Tent and/or Camper Trailer heaters.

Submitted: Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:21
ThreadID: 21036 Views:15212 Replies:15 FollowUps:7
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Heading into the cold in July and was wondering what all are currently using to warm up the Camper Trailer for the kids (and adults) before bedtime??
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Reply By: Muddy 'doe (SA) - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:23

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:23
if money no object the check out Webasto diesel furnaces

Cheers
Muddy
AnswerID: 101499

Follow Up By: Muddy 'doe (SA) - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:29

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:29
http://www.webasto.com.au/am/en/am_rv_heaters_960.html
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FollowupID: 359417

Reply By: Member - Anni M (SA) - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:46

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 21:46
Hi Bear,

This all depends where you are! If you are staying in caravan parks or somewhere with access to 240volts, then use a little fan heater - heats up the camper trailer a treat. If you are in the bush then light a campfire for cooking but also to keep you warm. If you get cold before bedtime, then you will find it very hard to get warm in bed. We have a Coleman gas heater which is fantastic, but very risky in the tent, especially with kids. Lots of layers of warm clothing (thermal undies are good) and a good old fashioned standby ... a hot water bottle (recycle the water each night and you won't waste any). In really cold weather I go to bed in thermal undies, socks, a track suit and a woolley hat - its not a fashion statement, but it works. Good quality sleeping bags or doonas are important too. Last trip our coldest night was minus 6 degrees, so I think I'm reasonably qualified!!!!
Have a great time! Remember to keep the billy full, so that even if it freezes overnight, you can still put it on the heat and have a hot cup of tea in the morning!
Happy travels
Anni
AnswerID: 101504

Reply By: Bob of KAOS - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 22:47

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 22:47
Bear,
They might be warm before bedtime (around the fire) but they will freeze in bed. Sadly, a down sleeping bag can cost around $500.
AnswerID: 101515

Follow Up By: Member - Brian (WA) - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:05

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:05
bear. never tryed this but been told to put the coals from a campfire in a camp over, stand it on some bricks though. we have been
out and a cup of water has frozen overnight in the camper.we take the duner off our bed at home with us.
brian
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FollowupID: 359425

Reply By: MarkC - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:02

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:02
G'Day Bear,

Coleman have 2 heaters which are safe to use in a tent/camper. They are called "Catalytic Heaters" and K-Mart have one for around $90, Kangaroo Tent City in NSW have a fan assisted model which was more expensive, can't remember the price.

Cheers,
Mark
AnswerID: 101518

Follow Up By: Member - Bear - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:48

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:48
Thanks everyone for all your ideas.
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FollowupID: 359431

Follow Up By: Member - Chrispy (NSW) - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 12:16

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 12:16
Even though catalytic heaters are flameless, they still put out a decent amount of carbon monoxide and are to be used in VENTILATED tents or campers only. Don't go shutting the doors and windows overnight....or you may never get up in the morning.
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FollowupID: 359458

Reply By: Muddy 'doe (SA) - Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:19

Monday, Mar 07, 2005 at 23:19
This may sound a bit soft but there was discussion on here a while ago about keeping warm while sleeping and someone mentioned 240v electric blankets. Turns out they only draw about 60 or 70 watts.

So if you have a decent capacity battery system and a 150w inverter then you could use an electric blanket in the camper trailer, at least even for 30 or 40 minutes to warm the bed up before you get in.

Just a thought. Might whack one in my swag!

Cheers
Muddy
AnswerID: 101520

Follow Up By: Member - Jimbo (VIC) - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 07:54

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 07:54
Muddy,

You can get a 12 volt one for about $40 these days too.

That's technolgy.

Cheers,

Jim.
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FollowupID: 359440

Reply By: Member - Hugh (WA) - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 01:02

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 01:02
Hi Bear,

When we have access to power, the electric fan heater works a treat.

Our children also like water bottles, particularly as my wife made some nice animal type fluffy covers to put over them. This works well for bush camping. You might not be into the fluffy covers, but I was surprised by how well the old fashioned water bottle warmed up the sleeping bags. Pop 'em in 1/2 hr before sleeping and you'll go to bed comfy warm.

Hugh
AnswerID: 101531

Reply By: whitehorse - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 01:27

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 01:27
hi bear, electric blankets are the go ,i have an 800 watt inverter in our van which runs straight of the vehicle battery and runs a double electric blanket allnight without any problems , no starting problems in the morning ,either cheers
AnswerID: 101534

Reply By: dublediff - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 11:44

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 11:44
The most basic remedy is to ensure that you have insulation from the ground. Put one of those silver survival mats underneath and wear a beanie (remember the old saying "if your toes are cold put a hat on" is very true. Cheers.
AnswerID: 101558

Reply By: Pyalong - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 13:09

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 13:09
Used one of those coleman lpg gas heaters for 2 months last year....worked an absolute treat!!.

