a 10 metre difference between clockwise and anticlocwise.
AnswerID: 6996

Follow Up By: Blackie - Saturday, Sep 28, 2002 at 00:00

Saturday, Sep 28, 2002 at 00:00
Or was that 290 metres..........either way hardly worth worrying about.
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FollowupID: 3177

Follow Up By: Stephenf - Monday, Sep 30, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Sep 30, 2002 at 00:00
Thirty metres is about right. The difference is based on the difference in radius, not the distance travelled, and is the same whether you drive around Australia or around the local footy ground.
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FollowupID: 3186

Follow Up By: Member - Willem- Monday, Sep 30, 2002 at 00:00

Monday, Sep 30, 2002 at 00:00
Heard on an ABC Radio quiz last week that the difference in distance going anti-clockwise is 900 metres. Cheers, Willie
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FollowupID: 3194

Follow Up By: Stephenf - Tuesday, Oct 01, 2002 at 00:00

Tuesday, Oct 01, 2002 at 00:00
Ok, let's do the maths. For simplicity, assume that Australia is circular. Call the circumference and radius of the outside and inside lanes C,R and c,r respectively. We therefore have C= 2*pi*R and c=2*pi*r. Therefore the difference in circumferences C-c=2*pi*(R-r). If we are generous and assume the difference in radius R-r is 10 metres, the equation becomes C-c=2*pi*10 which is about 63 metres.
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FollowupID: 3203

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