Radio SPEAK

Submitted: Thursday, May 03, 2001 at 00:00
ThreadID: 211 Views:1622 Replies:6 FollowUps:1
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I have just purchased and installed a UHF TX3400 radio into my GU Patrol for our planned trip to the centre of AUS during Sept - Oct.

My question is that as I am new to mobile radio, what do I say to call another user or how do you communicate correctly.

My question may sound stupid but communication language is not an area that is supplied within the USER Manual.
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Reply By: Shane - Thursday, May 03, 2001 at 00:00

Thursday, May 03, 2001 at 00:00
Hi Tim,

I think the best answer is to "lurk". Just listen to common channels and listen to how people talk. These days we still use "Roger" ( I agree or I will do what you suggested)and "Breaker" (I would like to interrupt your conversation to ask a question). "10-4 Good Buddy has (thankfully) disappeared. Be natural and be polite is the best advice.

Hope that helps a little.

Cheers
AnswerID: 415

Reply By: Nigel Gorry - Thursday, May 03, 2001 at 00:00

Thursday, May 03, 2001 at 00:00
Excellent Choice of Radio...

Another thing that probably isnt in the users manual is the details of specific uses of channels.

It is illegal to use channels 5 (and 35) for any thing other than an emergency. Of course in a outback emergency you would be better off scanning all channels to find one in use and then ask for help rather than just staying on channel 5.

Channels 31 to 38 are repeater input channels and you should take care not to use these channels within the range of a repeater if you want to stay on the right side of the law and not annoy everyone who uses the repeater. It is also not permitted to use a repeater output channel (1-8)in simplex mode when in range of a repeater.

Channel 40 is the road channel and used by trucks for passing communication. It often has bad language so if your easily offended or have children then avoid this channel, although lurking can give you advance warning of problems such as road works, accidents or radar traps.

Channel 18 is used by the caravanning folks although in the bush many travellers lurk on 40.

If you are travelling in convoy then choose an channel between 9-17 or 19-30 for chatting.

Using channel 40 or a repeater channel for convoy chatting is very inconsiderate and often results in verbal abuse from someone with little tact.

If you wish to contact a passing traveller or truck then on channel 40 try saying something like "have you got a copy north/south bound" followed by some identifying description of the passing vehicle/truck...

eg white patrol/cruiser
name of freight company eg "ipec semi"

Cheers and Happy Travels

Nigel Gorry
Cairns Base Operator
VKS737
AnswerID: 417

Reply By: John - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 00:00

Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 00:00
Tim,
Good advice in the replies so far. Just a suggestion, it is best not to call a truckdriver by identifying his vehicle by Company name (Ipec or Parsons, or Smiths, etc) or make of truck (Mack, Volvo,etc) or, indeed, any means of his being identified because he may well not wish to be identified. It is best to call "Copy Northbound/Southbound?" Dont forget that these people are working to make a living, forced to work long hours and are often frustrated and weary. Also,it is a fact that a number of Police vehicles, particularly Highway Patrol in N.S.W. who have a very low level of tolerance, also listen into UHF by scanning all channels and, if able to identify the vehicle warning of their position, will almost certainly intercept that vehicle and issue an infringement notice for some reason. This practice is extremely common in N.S.W., less so in South Australia and opccasionally occurs in other States. Most Police are tolerant but dont forget, the primary purpose of traffic Police is to POLICE THE TRAFFIC"
AnswerID: 449

Follow Up By: Nigel - Friday, May 11, 2001 at 00:00

Friday, May 11, 2001 at 00:00
I havent heard of this happening in Queensland, well not up north, but it doesnt surprise me that it happens in NSW, afterall they video every vehicle that crosses the border at Boggabilla.
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FollowupID: 109

Reply By: John - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 00:00

Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 00:00
Tim,
Good advice in the replies so far. Just a suggestion, it is best not to call a truckdriver by identifying his vehicle by Company name (Ipec or Parsons, or Smiths, etc) or make of truck (Mack, Volvo,etc) or, indeed, any means of his being identified because he may well not wish to be identified. It is best to call "Copy Northbound/Southbound?" Dont forget that these people are working to make a living, forced to work long hours and are often frustrated and weary. Also,it is a fact that a number of Police vehicles, particularly Highway Patrol in N.S.W. who have a very low level of tolerance, also listen into UHF by scanning all channels and, if able to identify the vehicle warning of their position, will almost certainly intercept that vehicle and issue an infringement notice for some reason. This practice is extremely common in N.S.W., less so in South Australia and opccasionally occurs in other States. Most Police are tolerant but dont forget, the primary purpose of traffic Police is to POLICE THE TRAFFIC"
AnswerID: 450

Reply By: ExplorOz Team - Wednesday, May 16, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, May 16, 2001 at 00:00
Tim,We know that you are asking about a slightly different issue however, in response to the number of questions that we have been receiving about the repeater bases for UHF in Australia you will now find that ExplorOz.com has a full listing of every one that is currently registered. Have a look at UHF Repeaters. Thanks must go to Nigel of the VKS 737 Cairns base for providing the input file for the list.
AnswerID: 484

Reply By: Dion - Wednesday, May 30, 2001 at 00:00

Wednesday, May 30, 2001 at 00:00
Another thing to consider recently with choice of channels refers to channels 22 and 23. These two channels (on the 477 MHz UHF) have been designated by the Communications department (their title this week) for non voice transmissions only. Although some independent advice I have heard is that you would have to be very unlucky to be caught and prosecuted. I would have thought that this type of (non voice) transmissions were for commercial radio spectrum, not Citizens Band UHF. I have no problem with the other allocated channels, 40, 5, 11 etc, but to take away two channels for what seems like a commercial application to me....?
AnswerID: 557

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