Cheers,
Mick.
AnswerID: 101567

Reply By: Truckster (Vic) - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 13:18

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 13:18
12 V Electric blanket!!!
AnswerID: 101569

Reply By: Moose - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 14:31

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 14:31
Hey there Bear - what sort of wimpy talk is this about warming the camper! We've been camping in the cold heaps of times, in a tent so much closer to the ground than you will be, and have never contemplated heating it. All you have to do is ensure you have the right gear and you don't have to worry about pre-warming the camper (or the bed). We use flannelette (spelling?) sheets and they are so much warmer to get into than normal cotton sheets - must be those little furry bits that limit how much cold material actually touches you. And then we have a thick doona over the top. And I wear a nice warm beanie (home made from fleecy material that isn't itchy like many of the bought ones) because I have less hair than I used too. Have slept in negative temperatures with that setup without any problems at all. No need to spend hundreds of dollars on down sleeping bags or have electric blankets that'll flatten the battery or have heaters that may just kill you (after all you're not likely to have the windows open for ventilation if it's bloody cold are you).
AnswerID: 101575

Follow Up By: Member - Bear - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 14:36

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 14:36
Thanks for all the ideas.
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FollowupID: 359467

Reply By: GOB & denny vic member - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 17:28

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 17:28
mate
for the adults a bottle of port or ginger wine if you are really desparate give the kids a nip also beaut for the big kids i dont notice the cold till early mornig then get up and stir the fire

lololol
steve
AnswerID: 101596

Reply By: TheUndertaker - Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 21:26

Tuesday, Mar 08, 2005 at 21:26
Three stages to keep warm [adults].
1. mulled wine.
2. good woman.
3. combine 1+2
Three stages to keep warm [kids]
1. down sleeping bag
2. baked beans
3. combine 1+2
AnswerID: 101620

Reply By: Member - Melissa - Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 00:54

Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 00:54
Hi Bear,

Camping World were advertising some fleecy camp blankets recently. They were zippered on 3 sides so could be zipped up and used as a sleeping bag liner for extra warmth on those cold nights or just used open as a blanket. Unfortunately they only come in single size but I'm planning on getting the kids one each. Thing with camping in WA is you can encounter several nights around zero degrees as you head north towards 20 degree nights. A few cold nights here and there doesn't warrant investing in a down sleeping bag. Also on warmer nights the kids can lie on top of their sleeping bags and just use the blankets as a lightweight cover. Anyway, these blankets might be worth looking at.

:o) Melissa
AnswerID: 101666

Reply By: Markymark - Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 22:48

Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 22:48
Done a bit of backpacking, including cross-country skiing. If you're sleeping on the ground make sure you have insulation under you. In the snow I've found 2 of the those cheap foam camp mattresses ($5 each) to be enough. Invest in good quality sleeping bags. Ones with hoods are best so you can tighten them up and not let any of your warmth escape. You don't need down filled unless you're restricted for space; you can get some great synthetic bags for reasonable money, or if you already have a bag that's so-so, buy a fleece sleeping bag ($20-30) and put it inside, will improve out of sight. Thermals, socks and beanie are the go.

A trick we done in the snow was go for a quick run/jog (minute or so) before jumping into bed, then you're toasty warm when you jump in. If you then have good insulation from sleeping bag/mattress, you'll be fine for the night.

Once you have these sorted out, do the heater thing. In our Jayco camper we take a little electric when staying in parks, only takes a couple of minutes to warm camper up. When out bush I get up first in the morning and light the stove burners, this warms up camper enough for kids to get dressed and then they're off, open camper to air out. Don't do this going to bed for fear of fumes and not waking up!

Cheers,

Mark.
AnswerID: 101856

Follow Up By: Markymark - Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 23:10

Wednesday, Mar 09, 2005 at 23:10
Also worth looking at your clothing. Being July you'll no doubt strike rain somewhere. Cotton is shocking, when it's wet it stays wet and has minimal thermal qualities. Start investing (if you haven't already) in woolen/poly type garments. Both will stay warm when wet and dry out well. Poly dries quicker but wool safer around fire (especially kids).

Amazes me seeing parents dress kids in denim jeans at the snow, the poor kids freeze once they're wet and the wind gets up.

Cheers,

Mark.
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FollowupID: 359704

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